» » The Ancient City: A Study on the Religion, Laws and Institution of Greece and Rome (Classic Reprint)

Download The Ancient City: A Study on the Religion, Laws and Institution of Greece and Rome (Classic Reprint) fb2

by Fustel de Coulanges
Download The Ancient City: A Study on the Religion, Laws and Institution of Greece and Rome (Classic Reprint) fb2
Ancient Civilizations
  • Author:
    Fustel de Coulanges
  • ISBN:
    1451004982
  • ISBN13:
    978-1451004984
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Forgotten Books (June 9, 2010)
  • Pages:
    534 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Ancient Civilizations
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1268 kb
  • ePUB format
    1115 kb
  • DJVU format
    1757 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    260
  • Formats:
    doc mbr rtf azw


The metadata below describe the original scanning.

The metadata below describe the original scanning. Bibliographical footnotes.

Fustel de Coulanges, a 19th Century French specialist in medieval history was so flustered by phrygian caps . The Ancient City" should be essential reading for Law students and Roman Law courses in particular, even if your current professor omits the book in your reading list.

Fustel de Coulanges, a 19th Century French specialist in medieval history was so flustered by phrygian caps and the demagogic appropiation of "Greek Democracy" as a "model" or "precursor" of modern western democracies, that he decided to shut himself up at home for ten years, accompanied only by Sanscrit, Greek and Latin primary sources to canvas the truest possible reconstruction of ancient.

The Ancient City book. With this influential study, French historian Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges initiated a new approach to Greek and Roman city organization. Fustel de Coulanges' 1864 masterpiece, La Cité antique, drew upon physical evidence as well as ancient documents rather than the usual post-Classical histories. The result is a fresh, accurate, and detailed portrait of the religious, With this influential study, French historian Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges initiated a new approach to Greek and Roman city organization.

A Study on the Religion, Laws, and Institutions of Greece and Rome. Numa Denis Fustel De Coulanges  Kitchener. Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges, The Ancient City, 7. happen that institutions so very different from anything of which we have an idea to-day, could become established and reign for so long a time? What is the superior principle which gave them authority over the minds of men? But by the side of these institutions and laws place the religious ideas of those times, and the facts at once become clear, and their explanation is no longer doubtful.

Fustel De Coulanges, 1830-1889 Under federal law, if you knowingly misrepresent that online material.

Fustel De Coulanges, 1830-1889 Under federal law, if you knowingly misrepresent that online material is infringing, you may be subject to criminal prosecution for perjury and civil penalties, including monetary damages, court costs, and attorneys’ fees.

Стр. 52 - The ancient family was a religious rather than a natural association ; and we shall see presently that the wife was counted in the family only after the sacred ceremony of marriage had initiated her into the worship ; that the son was no longer counted in it when he had renounced the worship, or had been emancipated ; that, on the other hand

Numa Denis Fustel De Coulanges, Willard Small. The Ancient City is Fustel de Coulanges' superb investigation of life during classical antiquity; a culture he felt rested and flourished upon religious observance.

Numa Denis Fustel De Coulanges, Willard Small. This fascinating history offers the reader ideas of how day-to-day life in Ancient Rome and Greece was sustained for centuries. Coulanges covers each major topic in sequence, beginning with the crucial assertion that religion what was held classical life together

Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges (French: ; 18 March 1830 – 12 September 1889) was a French historian.

Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges (French: ; 18 March 1830 – 12 September 1889) was a French historian. Joseph McCarthy argues that his first great book, The Ancient City (1864) was based on his in-depth knowledge of the primary Greek and Latin texts

Thus observed, Greece and Rome appear to us in a character absolutely inimitable; nothing in modern times . The history of Greece and Rome is a witness and an example of the intimate relation which always exists between men's ideas and their social state

Thus observed, Greece and Rome appear to us in a character absolutely inimitable; nothing in modern times resembles them; nothing in the future can resemble them. We shall attempt to show by what rules these societies were regulated, and it will be freely admitted that the same rules can never govern humanity again. The history of Greece and Rome is a witness and an example of the intimate relation which always exists between men's ideas and their social state. Examine the institutions of the ancients without thinking of their religious notions, and you find them obscure, whimsical, and inexplicable.

