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by Thomas S. Burns
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Ancient Civilizations
  • Author:
    Thomas S. Burns
  • ISBN:
    0253206006
  • ISBN13:
    978-0253206008
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Indiana University Press; Reprint edition (February 22, 1991)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Ancient Civilizations
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1701 kb
  • ePUB format
    1334 kb
  • DJVU format
    1727 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    227
  • Formats:
    mobi mbr doc lit


A History of the Ostrogoths book. Thomas Burns faces the problem confronted by many historians writing about dimly perceived, partially-literate tribes.

A History of the Ostrogoths book. Even with the advent of modern archeological studies, there remains much we don't know about the Ostrogoths, and the gaps will probably persist, absent new major finds under the earth or in a forgotten ancient library somewhere.

A History of the Ostrogoths Paperback – February 22, 1991. by. Thomas S. Burns (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. From the Goths early migrations, incursions, and relations with Rome, all the way to transient dominance under Theodoric the Great and his lesser successors, Burns, the accomplished scholar, artfully blends his deep knowledge of the original sources with contemporary archaeological lore.

Running title, A history of the Ostrogoths. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

This work, the first study of the Ostrogoths in almost a century, traces their initial contact with the Roman world in the third century through the dissolution of their kingdom in Italy in 554. It depicts early Ostrogothic society and studies the interactions between these barbarians and the Roman Empire - relations and exchanges which played an important role in the metamorphosis, rise, and fall of Ostrogothic society.

The Association o f American University Presses’ Resolution on Permissions constitutes the only exception to this prohibition. Manufactured in the United States o f America.

A history of the ostrogoths. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1984. 24 cm. Includes index and bibliography. SYNOPSIS: Covers the rise and fall of Ostrogothic society from their initial contacts with the Roman Empire in the third century to the dissolution of their kingdom in Italy in 554 AD. Light wear to top and bottom of spine, minor bruising to left corner of back cover, else a near fine copy in fine dustjacket. do NOT contact me with unsolicited services or offers.

Thomas S. Burns is Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of History at Emory University

Thomas S. Burns is Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of History at Emory University. His many books include The Ostrogoths: Kingship and Society (1980), A History of the Ostrogoths (1984), Barbarians within the Gates of Rome: Roman Military Policy and the Barbarians (1994), and, with John W. Eadie, Urban Centers and Rural Contexts in Late Antiquity (2000). Burns is the Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of History at Emory University. His many books include The Ostrogoths: Kingship and Society; A History of the Ostrogoths; Barbarians within the Gates of Rome: Roman Military Policy and the Barbarians; and, with John W. Eadie, Urban Centers and Rural Contexts in Late Antiquity.

19% off. A History of the Ostrogoths. By (author) Thomas S. Burns.

Walter E. Kaegi Burns has achieved much for the modern study of Ostrogoths. -Antiquaries Journal.

Thorough and convincing... likely to become the standard work on the subject." ―Library Journal

Highly readable." ―Medieval Literature

A major work of synthesis." ―Walter E. Kaegi

Burns has achieved much for the modern study of Ostrogoths." ―Antiquaries Journal


Corgustari
The Ostrogoths are best known for being the briefly in charge of the Italian part of the formerly Roman Empire in the very "Dark Ages" in the 5th and 6th century AD. They were eventually dispatched by the Greek-led Byzantine army in the mid 6th century, and they left little behind except a well known Gothic language Bible that has become a cornerstone of Indo-European comparative linguistics.

The Ostrogoths are often compared to their better known cousins, the Visigoths- the Visigoths were the conquerors of Spain until the Muslims wiped them out after the Ostrogoths lost Italy to the Eastern Roman Empire. If you look at a chart comparing the various branches of the Germanic language family (which includes English, yeah?) the Ostrogoths are in the "Eastern Germanic" branch. By Eastern Germanic linguists are not referring to the 20th century East Germany, rather the Goths had their roots in the Steppes of Russia. The general consensus is that they came west as part of the Hunnic armies, and probably first entered the Roman Empire during the great western raids Attila of the Hun.

After the Hunnic Emprie collapsed, the Ostrogoths perambulated about the Balkans, unable to settle down and farm (which is what they probably wanted to do) until their great leader Theodoric (one of several Gothic Theodorics who were running around at the same time.) Theodoric managed to unite a bunch of related Gothic tribes into the "Ostrogoths" and they stormed into the Italian peninsula, eventually establishing their capital in Ravena. The Ostrogoths settled inside of Italy, and Theodoric spent the next thirty ish years (490 AD-526 AD) trying to establish the kind of Indo-European Kingdom that is familiar to readers of the Rig Veda: a military elite ruling over a pre-existing domestic population. Theodoric was mostly a failure in this regard, but the fact that the conquered peoples were in the heartland of the Roman Empire means that we know a fair deal about Theodoric, his empire and Gothic society.

