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by Col. Joseph H. Alexander USMC (Ret.)
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Asia
  • Author:
    Col. Joseph H. Alexander USMC (Ret.)
  • ISBN:
    159114003X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1591140030
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Naval Institute Press; 2nd Print edition (September 1, 2008)
  • Pages:
    328 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Asia
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1116 kb
  • ePUB format
    1205 kb
  • DJVU format
    1209 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    961
  • Formats:
    lrf txt mobi azw


Alexander wrote six books, including Utmost Savagery: The Three Days of Tarawa; The Battle History of the . Marines; and Edson's Raiders: The 1st Marine Raider Battalion in World War II. He was Naval Institute Author of the Year in 1996 and Naval History Author of the Year in 2010.

Alexander wrote six books, including Utmost Savagery: The Three Days of Tarawa; The Battle History of the . He served as scriptwriter and on-screen authority for 28 military documentaries for cable television networks.

Before the first day ended, one third of the Marines who had crossed Tarawa's deadly reef under murderous fire were .

Before the first day ended, one third of the Marines who had crossed Tarawa's deadly reef under murderous fire were killed, wounded, or missing. In three days of fighting, four Americans would win the Medal of Honor. And six-thousand combatants would die. Now, Col. Joseph Alexander, a combat Marine himself, presents the full story of Tarawa in all its horror and glory: the extreme risks, the horrific combat, and the heroic breakthroughs.

Utmost Savagery book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Utmost Savagery: The Three Days of Tarawa as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Now, Col. Joseph Alexander, a combat Marine himself, presents the full story of Tarawa in. . In his book, Utmost Savagery: The Three Days of Tarawa, author, Joseph H. Alexander provides a very readable narrative history of the events prior to, during and immediately after this historic battle. Marines; and Edson’s Raiders: The 1st Marine Raider Battalion in World War II.

In his book, Utmost Savagery: The Three Days of Tarawa, author, Joseph H. The book is repleate with detail, perhaps at times too much detail

In his book, Utmost Savagery: The Three Days of Tarawa, author, Joseph H. The book is repleate with detail, perhaps at times too much detail. It is well written and provides a very good description of the various characters involved. The battle is presented primarily from the American perspective, although there is some limited narration describing the Japanese point of view

In three days of fighting, four Americans would win the Medal of Honor and six thousand combatants would di. Now, Colonel Joseph Alexander, a combat marine himself, presents the full story of Tarawa in all its horror and glory: the extreme risks, the horrific combat, and the heroic breakthroughs.

In three days of fighting, four Americans would win the Medal of Honor and six thousand combatants would di.

Col Alexander's graphic narrative of the 3 day battle was clear, concise, and done in a novelistic style.

He makes plain that the assault on heavily defended Betio was strategically essential but included a number of tactical mistakes, such as too light a bombardment. Col Alexander's graphic narrative of the 3 day battle was clear, concise, and done in a novelistic style. It was very easy to read with the gritty feel of battle and terror of combat coming through loud and clear. Gripping at times as my heart broke for the men who endured this horrific ordeal.

Joseph Alexander does a great job in analyzing the battle in tremendous detail. The strategic developments leading to the battle are presented in sufficient detail to get a feeling for why the battle occurred. Both the American and Japanese sides are presented (the Japanese record, of course, being mostly lost) which combine to make the story even more interesting.

Marine combat veteran and award-winning military historian Joseph Alexander takes a fresh look at one of the bloodiest battles of the Pacific War. His gripping narrative, first published in 1995, has won him many prizes, with critics lauding his use of Japanese documents and his interpretation of the significance of what happened. The first trial by fire of America's fledgling amphibious assault doctrine, the violent three-day attack on Tarawa, a seemingly invincible Japanese island fortress of barely three hundred acres, left six thousand men dead. This book offers an authoritative account of the tactics, innovations, leadership, and weapons employed by both antagonists. Alexander convincingly argues that without the vital lessons of Tarawa the larger amphibious victories to come at Saipan, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa might not have been possible.