The Ancient City, originally published in the 1870s, provides a 19th-century French view of Greek and Roman metropolises.

THE ANCIENT CITY. INTRODUCTION. The Necessity of studying the earliest Beliefs of the Ancients in order to understand their Institutions. IT is proposed here to show upon wllat principles and by what rules Greek and Roman society was gov~ erned. We unite in the same study both the Greeks and the Romans, because these two peoples, who were two branches of a single race, and who spoke two Idioms of a single language, also had the same insti~ tutions and the same principles of government, and passed through a series of similar revolutions. We shall attempt to set in a clear light the radical and essential differences which at all times distinguished these ancient peoples from modern societies. In our system of education, we live from infancy in the midst of the Greeks and Romans, and become accustomed continually to compare them with ourselves, to judge of their history by our own, and to explain our revolutions by theirs. 'Vbat we have received from them leads us to Table of Contents CONTENTS 5; BOOK THIRD; THE CITY; CIlAI'TER PAGE; 1 The Phratry anel the Cury The Tribe •• 154; II New Religious Beliefs • • • • • • • • • 159; 1 The Goels of Physical Nature • • • • 159; III; IV; J Relation of this Religion to the Development; of Human Society •; The City is formed • • •; The City U1,bs ••; 161; 161; 171; V 'Vorship of the Founder Legend of Eneas • • 188; YI The Goels of the City • • 1!):~; VII The Religion of the City; 1 The Public Meals • •; 2 The Festivals and the Calenelar; 205; 205; 210; 3 The Census • • • • • • • • • 213; 4 Religion in the Assembly, in the Senate, in the; Tribunal, in the Army The Triumph • 216; VIII The Rituals and the Annals • • • • • • 222; IX Government of the City The King • • • • • 231; 1 Religious Authority of the King • • • • • 231; 2 Political Authority of the King; X The Magistracy

Corgustari
_The Ancient City: A Study of the Religion, Laws, and Institutions of Greece and Rome_ is a translation of _La Cite Antique_ of Fustel de Coulanges, first published in 1864, and made available as a translation by The Johns Hopkins University Press. Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges was a French classicist who devoted his attention to the ancient pagan civic religions of the Greeks and Romans, contrasting this with that of the Indians (Aryans). His ideas concerning this ancient pagan religion were part of a milieu of social evolutionary ideas that included H. S. Maine and J. J. Bachofen. He also wrote on the origins of the Gauls and French society and his ideas concerning their Roman origins were put to use by various extreme rightist organizations such as the Action Francaise of Charles Maurras. The writings of Fustel de Coulanges have proven particularly profitable for many later French sociologists and anthropologists, though they were to come to reject certain of his ideas as not being confirmed by historical evidence. Christianity played a special role in the theories of Fustel de Coulanges as the subsequent religion which overtook the pagan Greek and Roman civic religion and supplanted it with a universalist system. In addition, Fustel de Coulanges wrote against the various socialist theorists of the time, emphasizing the role of private property among the earliest Greeks and Romans. This book includes a Foreword by Arnaldo Momigliano and S. C. Humphreys which points to many of the central issues involved in the reading of Fustel de Coulanges and the text of _The Ancient City_ proper.