One of the main points that Burns makes is that the Ostrogoths were uncomfortable with what we moderns call "institutions." Loyalty to government was family and personality based: Most often both attributes needed to be embodied in a single individual for Ostrogothic government to actually exist in any substantial form. The Ostrogoths practiced the Germanic/Indo-European custom known as Comitatus, wherein a leader is supported by a small group of warriors (King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table is an English remnant of the larger Germanic concept.) These Warriors were bound to the LEADER, not to the "state" or "nation." Such was their loyalty that the death of the Leader meant the death of the remaining members of the Comitatus.

The Comitatus was remarkably successful both inside and outside Indo-European speaking traditions. For example, the Mamalukes of the Ottoman Empire (a Turkish speaking state) were as pure an example of Comitatus as any Indo European version. Another example is the so-called "Slave Empire" of the Mughals.(another Turkish speaking group) The Mughal Empire was called the "slave empire" because the Mughals had been in the Comitatus of the Persian speaking armies of Islam during their conquest of Central Asia.

The Establishment of Ostrogothic rule in Italy is one of the better documented transitions from "barbarian" Indo European traditions to the "civilized" Mediterranean/Greek/Roman model of government. Unfortunately, this book does little to explore that interesting development, being content to lay out the history, customs & culture of Ostrogoths in more or less conventional fashion. Honestly though, I couldn't find anything better. Not written in English, anyway.
Yozshugore
It would have helped if there had been more timelines of the major events of the history of the Ostrogoths..
olgasmile
Utilizing sparse sources, the author has nevertheless woven an understandable and useful history of these Germanic invaders of the Roman Empire. Due to the sparcity of sources otherwise, much of the book necessarily centers upon the person and activity of Theodoric the Great. Very revealing is that the Ostrogoths were primarily agriculturalists rather than nomads. Particularly useful to any student of the European "Dark Ages" is the detailed discussion of how the Ostrogoths in general and Theodoric in particular were a tolerant people - especially for that era - and consciously preserved much of what remained of the West Roman governmental system and culture and thus preserving it for a half-century longer and transmitting it to later generations. The story is intriguing and masterfully told with great clarity.
Riavay
This book covers the Ostrogoths from vague Tacitus-and-archaeology prehistory through the destruction of the kingdom in Italy. The writing is unengaging and confused; although the chapters are in chronological order, within each chapter decidedly not; sometimes poor editing is clearly to blame, like when the same sentence is the topic sentence of two consecutive paragraphs. There's many times when Burns will discuss the implications of an historical incident without telling us what the actual event was; he does nothing to make it easier to follow the rivalry between Theodoric Strabo and Theodoric son of Theudimer.

Some coverage of material culture, but it's mostly tangential. Indecisive on the question of 'hospitalitas': Burns seems to think it really meant taking possession of a literal third of each estate followed presumably by some kind of re-arrangement and re-shuffling, since he acknowledges that the Goths in Italy tended to live in distinct districts and that the agricultural system needed a full balance of arable, pasture, and woodland in each estate. The one chapter that did very much interest me was on the period of Hunnic overlordship, from the death of Ermanaric to the death of Attila: so much of this clicked with the stories and sagas from early Germanic history with which I'm more familiar that it was most engaging.

Not enough forest, too many trees and not enough trails. I would recommend Peter Heather's books on the Goths by preference. Good notes and bibliography, though.
Xinetan
Thomas Burns' work on the Ostrogothic peoples is interesting, comprehensive, and full of abundant research material for individuals particularly inclined to the study of Germanic tribes and the Later Roman Empire. From the Goths early migrations, incursions, and relations with Rome, all the way to transient dominance under Theodoric the Great and his lesser successors, Burns, the accomplished scholar, artfully blends his deep knowledge of the original sources with contemporary archaeological lore. In doing so, he pieces together fragments of a civilization often clouded by obscurity and presents a work that grasps with clarity all aspects of Ostrogothic society: religion, warfare, art, administration, and the Goths social adaptations within the confines of the Imperial borders to name a few. This work is likely to be the best study of its kind; Thomas Burns has much to offer.