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by Richard Sisson
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Asia
  • Author:
    Richard Sisson
  • ISBN:
    0520062809
  • ISBN13:
    978-0520062801
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of California Press (1990)
  • Pages:
    338 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Asia
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1621 kb
  • ePUB format
    1893 kb
  • DJVU format
    1314 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    264
  • Formats:
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The birth of Bangladesh (earlier East Pakistan) and the India-Pakistan conflict of 1971 were covered by many writers from . Richard Sisson and Leo E Rose do just that.

The birth of Bangladesh (earlier East Pakistan) and the India-Pakistan conflict of 1971 were covered by many writers from India and Pakistan. Despite best efforts, the narratives tend to differ significantly and the subject merits an objective analysis by unbiased scholars who understand the region. Interesting snippets from this excellent book

Sisson, Richard; Rose, Leo E. (Leo Eugene). Los Angeles ; Oxford : University of California Press.

Sisson, Richard; Rose, Leo E. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Similarly, the Bangladesh war, the third between India and Pakistan during their first quarter century of independence, was neither expected nor judged necessary by any of the major players before early fall of 1971. This is not to say that war was entirely unanticipated or, indeed, that it came as much of a surprise. India and Pakistan both had long-standing contingency plans for war, and as the crisis escalated in the summer of 1971, the possibility of war was openly referred to by leaders of both states.

War and Secession Pakistan, India, and the Creation of Bangladesh. A decade after the 1971 wars in South Asia, the principal decisionmakers were still uncertain why wars so clearly unwanted had occurred. by Richard Sisson (Author), Leo E. Rose (Author). The authors reconstruct the complex decisionmaking process attending the break-up of Pakistan and the subsequent war between India and Pakistan.

Mobile version (beta). War and Secession: Pakistan, India, and the Creation of Bangladesh. Download (pdf, . 1 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The Pakistan National Congress also stood against the growth of Islamic . a b c Richard Sisson, Leo E. Rose (1991). War and Secession: Pakistan, India and the Creation of Bangladesh.

The Pakistan National Congress also stood against the growth of Islamic fundamentalism in Pakistani society, politics and government. University of California Press. ISBN 978-0-520-07665-5.

The authors reconstruct the complex decisionmaking process attending the break-up of Pakistan and the subsequent war between India and Pakistan.

A decade after the 1971 wars in South Asia, the principal decisionmakers were still uncertain why wars so clearly unwanted had occurred. Much of their data derive from interviews conducted with principal players in each of the countries immediately involved-Pakistan, India, and Indira Gandhi and leaders of the Awami League in Bangladesh. Categories: History\Military History.

Richard Sisson's scientific contributions. Publications (4).

War and Secession: Pakistan, India, and the Creation of Bangladesh by Richard Sisson. this book is about the politics of the country. how pakistan tried to manipulate the people of bangladesh and how did us, ussr, india and china did in 1971 crisis. the Pakistani forces began a genocide which lasted from March to December 1971. sheikh mujib, the father of the nation was arrested after he won the general election. General Yahya Khan is recorded as saying in fury: Kill three million of them, and the rest will eat out of our hands. Ten million fled to India; 30 million left the cities and went to the villages.

A decade after the 1971 wars in South Asia, the principal decisionmakers were still uncertain why wars so clearly unwanted had occurred. The authors reconstruct the complex decisionmaking process attending the break-up of Pakistan and the subsequent war between India and Pakistan. Much of their data derive from interviews conducted with principal players in each of the countries immediately involved-Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh-including Indira Gandhi and leaders of the Awami League in Bangladesh.

Nalmergas
The birth of Bangladesh (earlier East Pakistan) and the India-Pakistan conflict of 1971 were covered by many writers from India and Pakistan. Despite best efforts, the narratives tend to differ significantly and the subject merits an objective analysis by unbiased scholars who understand the region.

Richard Sisson and Leo E Rose do just that. Both are scholars in political sciences (Sisson headed Ohio State University and Rose taught at Berkeley); and both specialized in South Asia (with several books to their credit).

Interesting snippets from this excellent book:

The territorial disputes between India and Pakistan are the result of "a hastily devised and extremely sloppy" partitioning of India. Contiguity, will of the ruler and will of the people were to be heeded in deciding who goes where. Pakistan had differing principles for different regions. Pakistan preferred will of the ruler in Junagadh and Hyderabad (where the ruler was Muslim and the people Hindus) and will of the people in Kashmir (where the ruler was Hindu and people Muslim). India had the opposite view. India annexed the first two by force and Kashmir in a controversial accession. The 1949 war between the two young nations over Kashmir resulted in a ceasefire line splitting Kashmir into two parts: Pakistan held Kashmir and India held Kashmir. In the 1965 war, India made deep inroads into PHK; but had to give up territory gained under the Tashkent peace treaty.

The first free and fair elections in Pakistan in 1970 resulted in "a majority party with a regional agenda and a minority party with a national agenda". One argued for majority's will to prevail and a weak federation. Another argued for right to participate in government based on "concurrent majority of two separate interests". Bhutto represented a region and had a national program. Mujib represented the nation and had a regional program. Military dictator Yahya Khan could not devise a solution and unleashed armed force against Bengalis when they expressed angst at continuing inaction. (Sisson and Rose say that while Bengalis suffered as a result, the Indian claims of "genocide" are exaggerated).