Jaiarton
Unfortunately the Americans had a lot to learn about landing on Pacific islands against dug in Japanese. The Japanese made numerous mistakes but errors happen to the Americans as well. Water depth was not checked out and reconnaissance was weak or totally missing. Putting artillery on near by islands that were not fortified would have saved American lives.

Tarawa was a huge learning experience for the Americans and they paid a high price. The Japanese also learn to dig in deep but their cost was almost all of their troops. The author has done excellent job describing the battle both the heroism and errors.
Quendant
This work is among the leading edge of history books in the past 20 years to put it all in perspective, give the reader the big picture and then the little pictures fill in the gaps.

I had a client tell me he had been at Tarawa. That stopped the interview. He was in the second wave. so had a better chance of survival, but still waded past the dead Marines to get to the beach.

I had a great uncle that fought there too. He had joined the Seabees thinking he would only be in a construction battalion. Not at Tarawa.

This book makes it so terribly intimate, like the stories of the survivors I have met.
Molotok
Well written and dColonel Alexander USMC Ret., explains the TOE (Table Of Organization) in detail as the Marine Corp and US Navy, sets out to take Tarawa away from the Japanese military. The battle was horrendous, and casualties, on both sides, devastating. It was one of the costliest battles of the Pacific War in loss of American fighting men ever recorded. The book is extremely well written and a must read for history buffs, or anyone who might find WWII Pacific Warfare interesting. I recommend this book without reservation.
DABY
This is a comprehensive examination of this significant battle, with a strong case made that great consequences hung on its outcome. Alexander provides good context to the operation from both the Japanese as well as the American strategic circumstances. There were considerable difficulties experienced by both sides. While the Americans seemed to have all the advantages, a good picture of the complexities of an amphibious assault is conveyed. It was extraordinarily easy for misunderstandings to occur between the services. Some of the equipment was essentially untried and communications, for both sides, was appalling.

The attack on Betio is rightly infamous because of the harrowing experience of many US marines. A shallow reef which surrounded the atoll caused havoc with many landing craft, forcing several battalions of marines to wade hundreds of yards through ferocious defensive fire. Astonishingly, for all the terrible carnage caused by the low tide, there were some remarkable compensations. A strength of Alexander's book is his finding that other, arguably worse outcomes were likely if the circumstances had been different. Indeed, despite the appalling carnage, 2nd Marine Division got a number of very fortuitous breaks. The key one being the untimely death of the Japanese commander on the first day.

Alexander's focus is on the commanders and the key units (with some very helpful explanations of the Japanese forces) and the decisions and actions taken. Excellent research has provided a fairly full account of the ebb and flow of the battle. While there are only a sprinkling of first-hand recollections by participating marines (it is not an oral history style of book and the lack of vivid material from the attacking marines is its only weakness), considerable coverage is given to the deeds of the Medal of Honour winners as well as to some of the other heroes. These strongly convey the level of courage required for the marines to prevail. Japanese perspectives are understandably harder to come across but there is some interesting material from several of the survivors. With their incredible fighting spirit, extensive preparation and number of weapons available, they were an incredibly formidable opponent. It all resulted in some of the most bitter fighting imaginable. There truly was no quarter. Everyone was trying to kill as many of their enemies as they could.

This is a very aptly named book. While in hindsight it seems clear the Americans were always going to win, it is chilling to consider that failure was a distinct possibility. The number of casualties among the assault troops was shocking and if the run of luck had gone Japan's way, disaster could have resulted, with enormous repercussions for any future amphibious landings. Considering that these were imperative in both theatres of war, the stakes were very high indeed. Highly recommended.
Hiclerlsi
An excellent and accurate account. Wonderful research with quotes from men that were there, all footnoted. Also a great addition to the first account of Tarawa by Robert Sherrod. It's going to bring tears, no matter how tough you think you may be.