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by David Morgan
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Asia
  • Author:
    David Morgan
  • ISBN:
    0631135561
  • ISBN13:
    978-0631135562
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Blackwell Publishers; Reprinted edition (November 27, 1986)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Asia
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1539 kb
  • ePUB format
    1782 kb
  • DJVU format
    1687 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    721
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by. David Morgan (Author). In this classic history, David Morgan explains how the vast Mongolian Empire was organized and governed, examining the religious and political character of the steppe nomadic society. He assesses the astonishing military career of Chingiz (Genghis) Khan, considers the nature of Mongol imperial government, and the effects of Mongol campaigns on the countries and peoples they conquered in China, Russia, Persia and Europe.

The Mongols (Peoples of Europe). The author of this book, David Morgan, though, leans toward the older view, and states that the Mongols refrained from the mass extermination of subject peoples only because those peoples could be taxed

The Mongols (Peoples of Europe). 0631175636 (ISBN13: 9780631175636). The author of this book, David Morgan, though, leans toward the older view, and states that the Mongols refrained from the mass extermination of subject peoples only because those peoples could be taxed. The weakness of this book, as is the case with any general survey of a broad topic, is that it does not provide much detail on any of the areas of Mongol life it examines.

David Morgan has written a fascinating book on the history of the Mongols and Genghis Khan. The book provides an overview of the government, religion, and politics of the Mongolian Empire and provides a very good start to understanding the Mongols

David Morgan has written a fascinating book on the history of the Mongols and Genghis Khan. The book provides an overview of the government, religion, and politics of the Mongolian Empire and provides a very good start to understanding the Mongols. This is an excellent source to learn about one of the greatest military and social leaders in history, and is recommended for anyone who seeks a greater understanding of role of the Mongols in world history. Sober Evaluation of the Mongols. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 13 years ago.

David Nicole notes in The Mongol Warlords: "terror and . Chinese Migrations: The Movement of People, Goods, and Ideas over Four Millennia.

David Nicole notes in The Mongol Warlords: "terror and mass extermination of anyone opposing them was a well-tested Mongol tactic". Such was the fate of resisting Arab muslim communities during the invasions of the Khwarezmid Empire.

by. Morgan, David, 1945-. Study of Mongol history - Nomads of the steppe: Asia before Chingiz Khān - Chingiz Khān and the founding of the Mongol Empire - Nature and institutions of the Mongol Empire - Mongols in China - Expansion to the West: the Mongols in Russia and Persia - Mongols and Europe - What became of the Mongols?

David Morgan’s The Mongols provides a compelling introduction to the fierce and formidable people who, seemingly overnight, built the greatest continuous land empire in human . The Mongols Band 12 von The Peoples of Europe.

David Morgan’s The Mongols provides a compelling introduction to the fierce and formidable people who, seemingly overnight, built the greatest continuous land empire in human history. Vollständige Rezension lesen. Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen. The Mongols David Morgan Keine Leseprobe verfügbar - 1991.

Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. Volume 71 Issue 2. David Morgan

Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. David Morgan: English Français. Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. David Morgan: The Mongols. (The Peoples of Europe. xxii, 246 pp. Oxford and Malden: Blackwell, 2007.

Eastern Images of Europe. 8. What Became of the Mongols?. 9. The Mongol Empire since 1985. Supplementary Bibliography. Chronology of Events.

Items related to The Mongols (The Peoples of Europe). David Morgan is Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was previously Reader in the History of the Middle East at SOAS, London. David Morgan The Mongols (The Peoples of Europe). ISBN 13: 9780631135562. The Mongols (The Peoples of Europe).

The Mongol Empire was the largest continuous land empire known to history, its violent creation the major political event of the 13th century world. Yet little is known of the history of Christendom's most formidable and dangerous eastern neighbour. This chronicle benefits from new discoveries and a broad range of source material. David Morgan explains how the vast Mongolian Empire was organized and governed, examining the religious and political character of the steppe nomadic society. He assesses the astonishing military career of Chingiz (Genghis) Khan, considers the nature of Mongol imperial government, and the effects of Mongol campaigns on the countries and peoples they conquered in China, Russia, Persia and Europe. Dr Morgan extends his narrative through the collapse of the empire and the formation of a People's Republic as a Russian satellite.

