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by Mark J Hudson
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Asia
  • Author:
    Mark J Hudson
  • ISBN:
    0824819306
  • ISBN13:
    978-0824819309
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Univ of Hawaii Pr; illustrated edition edition (September 1, 1999)
  • Pages:
    323 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Asia
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1729 kb
  • ePUB format
    1400 kb
  • DJVU format
    1625 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    640
  • Formats:
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This book is excellent for those who want a survey of Japanese archaeological literature for the Jomon and Yayoi periods

This book is excellent for those who want a survey of Japanese archaeological literature for the Jomon and Yayoi periods. If I were grading this as a paper, I would give Hudson a C+. He's definitely compiled a great deal of information and cites all of his sources well, but he lacks the ability to present this information in a clear, concise, and organized fashion. I honestly cannot think of anyone who would benefit in any way from reading this.

Accordingly, Hudson considers post-Yayoi ethnogenesis in Japan within the East . The first is the development of food production in the Islands.

Accordingly, Hudson considers post-Yayoi ethnogenesis in Japan within the East Asian world system, examining the role of interaction between core and periphery in the formation of new ethnic identities, such as the Ainu.

Ruins of Identity book. In its examination of the processes of ethnogenesis (the formation of ethnic groups) in the Japanese Islands, Ruins of Identity offers an approach Many Japanese people consider themselves to be part of an essentially unchanging and isolated ethnic unit in which the biological, linguistic, and cultural aspects of Japanese identity overlap almost completely with each other.

Mark James Hudson (born 10 July 1963, in Roade) is a British archaeologist interested in multicultural Japan. Ruins of identity: Ethnogenesis in the Japanese Islands. University of Hawaii Press. His initial areas of specialization were the Jōmon period and the Yayoi period. He excavated the Nagabaka site on Miyako Island.

Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 1999. ix 336 p. illustrations, maps, bibliography, index. In his formulation, it is placed in a major immigration of rice-farming people from adjacent Korea about 300–200 . TheJomon hunter-gatherers who had occupied the islands for thousands of years before were not Japanese, but rather Ainu ancestors who Asian Perspectives, Vol. 39, No. 1–2, ( 2001 by University of Hawai‘i Press.

Many Japanese people consider themselves to be part of an essentially unchanging and isolated ethnic unit in. .

Many Japanese people consider themselves to be part of an essentially unchanging and isolated ethnic unit in which the biological, linguistic, and cultural aspects of Japanese identity overlap almost completely with each other. In its examination of the processes of ethnogenesis (the formation of ethnic groups) in the Japanese Islands, Ruins of Identity offers an approach to ethnicity that differs fundamentally from that found in most Japanese scholarship and popular discourse.

Honolulu: University of Hawai& Press, 1999. Hudson tackles the complicated and controversial issue of Japanese ethnic identity, specifically when it was formed and under what conditions, what he calls ethnogenesis. He argues that this process occurred in two stages

Ruins of Identity: Ethnogenesis in the Japanese Islands. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1999.

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Ruins of Identity: Ethnogensis in the Japanese Islands by Mark James Hudson, deals .

Ruins of Identity: Ethnogensis in the Japanese Islands by Mark James Hudson, deals with the origin of the Japanese people. Ainu Ethnogenesis and the East Asian World-System", continues in the same theme in its discourse on the Ainu, the central point being that the Ainu were formed in relationship and interaction with the Japanese. A litany of elements of the Ainu "cultural complex" were presented, such as their ceremonies and material culture.

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Many Japanese people consider themselves to be part of an essentially unchanging and isolated ethnic unit in which the biological, linguistic, and cultural aspects of Japanese identity overlap almost completely with each other. In its examination of the processes of ethnogenesis (the formation of ethnic groups) in the Japanese Islands, Ruins of Identity offers an approach to ethnicity that differs fundamentally from that found in most Japanese scholarship and popular discourse. Following an extensive discussion of previous theories on the formation of Japanese language, race, and culture and the nationalistic ideologies that have affected research in these topics, Mark Hudson presents a model of a core Japanese population based on the dual origin hypothesis currently favored by physical anthropologists. According to this model, the Jomon population, which was present in Japan by at least the end of the Pleistocene, was followed by agriculturalists from the Korean peninsula during the Yayoi period (ca. 400 BC to AD 300). Hudson analyzes further evidence of migrations and agricultural colonization in an impressive summary of recent cranial, dental, and genetic studies and in a careful examination of the linguistic and archaeological records.

The final sections of the book explore the cultural construction of Japanese ethnicity. Cultural aspects of ethnicity do not emerge pristine and fully formed but are the result of cumulative negotiation. Ethnic identity is continually recreated through interaction within and without the society concerned. Such a view necessitates an approach to culture change that takes into account complex interactions with a larger system. Accordingly, Hudson considers post-Yayoi ethnogenesis in Japan within the East Asian world system, examining the role of interaction between core and periphery in the formation of new ethnic identities, such as the Ainu. He argues that the defining elements of the Ainu period and culture (ca. AD 1200) can be linked directly to a dramatic expansion in Japanese trade goods flowing north as Hokkaido became increasingly exploited by core regions to the south.

Highly original and at times controversial, Ruins of Identity will be essential reading for students and scholars in Japanese studies and will be of interest to anthropologists and historians working on ethnicity in other parts of the world.

Text adopted at University ofChicago


Hugifyn
This book is excellent for those who want a survey of Japanese archaeological literature for the Jomon and Yayoi periods. The author reviews the development of archaeological theories in Japan, as well as among the few Western scholars specializing in Japanese prehistory. If you don't know much about Japanese archaeology, and especially if you don't read Japanese and can't go to the primary sources, this book is a great place to start.
Although the title sounds postmodern, in fact this book is cultural-historical in its emphasis. The author advocates a multidisciplinary approach to the question of Japanese ethnogenesis and supports his opinions with an extensive bibliography.
Particularly interesting to me is the way that (according to the author) Japanese archaeological theory has mirrored the nation's recent political history. Too bad archaeologists so often fail to be reflexive about the history of theory in their OWN countries.
Kuve
While reading this book, I couldn't help but think I was reading someone's senior project.

The book is an unholy mess of thousands of strands of information from a respectable amount of sources, loosely bound together by the promise that all of this information is relevant to the point the author is trying to make. As for what that point was? Who knows with the majority of the book contradicting itself or flat out saying everything you just read for the last three pages has no evidence supporting it and is probably completely wrong. The only strong argument Hudson seems to make in the entire book is that no one knows anything or agrees on anything for one reason or another, and even if they did, future evidence will completely change everything anyway.

If I were grading this as a paper, I would give Hudson a C+. He's definitely compiled a great deal of information and cites all of his sources well, but he lacks the ability to present this information in a clear, concise, and organized fashion.

I honestly cannot think of anyone who would benefit in any way from reading this.