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by Angus McBride,Stephen Turnbull
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Asia
  • Author:
    Angus McBride,Stephen Turnbull
  • ISBN:
    1841763047
  • ISBN13:
    978-1841763040
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Osprey Publishing; 1st Printing edition (March 25, 2002)
  • Pages:
    64 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Asia
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1592 kb
  • ePUB format
    1291 kb
  • DJVU format
    1477 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    137
  • Formats:
    mbr rtf azw lit


McBride's illustrations are perhaps the best I've seen so far in the Osprey Japan books - very atmospheric; they remind me of comic book artist Frank Miller's art (Ronin, 300, et.

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). McBride's illustrations are perhaps the best I've seen so far in the Osprey Japan books - very atmospheric; they remind me of comic book artist Frank Miller's art (Ronin, 300, et.

He has travelled extensively in the Far East, particularly in Japan and Korea, and is the author of a number of major books on the subject. He has contributed several titles to the Osprey Military list since his original Men-at-Arms 86, Samurai Armies 1550-1615, in 1979. If so, then naming this book as samurai heraldry is wrong! He should have used an appropriate Japanese term for this subject matter (what about Samurai Mon?), as was done for his book on Hatamoto. The archived material is a little flimsy, based on only a few defined paintings such as the Heike Monogatari.

Stephen Turnbull, Angus McBride. The dazzling spectacle presented by the armies of medieval Japan owed much to the highly developed family and personal heraldry of samurai society. From simple personal banners, this evolved over centuries of warfare into a complex system of flags worn or carried into battle, together with the striking 'great standards' of leading warlords. While not regulated in the Western sense, Japanese heraldry developed as a series of widely followed practices, while remaining flexible enough to embrace constant innovation.

The dazzling spectacle presented by the armies of medieval Japan owed much to the highly developed family and personal heraldry of samurai society.

Stephen Hardin, Angus McBride. Stephen Turnbull, Angus McBride. Категория: Исторические.

Samurai Heraldry - Elite N. 2 (Paperback). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. Turnbull (author), Angus McBride (illustrator). Britain's leading historian of Samurai warfare describes, explains and illustrates the strikingly colourful heraldry of the great warring families and their feudal armies in medieval Japan.

Samurai Heraldry - Stephen Turnbull. Elite, 82. Samurai Heraldry. Stephen Turnbull, Illustrated by Angus McBride. THROUGH THE ART AND SCIENCE of heraldry the armies of different ages and different regions around the world have been able to distinguish friend from foe in the confusion of battle.

Samurai Heraldry book. Stephen Turnbull, Angus McBride (Illustrations). Samurai Heraldry (Elite). Samurai Heraldry is another of Turnbull's books about the warriors of medieval Japan

Samurai Heraldry book. 1841763047 (ISBN13: 9781841763040). Samurai Heraldry is another of Turnbull's books about the warriors of medieval Japan. Like all the books published by Osprey publishing this is hardly the authoritative text on the subject, however like all Osprey books it packs a lot of information into a slim volume.

In 1953 Angus emigrated to South Africa

Angus McBride, one of the world's most respected historical illustrators, has contributed to more than 70 Osprey titles. He worked in advertising agencies from 1947, and is a self-taught artist. In 1953 Angus emigrated to South Africa. He came back to the UK in 1961, and has worked freelance ever since. With his family he returned to South Africa in 1976, since when he has lived and worked in Cape Town.

The dazzling spectacle presented by the armies of medieval Japan owed much to the highly developed family and personal heraldry of samurai society. From simple personal banners, this evolved over centuries of warfare into a complex system of flags worn or carried into battle, together with the striking 'great standards' of leading warlords. While not regulated in the Western sense, Japanese heraldry developed as a series of widely followed practices, while remaining flexible enough to embrace constant innovation. Scores of examples, in monochrome and full colour, illustrate this fascinating explanation of the subject by a respected expert on all aspects of samurai culture.

Garr
This is a text on the history of heraldry in Japan. If you are searching for family crests, this is not helpful...nor is it complete. It is, however, a useful reference.

A good book on the various family crests and their meaning is a mis-titled book, *The Elements of Japanese Design* by John W. Dower. Another good book is *Family Crests of Japan* by ICG Muse, Inc...no author...published in Japan.

After you find your family crest, you can research the history and that can be interesting. Turnbull's book will demonstrate the various displays of the crest and when and where it can be used. If you know what part of Japan your family originated, you might be able to trace the daimyo (feudal lord) that your family served or is a branch of.
Xanzay
I've been reading Turnbull's other Osprey books; after having read "War in Japan" (a good introduction), then the more detailed "Kawanakajima" (good close-up on a "battle"), I turned to this book.
I'm glad I read the books in the order I did. Without having a feel for what role the ashigaru or the samurai leaders (bodyguards, commanders, etc.), I think I would have been lost reading this book. You probably need to know how armies went into battle, in what order, for what purpose to pick up on the nuances here. This book expands on the material aspects of the soldier only briefly touched upon in the other books. Little detailed sections like "Religious Symbolism in Heraldry" and "The Common People" (with its discussion of how mon heraldry was forbidden to the people, kabuki)) -- very interesting.
Out of the Osprey books I've read or browsed so far, this one avoids the series' #1 sin: recycling. Most of the pictures and artwork are fresh so I feel like there is some value in having it. It's a nice read to understand how the armies appeared on the battlefield, in their camps, in the castles, etc.
McBride's illustrations are perhaps the best I've seen so far in the Osprey Japan books -- very atmospheric; they remind me of comic book artist Frank Miller's art (Ronin, 300, etc.).
3/5 stars: probably only for the history or wargaming buff.
Anen
Every thing you expect in a Osprey book.
Vetibert
Just as advertised.
Cordanius
Came on time, which is good because it was a birthday gift for my wife who loves all things Japanese.
Inth
I have just read this together with the Hatamoto book in the same series by the same author. Collectively, both books deal with all the insignia as carried on flags, standards, curtains and costumes as worn by the Samurai warriors.

However, the author states early on that there is no heraldry in the Western sense, only badges (mons) colours and some unusual standards. If so, then naming this book as samurai heraldry is wrong! He should have used an appropriate Japanese term for this subject matter (what about Samurai Mon?), as was done for his book on Hatamoto.

The archived material is a little flimsy, based on only a few defined paintings such as the Heike Monogatari. The earliest flags were red for the Taira and white for the Minamoto. Then later, stylised mons (motifs) appeared representing specific samurai families. A few examples are given (too few in my opinion). Later and during the Edo period dominated by the singular hollyhock mon, various other new mons were created for ordinary people and businesses. That's it!

There is a two-page section on how to represent these heraldry in wargames (which is totally unnecessary).
Wanenai
Wonderful book from Stephen Turnbull. A lot of useful encyclopedic information with glossary of main terms and graphical illustrations in each page. Color illustrations are given separately that a little bit not very convenient otherwise this is a very unique book. I also have other Stephen Turnbull books and I like the way how he efficiently gives a huge information even in the thin book like this. Victoria Lando