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by Edward Seidensticker
Download Low City, High City: Tokyo from Edo to the Earthquake: how the shogun's ancient capital became a great modern city, 1867-1923 fb2
Asia
  • Author:
    Edward Seidensticker
  • ISBN:
    0674539397
  • ISBN13:
    978-0674539396
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harvard University Press; Reprint edition (September 1, 1991)
  • Pages:
    302 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Asia
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1582 kb
  • ePUB format
    1320 kb
  • DJVU format
    1478 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    937
  • Formats:
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Low City, High City book.

Low City, High City book. Tokyo in the years between the Meiji Restoration and the Earthquake of 1923 is one of these.

Seidensticker, Edward. Harvard University Press. ISBN 978-0-674-53939-6. Nipon o daï itsi ran; ou, Annales des empereurs du Japon. Paris: Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland. Watanabe, Hiroshi (April 25, 2001).

In Low City, High City: Tokyo from Edo to the Earthquake (1983) and Tokyo Rising: The City Since the Great Earthquake (1990), Seidensticker's two-volume history of Tokyo, he weaves a tale of cultural history of how the city was impacted by the advent of Westernization, and how i. .

In Low City, High City: Tokyo from Edo to the Earthquake (1983) and Tokyo Rising: The City Since the Great Earthquake (1990), Seidensticker's two-volume history of Tokyo, he weaves a tale of cultural history of how the city was impacted by the advent of Westernization, and how it responded to the twin disasters of the 20th Century-the. Great Kanto earthquake of 1923 and the massive destruction incurred in World War II due to Allied bombing raids.

And Seidensticker’s Tokyo starts in the Low City and moves out with it to embrace Asakusa. He remembered how mu. ch nicer the young people of Showa Japan had seemed, those he had formerly criticized just as bitterly

And Seidensticker’s Tokyo starts in the Low City and moves out with it to embrace Asakusa. Much of these two volumes is dominated by the demise of the Low City and all that it stood for, until, that is, more recent years, when the deed is all but done and Asakusa consigned to the role of outpost for tourists. ch nicer the young people of Showa Japan had seemed, those he had formerly criticized just as bitterly. And we often (like Kafu, like all old people) remembered a kind of beauty which, whether or not it had actually existed, lived on in us.

Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. pp. 8 and 9. a b c d e f g h Edogaku Jiten, Kōbunsha, 1984, pages 14, 15, and 16.

Seidensticker focuses on Tokyo in the years between the Meiji Restoration and the earthquake of 1923 to illustrate this change

Seidensticker focuses on Tokyo in the years between the Meiji Restoration and the earthquake of 1923 to illustrate this change.

The city around me is thrown into a new light by Seidensticker's history, and I imagine that this kind of perspective would be very hard for Westerners to come by through other sources, unless your Japanese reading skills are excellent.

The rest of the article is based on the leaflet given to visitors at The Shitamachi Museum (English version).

This book looks at the metamorphosis of Japan from a country with little contact with the outside world to one brimming with Western ideas and technologies. Seidensticker focuses on Tokyo in the years between the Meiji Restoration and the earthquake of 1923 to illustrate this change. He shows how Tokyo, which was called Edo until 1867, emerged from being the shogun's capital and the biggest city in a country which had been closed to the outside world for two and a half centuries, to a modern city, open to Western ideas.

Jan
This is an excellent book, revealing the impact of the Meiji Reforms on the urban landscape. Tokyo as the book opens is still very much the shogunate capital of Edo. The "high city" in the title is the elite precincts of the town. The low city is the dynamic area where Japanese culture, the Japan of Kabuki, the Yoshiwara, and the woodblock print industry thrived.
Y
The low city was profoundly affected by the Meiji reforms, but as Professor Seidensticker points out, natural disasters, such as floods and fires could also impact both art and commerce. While the geisha and the Kabuki actor were the celebrities of Edo, Tokyo in the early 20th century was likely as much as to idealize the baseball player and the film star. New institutions such as the department store and new centers of gravity such as the Ginza were as much a result of the Meiji era change as the adaptation of western attire.