Pakistan made several miscalculations:
1. That the Bengalis in the East will submit quickly to armed force. They did not. Bengalis fought back. Their Mukthi Bahini grew to a size of 100,000 fighters. They liberated Bangladesh from Pakistan.
2. That India will not intervene in the conflict. India intervened.
3. That Hindu India's army is no match for Pakistan army drawn from the martial warrior community of Punjab Muslims. In the end Pakistan Army surrendered to three Generals of a secular India: a Parsi, a Sikh and a Jew!
4. That China will intervene to restrain India in the event of hostilities. China did not. India knew (from intercepted communication) that China promised political support but declined to provide military support to Pakistan. Additionally India's treaty with the Soviet Union deterred China from any intervention. India was confident enough to move 6 of the 10 battalions from its borders with China to its borders with Pakistan.
5. That a conflict in Western border would distract India. It did not. India took back several territories in PHK and the new 1971 "line of control" replaced the earlier 1949 "cease fire line".

The authors observe a few ironies: Decision making in India was institutionalized and controlled by incumbents "who had been there before". Decision makers in Pakistan labored under severe and self-admitted stress. Democratic India had "strong and consistent" control over the crisis. Authoritarian Pakistan was relatively "weak and inconsistent". India was the "hard" state; Pakistan was the "soft" state. Pakistan's policy (with Awami League and later with India) was reflexive and more focused on denying India satisfaction than achieving a domestic resolution - an incorrect priority that lost the country a region, a border and some reputation.
Drelalen
One of the rare objective analyses of the war of cessation. Particularly good for Pakistani readers who are still in the dark or denial about Mr. Bhutto's role in the breakup of Pakistan. Personal greed indeed played out the dreams of Mr. Patel, Mr. Nehru and the like who waited in their lifetime to see the disintegration of Pakistan, a wish that Mr. Bhutto fulfilled long after. In the final analysis, it is not religion that holds a multicultural nation together but respect and shared dreams. Pakistanis may take a note of this before it is too late for them again.
Ynonno
Thank you for the quality buying experience
Kerahuginn
This "unbiased," thoroughly researched account, has all the feel of hermetically-sealed academia. While reading "War and Secession" I kept trying to account for the authors' strangely sterile analysis of one of the most outrageous and shameful unravelling of the democratic processes in recent history. I can only assume that neither of the authors spent much time in Pakistan or Bangladesh previous to their research trips for interview purposes. Their sometimes painfully detailed account is limited to the bureaucratic and military chambers of power and is curiously drained of the flesh and blood of the real historic situation. Academic "objectivity" actually becomes less objective by not adequately indicating the real consequences of the dry political struggles. This becomes especially evident halfway through the book when, astoundingly, after spending a long chapter detailing final negotiations, the skip ENTIRELY any details of what the infamous military crackdown of March 25, 1971 actually entailed, in terms of the brutal extermination of tens of thousands of Bengali civilians.

The authors' subtle anti-Indian bias and curious defensiveness of Nixon-Kissinger becomes more apparent in the last third of the book. I was expecting a case study in conflict resolution (or some such thing), but kept wondering why they wrote this book. The final "Interpretations," when I finally got to it, was a disappointment. It offered no new insights or thought-provoking analysis, or, most pointedly, suggestions for how to avoid, or more constructively intevene in, such conflicts in the future.

This is definitely NOT a book for the general reader, as the authors not only write in a dry, typically old-fashioned academic style, but seem to assume readers' familiarity with the situation. For example, they switch from referring to the capital of Pakistan as "Rawalpindi" to "Islamabad" without explanation, and similarly offer the first use of the term "Bangladesh" without quotes or context.

There are also a few minor factual errors that don't change the book's value for its detailed account or the overall import of the history it describes, but do make me wonder why they didn't use a fact-checker (standard procedure, I thought, for a major scholarly work). For example, they describe the "major" cyclone of "October" 1970, which in fact took place on November 12-13; and then procede to give no indication of the singular, historic nature of this cyclone, which killed at least 250,000 people in the Ganges Delta OVERNIGHT.

Overall, this book provides some valuable "primary source" information for specialists, with insights into why the war happened, but little acknowledgement of its probable inevitability, given the arbitrary divisions of post-British Partition. Regarding the Pakistan Army, Shuja Nawaz's Crossed Swords: Pakistan, Its Army, and the Wars Within (Oxford Pakistan Paperbacks) (2008) is a far better resource. Alas, the definitive book about the 1971 Bangladesh war of independence has yet to be written.
SiIеnt
The authors have pieced together the political context of creation of Bangladesh. A very well documented book
Malara
Wonderful read. A must read for people/students of Pakistan and Bangladesh
Cheber
Sisson and Rose present a thorough analysis of the policy decisions of the involved governments that led to the creation of Bangladesh as an independent country. The authors describe the issues and events that faced the leaders of the respective governments and their actions. Of note, the book does not describe the events that occurred to the people of Bangaldesh during the war.