To begin, the author notes the essential necessity of studying the earliest beliefs of the ancients in an effort to understand their institutions. The author next turns his attentions to the earliest beliefs about the soul and death. In particular, the abode of the dead is discussed, as well as the need of the dead for food (noting that on certain days the ancients were to bring food to the tombs of the departed). The author also notes the practice of the worship of the dead. The deified souls of the departed were known as demons or heroes to the Greeks and as Lares, Manes, or Genii to the Latins. The author also discusses the role of the sacred hearth-fire and the worship of fire. This hearth-fire was always kept burning. Next, the author turns his attention to the ancient domestic religion, emphasizing the patriarchal society that existed and the role of the family in that religion. Each family was ruled over by the father, who may bequeath his rule to his eldest son, and each family preserved its own gods (the ancestors) and the sacred fire. The author discusses such important aspects of the ancient family as marriage (in which a meal was shared between the bride and her husband initiating the bride into the worship of the husband's family), kinship, the right of succession, property (an important institution for the ancient family, though one that was passed down from father to son exclusively), authority in the family, and morals in the family. In particular, the author also discusses the gens at Rome and Greece (noting the aristocratic nature of the Roman clan and showing the contrast between plebeians and patricians). Following this discussion, the author turns his attention to the ancient city proper. Here, the author notes how while the ancient domestic religion prohibited families from mingling, it was still possible for the ancient families to unite in a phratria (to the Greeks) or curia (to the Latins). The author also shows how new religious beliefs formed, based on the worship of natural phenomena, invoking such ancient names for the sun as Hercules (the glorious), Phoebus (the shining), Apollo (he who drives away night or evil), Hyperion (the elevated Being), and Alexicacos (the beneficent). The author shows that while the ancient family domestic religion involved the worship of ancestors, these gods came to be present for all. The author discusses the city and its various customs, including the religion of the city and its gods. Here, he notes such things as public repasts, festivals and the calendar, the census, and religion in the assembly, in the Senate, in the Tribunal, in the Army, and in the Triumph. The author also discusses various rituals, the king, the magistracy, the law, and the citizen and stranger. In addition, the author also discusses ancient patriotism and the means to exile. Finally, the author discusses war, peace, and the alliance of the gods. This brings the author to a discussion of the omnipotence of the state and the lack of individual liberty among the ancients. The next section of this book concerns the various revolutions that occurred as plebeians demanded more rights from the ancient order, leading eventually to the creation of democracy. In the first revolution, political authority was taken from the king (although the king was still to retain religious authority). The author discusses this revolution was it played out at Sparta, Athens, and Rome. At this time, the aristocracy governed the city. In the second revolution, various changes occurred in the constitution of the family and the right of primogeniture disappeared. It was at this point that the clients became free (the author mentions in particular the work of Solon). In the third revolution, the plebs entered the city. The author discusses this revolution as it played out at Athens and Rome. The author also discusses changes in the private law, the Code of the Twelve Tables, and the Code of Solon. In the fourth revolution, an aristocracy of wealth tried to establish itself and this lead to the establishment of democracy and popular suffrage. However, it is in the conflict between rich and poor that democracy failed and popular tyrants arose. The final section of this book is devoted to the disappearance of the municipal regime. Here, the author notes how new beliefs arose as the traditional religious structures were changed to become more universal. The author discusses the Roman conquest and the subsequent rise of Christianity. By calling to itself the whole human race, Christianity made the most radical change to the pagan religion.

