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by Sun Jung
Download Korean Masculinities and Transcultural Consumption: Yonsama, Rain, Oldboy, K-Pop Idols (TransAsia Screen Cultures Series) fb2
Asia
  • Author:
    Sun Jung
  • ISBN:
    9888028677
  • ISBN13:
    978-9888028672
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hong Kong University Press; 1st edition (January 2, 2011)
  • Pages:
    232 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Asia
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1931 kb
  • ePUB format
    1122 kb
  • DJVU format
    1560 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    681
  • Formats:
    mbr doc azw mobi


South Korean masculinities have enjoyed dramatic influence in pan-Asian popular culture, which travels freely due to. .I would have enjoyed at least a chapter on Korean reactions to K-pop products

South Korean masculinities have enjoyed dramatic influence in pan-Asian popular culture, which travels freely due to its non-nationalistic appeal. This book investigates transcultural consumption of three iconic figures the middle aged Japanese female fandom of actor Bae Yong-Joon, the Western online cult fandom of the horror film Oldboy, and the Singaporean fandom of the popstar Rain. I would have enjoyed at least a chapter on Korean reactions to K-pop products. 5 people found this helpful.

Series: TransAsia: Screen Cultures. South Korean popular culture has circulated globally since the late 1990s. Published by: Hong Kong University Press. 1 Korean Popular Culture and Transcultural Consumption: Globalized Desires between Ours and Others. Broadly, its global popularity can be observed in two major cultural phenomena: Hallyu (한류, 韓流), which is more evident in the Asian region; and cult fandom of the Korean genre film, which is more evident in the West. The literal translation of Hallyu is Korean Wave and this term refers to the regional popularity of South Korean cultural products.

TransAsia: Screen Cultures. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2011. Dr. Jung’s book focuses on how women respond to and interpret new Korean masculinities in various Asian regions. This book consists of five chapters. The first chapter discusses theoretical concepts through examination of recent Korean blockbuster films as a transnational hybrid form.

Title: Korean Masculinities and Transcultural. Publisher: Hong Kong University Press.

This book investigates transcultural consumption of three iconic figures the middle aged Japanese female fandom of actor Bae Yong-Joon, the Western online cult fandom of the horror film Oldboy, and the Singaporean fandom o.

This book investigates transcultural consumption of three iconic figures the middle aged Japanese female fandom of actor Bae Yong-Joon, the Western online cult fandom of the horror film Oldboy, and the Singaporean fandom of the popstar Rain. Word Wise: Not Enabled. Screen Reader: Supported. Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled.

Start by marking Korean Masculinities and Transcultural Consumption: Yonsama, Rain, Oldboy, K-Pop Idols (TransAsia: Screen Cultures) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In the concluding chapter, the author also discusses recently emerging versatile masculinity within the transcultural pop production paradigm represented by K-pop idol boy bands.

This book investigates the transcultural consumption of hybrid South Korean masculinities in.

This book investigates the transcultural consumption of hybrid South Korean masculinities in contemporary South Korean popular culture. It focuses on the Japanese middle-aged female fandom of an actor-Bae Yong-Joon (. Yonsama)-the middle class Singaporean female fandom of a pop-star Rain, and the Western online cult fandom of a film, Oldboy. oceedings{Jung2010KoreanMA, title {Korean Masculinities and Transcultural Consumption: Yonsama, Rain, Oldboy, K-Pop Idols}, author {Sun Jung}, year {2010} }. Sun Jung.

Oldboy and how Korean masculinity is seen through Oldboy, there was more a focus on the "otherness" and .

Oldboy and how Korean masculinity is seen through Oldboy, there was more a focus on the "otherness" and "coolness" perceived through "neo-Orientalism" (which, I get, would probably not have been perceived the same way if the main character of Oldboy was a female but it would have helped to have it pointed out more how that pertains to the "masculinity" aspect an.

Keywords: rain, Sun Jung, Korean Masculinities, Hong Kong, Pop Idols, Transcultural Consumption.

Электронная книга "Korean Masculinities and Transcultural Consumption: Yonsama, Rain, Oldboy, K-Pop Idols", Sun Jung. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Korean Masculinities and Transcultural Consumption: Yonsama, Rain, Oldboy, K-Pop Idols" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

South Korean masculinities have enjoyed dramatically greater influence in recent years in many realms of pan-Asian popular culture, which travels freely in part because of its hybrid trans-nationalistic appeal. This book investigates transcultural consumption of three iconic figures ― the middle-aged Japanese female fandom of actor Bae Yong-Joon, the Western online cult fandom of the thriller film Oldboy, and the Singaporean fandom of the pop-star Rain. Through these three specific but hybrid contexts, the author develops the concepts of soft masculinity, as well as global and postmodern variants of masculine cultural impacts. In the concluding chapter, the author also discusses recently emerging versatile masculinity within the transcultural pop production paradigm represented by K-pop idol boy bands.

Landarn
After having previously read Pop Goes Korea, I was pleased by the further information contained in 'Korean Masculinities'. I an Asian entertainment writer whose focus is primarily directed towards K-Pop. I particularly enjoyed the focus on Bi Rain, who remains an iconic and global figure in Korean entertainment. His evolution to stardom through the tutelage of JYP Entertainment's founder Park Jin Young is clearly defined, as well as the motivational factors behind the creation of his image.
Amerikan_Volga
I was reading this book in hopes of gaining insight on masculinity in South Korea, and I did, a bit, but the author is really just interested in explaining why certain K-pop products have become popular internationally. The Chapters start out alright and get progressively weaker as it goes along, I couldn't even read the chapter on Oldboy's "cool but savage" masculinity. Jung argues from a cultural constructionist perspective which is fine but misses out on some further interpretations and places too much on the connection between girls comics in japan and soft masculinity. even if those comics never existed, women would still idealize soft masculinity in its current form. I would have enjoyed at least a chapter on Korean reactions to K-pop products. I would say chapter 2 and 3 can provide some insights but the rest isn't worth your time or money, way overpriced for what you get.
Munigrinn
I haven't read this book. If I bought it, I'd mostly use it as something to argue against, not as an inspirational example of scholarship or as a citation that supports my points. This rather harsh judgment is based on having read an article that is an earlier version of the author's thoughts on Korean masculinity. The article was so poorly researched and the understanding of Korean culture so obviously out of touch with contemporary reality (I don't think the author has spent enough time in Korea in the last decade to make such giant pronouncements) that I was shocked. For example the author bases an argument about perceptions of masculinity on the comments on Youtube videos written by ESL teenagers that identify certain pop stars as "hot."

I am prompted to write this review because I'm sick of Amazon suggesting I buy the book, and I wonder how many others with similar interests might waste their money...