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by Boethius
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Ancient Civilizations
  • Author:
    Boethius
  • ISBN:
    0486421635
  • ISBN13:
    978-0486421636
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Dover Publications (April 10, 2002)
  • Pages:
    144 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Ancient Civilizations
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1784 kb
  • ePUB format
    1968 kb
  • DJVU format
    1383 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    202
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The Consolation of Philosophy (Latin: De consolatione philosophiae) is a philosophical work by the Roman statesman Boethius, written around the year 524. It has been described as the single most important and influential work in the West on Medieval.

The Consolation of Philosophy (Latin: De consolatione philosophiae) is a philosophical work by the Roman statesman Boethius, written around the year 524. It has been described as the single most important and influential work in the West on Medieval and early Renaissance Christianity, as well as the last great Western work of the Classical Period

Steve Donoghue, openlettersmonthly.

Steve Donoghue, openlettersmonthly. This is a beautifully made little book that I have taken with me on a number of trips, partly just for the pleasure of holding it. At any time I would be glad to have it. ―John Wilson, Books and Culture.

As The Consolation of Philosophy opens, Boethius describes his listless sadness and terror at his state: ‘White hairs are scattered untimely on my head, and the skin hangs loosely from my worn-out limbs’.

As The Consolation of Philosophy opens, Boethius describes his listless sadness and terror at his state: ‘White hairs are scattered untimely on my head, and the skin hangs loosely from my worn-out limbs’

Boethius' Consolation of Philosophy is one of the essential works of Western philosophy and literature. It is still relevant although it was written 1500 years ago. Having enjoyed a life of privilege, honour and comfort, Boethius found himself imprisoned for treason.

Boethius' Consolation of Philosophy is one of the essential works of Western philosophy and literature. The accusations against him were baseless but Boethius knew he was going to be executed anyway. While imprisoned alone in his dungeon cell, Boethius engaged in imaginary conversations and debates with Fortune and Philosophy on such topics as Fate, Philosophy and the fickleness of Fortune

The book is heavily influenced by Plato and his dialogues (as was Boethius himself).

Boethius was at the very heights of power in Rome and was brought down by treachery. The book is heavily influenced by Plato and his dialogues (as was Boethius himself).

The book called 'The Consolation of Philosophy' was throughout the Middle Ages, and down to the beginnings of the .

The book called 'The Consolation of Philosophy' was throughout the Middle Ages, and down to the beginnings of the modern epoch in the sixteenth century, the scholar's familiar companion. Few books have exercised a wider influence in their time. Boethius belonged to an ancient family, which boasted a connection with the legendary glories of the Republic, and was still among the foremost in wealth and dignity in the days of Rome's abasement. His parents dying early, he was brought up by Symmachus, whom the age agreed to regard as of almost saintly character, and afterwards became his son-in-law.

Boethius composed the De Consolatione Philosophiae in the sixth century AD whilst awaiting death under . I had to read this book for both PHL100Y1Y, Introduction to Philosophy, and ENG150Y1Y, The Literary Tradition. I still don't understand it.

Boethius composed the De Consolatione Philosophiae in the sixth century AD whilst awaiting death under torture, condemned on a charge of treason which he protested was manifestly unjust. Though a convinced Christian, in detailing the true end of life which is the soul's knowledge of God, he consoled himself not with Christian precepts but with the tenets of Greek philosophy.

The Consolation of Philosophy. By. Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius. He translated three books of Euclid, and wrote other mathematical works. THE CONSOLATION OF PHILOSOPHY of the government and the welfare of the Italians, Boethius was charged with treason

The Consolation of Philosophy. He translated and wrote books THE CONSOLATION OF PHILOSOPHY of the government and the welfare of the Italians, Boethius was charged with treason. Without his being allowed to defend himself, his property was confiscated, and he himself condemned to death. He was imprisoned at Ticinum (Pavia), tortured, and brutally put to death at Calvenzano His father-in-law, Symmachus, was also executed.

Consolation of Philosophy (Latin: Consolatio Philosophiae) is a philosophical work .

Consolation of Philosophy (Latin: Consolatio Philosophiae) is a philosophical work by Boethius written in about the year 524 AD. It has been described as the single most important and influential work in the West in medieval and early Renaissance Christianity, and is also the last great work that can be called Classical. Genre(s): Non-fiction, Philosophy.

One of the most influential books in the history of Western thought, The Consolation of Philosophy was written in a prison cell by a condemned man. Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius (c. 480–524) was a Roman scholar, theologian, philosopher, and statesman. Imprisoned by the Ostrogothic king Theodoric, probably on trumped-up subversion charges, he was thrown into a remote prison where he was eventually executed.While awaiting his fate, he wrote this dialogue in alternating prose and poetry between himself and his spiritual guardian. Its subject is human happiness and the possibility of achieving it in the midst of the suffering and disappointment that characterize human existence. As Richard H. Green notes in the introduction, "For the reader of the Christian Middle Ages, The Consolation of Philosophy celebrated the life of the mind, or reason, and the possibility of its ultimate victory over the misfortunes and frustrations which attend fallen man's pursuit of transitory substitutes for the Supreme Good which alone can satisfy human desires."Mr. Green's translation is quite literal in order to remain as faithful as possible to Boethius's original meaning. He has also provided an informative introduction and notes. The result is a superbly accessible edition that still exercises a powerful influence on contemporary thinkers and theologians and represents a source of comfort and solace for the general reader.