This book provides an excellent account of the earliest ancient Greek and Roman pagan religion that revolved around the family and its subsequent demise with the rise of the Romans and the beginnings of Christianity. It is the universal message of Christianity that lives on from most ancient times. This book is a fascinating sociological account of the ancient city and its religion and customs, showing in detail the ancient pagan belief system. Fustel de Coulanges is very learned and argues extensively from many ancient sources, both Greek and Roman (but also mentioning ancient Indian and Hebrew sources as well).
uspeh
Brilliant and unchallenged interpretation of community and City State life in Indoeuropean ancient societies. Fustel de Coulanges, a 19th Century French specialist in medieval history was so flustered by phrygian caps and the demagogic appropiation of "Greek Democracy" as a "model" or "precursor" of modern western democracies, that he decided to shut himself up at home for ten years, accompanied only by Sanscrit, Greek and Latin primary sources to canvas the truest possible reconstruction of ancient political life. Uninfluenced by university politics, he distilled this wondrous book, "La Cité Antique", where we find how these societies voted, made law, married, gave cult to their beliefs, etc. Obviously and by far the ancients didn't do these things as we do them now. "The Ancient City" should be essential reading for Law students and Roman Law courses in particular, even if your current professor omits the book in your reading list. Don't read it if you want to believe that the greeks and romans held primaries in New Hampshire.
Saberblade
This text provides a detailed account of life in Ancient Greece that goes beyond the mere superficial and exposes the intellectual undercurrents to Greek society. I always find myself referring back to it.
Dorintrius
The Kindle edition had no paragraph or chapter breaks. The prose was one continuous series of sentences. It was not what I was expecting from a Kindle edition
Rolorel
I love the book even though it arrived when i had forgotten about it. All the same I have no regrets that i have it.
Runehammer
I read references to the work of Fustel de Coulanges in the writings of the great and heroic French historian, Marc Bloch, (The Historian's Craft) and was intrigued enough to get and read it. What an eye-opener! It is undoubtedly among the top 10 seminal historical works ever written, in my opinion. Considering the data that Fustel did not have access to, for which some criticize him, makes this achievement even that much more impressive. His thought revealed in his writing is clear, insightful, brilliant.

What you will find in this book is a masterful story of the descent of the many institutions to which we are still heir though the context and specific manifestations have changed. In many cases, we believe things about why this or that custom has always been with us that are wrong, and Fustel sets out the evidence for what is really behind such things as marriage ceremonies, carrying the bride over the threshold, the foundations of the legal system including why it was the eldest son who got everything for thousands of years, and so forth. There are many questions about why things are the way they are answered in this book.

As other reviewers have noted, there are many descriptions in "The Ancient City" that will bring elements of the Bible to mind. The big question nowadays is: did the Bible borrow from other stories and cultures to create a "history of Israel" that never actually happened? Were some of those stories Greek? And were the Greek stories influenced by elements from Anatolia and Mesopotamia, coming to the Bible by a circuitous route? Did the authors of the Septuagint borrow from Homer and Herodotus?

These are all questions that are interesting and can be better formulated by also reading Russel Gmirkin's book: Berossus and Genesis, Manetho and Exodus: Hellenistic Histories and the Date of the Pentateuch (Library Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies)and Bruce Louden's book: Homer's Odyssey and the Near East

Despite some of the nit-picking criticisms that have been directed at Fustel over the years, I've never found a significant argument that Fustel got it wrong. His sweeping overview of "how things must have happened" by taking what we know and back-engineering it, is amazing. Everyone should - and can - read it because Fustel was not a stuffy academic who wanted to wrap bizarre ideas in obscure language: he wanted to set out a rational view of why our culture is the way it is which can seem to be totally irrational until you understand what is behind things. If he had had knowledge of periodic cosmic catastrophes such as those explicated in the works of Victor Clube and Bill Napier, (The Cosmic Serpent as well as Firestone, West and Warwick-Smith, The Cycle of Cosmic Catastrophes: How a Stone-Age Comet Changed the Course of World Culture he would have been able to take the topic to its most basic level: fear of death manipulated by individuals seeking power. For that part of the story, you need to read Becker's Escape from Evil.

In any event, The Ancient City is definitely a big piece of the puzzle. If you read the works of Julius Caesar, (Caesar's Commentaries. The Complete Gallic Wars. Revised.: Revised Edition (Latin Edition) you will want to read Fustel first so as to better understand that most amazing of heroes, the one who could have saved Rome had the wealthy elite not been so greedy and psychopathic, and had he not been so humane and forgiving.

In short, in order to understand a lot of things about ancient history, the history of Rome, and our own civilization which is the daughter of Rome, you need to read Fustel. And you will enjoy it and be glad you did!