Seidensticker is one of the leading translators of Japanese literature and he weaves accounts of the changes to Tokyo during this period, memoirs and short stories. This is a bit of a bonus as it provides material for further reading, particularly Tanizaki's memoirs. This is a marvelous account of Tokyo up to the earthquake of 1923, when all that was built, with the famous exception of Frank Lloyd Wright's Imperial Hotel, would have to be rebuilt.
Mightsinger
When I was a teenager, I got a summer scholarhip to go live with a Japanese family in Tokyo. The experience changed me forever. Though America long remained the center of my daily life, Japan became for many years, "the alternate world". Japanese culture and the Japanese language fascinated me and I studied both for many years. I subsequently returned to Japan several times and have remained in contact with that family all my life. I'm now sixty-five. The Tokyo I first saw was only 36 years after the great earthquake of 1923 and only 14 years after the catastrophe of World War II. So it is that when I read Seidensticker's account of Tokyo, bits and pieces bob up from the flow of memory, my underground impressions and experiences not-quite-recalled, especially sounds and sights no longer to be found in the Tokyo of today. I found it most engrossing. LOW CITY, HIGH CITY is a local history---mostly of downtown Tokyo where in the Tokugawa period, the Edo culture flourished most. The author traces the tastes and tendencies of the townsmen, and how these changed under the giant wave of Western influence that began after the Meiji Reformation of 1868. He takes the process up to the Kanto Earthquake, which came just three years before the Taisho Emperor died and the Showa era (one of the most momentous in Japan's long history) started.

This is the first part of a longer history of Tokyo, but it may be read on its own. Seidensticker, who died in 2007, was an esteemed translator of Japanese literature, both ancient and modern, who lived there. If you have no acquaintance of Tokyo at all, you will find LOW CITY, HIGH CITY heavy going, I fear. That's because he talks about the city districts, sections, streets, rivers, and parks and how they all changed over time, through numerous devastations by fire, flood, earthquake, and the wish to "be modern". You will find yourself aching for better maps than the two provided which show only broad outlines. The process by which Tokyo, and Japan, transformed itself from a remote Asian city (say in 1850) to one of the centers of the modern world (say by 1970) is a fascinating tale. This book helps reveal to Western readers what happened. Transportation, cultural life, literature, architecture, parks, recreations, land use, prostitution and coffee houses-----the list of topics is nearly endless. Like any local history, the mass of detail sometimes obscures the larger processes and themes. The Low City, by the harbor and along the Sumida River, had been the heart of Edo culture, but by the end of Meiji (1912), it had given way to the High City, that newer section of Tokyo on ridges and hills that surrounded the Low and stretched away south and west, the greater part of modern Tokyo. If you know Tokyo at all, you're going to find a huge amount of interesting and sometimes amusing detail in this well-written book. If you don't, perhaps this is not the place to begin because his weaving and bobbing, jumping around, produce a collage effect rather than a single, direct line to follow.
Ballalune
A very readable and impressionistic discussion of the changes in Tokyo from the inauguration of the Meiji period to the great Tokyo earthquake of 1923. Based on Seidensticker's deep knowledge of Tokyo, Japanese literature, study of old guidebooks, and memoirs, this book attempts to chart the evolution of Tokyo from administrative capital of a semi-feudal state to a modernizing city. This is also partially a social history of Tokyo. Seidensticker adopts a combined chronological and geographic approach, using a roughly temporal sequence and traveling through many of the different parts of Tokyo to describe the changes across time. Its clear from his account that the combination of modernization and recurrent disasters of which the Earthquake was the greatest, destroyed much of Edo period Tokyo and what was left was finished off by American bombing during WWII. Seidensticker appears to be particularly fond of the popular culture of the Meiji and much of this book can be seen as a something of an elegy for that culture. This is not a systematic history. Demography, major changes in city planning, changes in governance are really mentioned only in passing. Seidensticker is a fine writer and much of this book is enjoyable reading but it tends to leave readers wishing for more structure and analysis.
MarF
This author is a fine stylist, as promised. He gives us a great deal of insight into Tokyo and it metamorphosis from local capital to world center...circa his 1980 perspective.

It would be wonderful to have this level of knowledge distilled into a book more neutrally organized and with comparisons to a more up-to-date Tokyo, but we have what we have.

There is no other. This is it. Buy it now.
Uste
Low City, High City is a lively and informal account of Tokyo's history from the end of the Tokugawa regime (in 1868) to the destruction of the city in the 1923 Kanto earthquake. During that half century, Tokyo was transformed from a feudal pre-industrial city of samurai and commoners to an imperial capital of bureacrats, businessmen, factory workers, and flappers. Seidensticker, a distinguished translator of Japanese literature, has written a highly readable cultural and social history of Tokyo that captures the colorful introduction of "Western" urbanism and chronicles the slowly fading old city. An absolute must for anyone with even a casual interest in Tokyo's past.