Kezan
Boethius wrote this while in jail waiting for his execution around 524 - 525 AD. I had never read anything by the man, but this text, short as it is, became one of the cornerstones of medieval thought and influenced countless other authors and thinkers.

Boethius wrote it to console himself. In his darkest hour he turned to two things, God and his training in philosophy to give himself hope, to sort through his doubts and concerns. His imaginary conversation with Lady Philosophy shows his education from Athens, his reaching out to God for his final and ultimate source of strength is driven from his belief in the miracle in Jerusalem.

This isn't argument for the existence of God, Boethius assumes outright that God exists, this is a book from a man on the ropes, his life in tatters, with no help coming and his death assured. This is the cry of a man seeking hope from the sources that had supported him his adult life. This is from a man that was staring fate square in the eye and refused to do anything except meet it on his own terms. Boethius ends the Roman era with aplomb while planting the seeds of Medieval Scholasticism.

The book is easy to read, his arguments clear and straight to the point. He treats the existence of God like the existence of philosophy, both are beyond dispute.

But what struck me the most was how timeless his worries and concerns were and how Lady Philosophy's answers are just applicable now; Boethius is relevant today as much as he was when King Alfred the Great set about laying the foundation to recover his civilization.

I have no way of proving this idea, but there was a passage that struck me as being the inspiration for one of the well know quotes from Shakespeare's Hamlet. Read this from Boethius: "This very place which thou callest exile is to them that dwell therein their native land. So true is it that nothing is wretched, but thinking makes it so, and conversely every lot is happy if borne with equanimity."

And here's Hamlet Act II, Scene ii: "Why, then, 'tis none to you; for there is nothing
either good or bad, but thinking makes it so: to me
it is a prison."

Too much of a match to be mere coincidence.

The book's impact cannot be measured. Boethius himself cast a long shadow against the centuries, his translations and commentaries of classic Greek philosophical texts were used by the educated Christian world during the Medieval Scholastic period and beyond.

The Consolation is a fusion of Christian and Classical Greek and Roman thought that quite literally changed the world.
Centrizius
An underappreciated work very much in need at this time. In short, a discussion about what being self cognizant and sufficient allows in comparison to what depending upon fleeting experiences and "things" allows. A comparative evaluation about true happiness versus that which is simply pleasurable. This work was written as Boethius was awaiting his death and as he contemplates the purpose of leading a good life. Incredibly insightful.
Whiteflame
... Then said I: 'Verily, thy pleas are plausible—yea, steeped in the honeyed sweetness of music and rhetoric. But their charm lasts only while they are sounding in the ear; the sense of his misfortunes lies deeper in the heart of the wretched. So, when the sound ceases to vibrate upon the air, the heart's indwelling sorrow is felt with renewed bitterness...."

This is H. R. James translation first published in 1897. As a younger man, I disdained any version which turned Boethius's unrhymed Latin meters into rhymed English- how could such versions be literal? Mellowed out in middle age, and still unable to read the original, I appreciate James's renditions and imagine them as faithful in their way as any before or since:

SONG I. The Thorns of Error.

Who fain would sow the fallow field,
And see the growing corn,
Must first remove the useless weeds,
The bramble and the thorn.

After ill savour, honey's taste
Is to the mouth more sweet;
After the storm, the twinkling stars
The eyes more cheerly greet.

When night hath past, the bright dawn comes
In car of rosy hue;
So drive the false bliss from thy mind,
And thou shall see the true.

It is a very edifying work- very worthwhile reading when one is in a serious mood. It is more of a distillation or recapitulation of ancient philosophy (from Plato to Seneca) than bold new thought- Augustine is better in that respect.

... And yet wealth cannot extinguish insatiable greed, nor has power ever made him master of himself whom vicious lusts kept bound in indissoluble fetters; dignity conferred on the wicked not only fails to make them worthy, but contrarily reveals and displays their unworthiness. Why does it so happen? Because ye take pleasure in calling by false names things whose nature is quite incongruous thereto—by names which are easily proved false by the very effects of the things themselves; even so it is; these riches, that power, this dignity, are none of them rightly so called.

Finally, something which struck me forcibly when I read it a year ago:

... But let us consider a few instances whereby appears what is the competency of human reason to fathom the Divine unsearchableness. Here is one whom thou deemest the perfection of justice and scrupulous integrity; to all-knowing Providence it seems far otherwise. We all know our Lucan's admonition that it was the winning cause that found favour with the gods, the beaten cause with Cato. So, shouldst thou see anything in this world happening differently from thy expectation, doubt not but events are rightly ordered; it is in thy judgment that there is perverse confusion.
Bundis
Boethius was a seminal thinker, whose ideas ate mostly familiar to students of the classics and /or theology. But all Christians should be familiar with this book. It is clear and persuasive, expanding understanding of how God relates to His creation, and how we can reconcile free will and God's foreknowledge of our actions. In C. S. Lewis' "Screwtape Letters" the senior demon refers to Boethius as a "meddler," informing humans too much about God's nature. A good recommendation , I would say. This book is charming and clear, a good read in all senses.