Gosar
This book is considered one of the definitive works on the Mongol Empire. And for good reason. David Morgan is a scholar that specializes in Iranian and Central Asian studies. His knowledge is second to none and he writes in a clear yet entertaining prose. This book covers the sources and methodology for studying Mongol history in the introduction and first chapter. This chapter is valuable for students and scholars. The other chapters cover the history of Asia before the rise of Chingiz khan, Chingiz Khan and his life and times, the organinization of the Mongol Empire, the Mongol Yuan dynasty, and the Golden Horde, and the Ilkanhate, the Mongol legacy, and the relationship between the Mongols and the West. Other indispensible features the book has is a dynastic table of Mongol rulers, maps, illustrations, a concise chronology, notes, and a bibliography for further study. This gem of a book was the first but still one of the best scholarly introductions to the Mongols and their empire. One of the few books on the Mongols I can recommend to students, scholars, and general readers on the basis of it being comprehensive, scholarly, and readable.

Here's a tip for broke college students or general readers. Buy the hardcover. It's much cheaper. It's older but the content is the same except the bibliography but it doesn't really matter because you'll save a lot of money and you don't really need a revised bibliography anyway.
Der Bat
Of several books on the Mongols I have read (Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World,The Mongols and the West: 1221-1410), Morgan's history is my first choice. From the outset, he begins with a discussion of the challenges scholars of these nomad-conquorers face in terms of access to primary documents: given the breadth of their empire, sources are written in Persian, Chinese, Mongolian, Japanese, Arabic and Latin and the impact and influence they had varies tremendoulsy by region and by time period. In spite of these herculean obstacles, Morgan does an admirable job of giving background, providing context and explaining the influence the Mongols had on the civilizations they encountered. As a part of the "People's of Europe" series, one would expect the book to have a strong European focus - I found this not to be the case, as relative equal attention is given the Il Khans and Yuan dynasty.

Morgan begins with a primer on steppe society and Mongolian political organization, both of which naturally had a strong influence on the way in which the Mongols governed and their attitude towards the people they conquored. From this, he is able to demonstrate why, for example, the Mogols were so religiously tolerant (particularly notable for a time when religious tolerance was rare) and how the Mongol army was able to extend its power - and maintain it - over such a huge expanse. His explanation of Mongol society also provided insight behind the crises of succession as power moved from one Khan to another, not always in a clear dynastic line. The concluding chapters on the decline of the Mongols and "where are they now?" was the weakest part of the book.

Previous reviewers have noted the writing is a bit pedantic; this is true, but Morgan isn't writing for a popular audience. I found him to be detailed, well organized and insightful. His chapter on the Yuan dynasty in China in particular was fascinating. Strongly recommended for those interested in an introduction to the Mongols.
Rishason
Got this for my brother and he really likes it. I found it on Amazon for a lower price than the online bookstore I was looking at beforehand.
Vozilkree
Very good book, well-written, on a somewhat esoteric topic for most of us. You'll get the history of Genghis Khan and what followed thereafter. Not too long, easy read, but you may want to map handy so the geography makes sense.
Vozuru
Author's got a great sense of humor! Easy to read and very enjoyable as a textbook.
Fomand
This is a well written general history of the Mongols. It explains the rise of the Mongol Empire and its disintegration into several successor empires. It is organized more on topics than strictly chronological. It is NOT a detailed military history nor a detailed biography of the various Mongol leaders. I think it does an especially good job of putting the Mongols in the context of the larger historical "picture." The first chapter is a pretty dry academic discussion of source data for historians which can probably be safely skipped. The rest of the book flows pretty well. I very much enjoyed the book and it scratched the itch of "who were the Mongols?"
Arashitilar
An extremely informative and interesting summary characterization and history of the Mongols and their multifarious invasions, relationships, and contacts with the wider world. As informativeness is inversely related to what's often called "riveting" prose, those seeking a "fun read" may well experience "dryness" or "boredom" -- that's the way it goes with learning, or not. I value this book greatly.
A few years ago, I read three books on the Mongol history, and found them interesting, but somewhat incomplete. I ordered Morgan's book to augment those earlier reads, but so far I have had only time to browse through this current book. I like what I see in a quick browse, but a more definitive opinion will have to wait its turn until I have the time to do it justice!

In other words, a quick perusal looks like it will be worth my time to read it carefully … but a more definitive opinion will have to wait until I can do it justice...