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by David M. Oshinsky
Download Worse than Slavery: Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    David M. Oshinsky
  • ISBN:
    0684830957
  • ISBN13:
    978-0684830957
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Free Press; First Printing (by the Numbers) edition (April 22, 1997)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1104 kb
  • ePUB format
    1234 kb
  • DJVU format
    1477 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    670
  • Formats:
    lrf rtf lit txt


David Oshinsky has utilized the stories of convicts who were sentenced to serve time at Parchman Farm in an effort to define the ordeal of Jim Crow Justice in Reconstruction-era Mississippi

David Oshinsky has utilized the stories of convicts who were sentenced to serve time at Parchman Farm in an effort to define the ordeal of Jim Crow Justice in Reconstruction-era Mississippi. Oshinsky does not focus on the daily operations of the prison, but instead focuses on the intimate daily lives of the prisoners, including those that were promoted to "trusties", and served as guards over the other prisoners (armed guards, no less).

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Worse Than Slavery book. This epic history fills the gap between slavery and the civil rights era, showing how Parchman and Jim Crow justice proved that Prisons in the deep South, with chain gangs, shotguns, and bloodhounds, have been immortalized in movies, blues music, and fiction. Mississippi's Parchman State Penitentiary was the grandfather of them all, a hellhole where conditions were brutal.

But Parchman Farm, as bad as it was, was a reflection of larger problems

But Parchman Farm, as bad as it was, was a reflection of larger problems. For one thing, as Olshinsky notes, Mississippi had a long tradition of violence, and a criminal justice system that tolerated it. Prohibition and the great migration of blacks to the north following World War I increased the percentage of white male Parchman inmates. Segregation was simply extended to the criminal justice system as well. Even reform had its grizzly aspects.

The title says it all: "Worse than Slavery": Parchman Farm and the ordeal of Jim Crow justice. The author supports this bold statement well by documenting the rise and fall of the Southern penal farm, with its brutality, corruption and racism

The title says it all: "Worse than Slavery": Parchman Farm and the ordeal of Jim Crow justice. The author supports this bold statement well by documenting the rise and fall of the Southern penal farm, with its brutality, corruption and racism.

Worse Than Slavery" is an epic history of race and punishment in the deepest South .

Worse Than Slavery" is an epic history of race and punishment in the deepest South from emancipation to the civil rights era - and beyond. Noted historian David M. Oshinsky draws on prison records, pardon files, folklore, oral history, and the blues to offer an unforgettable portrait of Parchman and Jim Crow justice - from the horrors of convict leasing in the late nineteenth century to the struggle for black equality in the 1960s, when Parchman was used to break the spirit of civil rights workers who journeyed. south on the Freedom Rides.

Many of these farms were now tended by women and elderly men, the war having wiped out more than one quarter of the white males in Mississippi over the age of fifteen

Worse Than Slavery" Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice By David M. Oshinsky. Chapter One: Emancipation. I think God intended the niggers to be slaves. Many of these farms were now tended by women and elderly men, the war having wiped out more than one quarter of the white males in Mississippi over the age of fifteen.

Reflection Paper 2: Worse Than Slavery I thought that after a while that history couldn’t shock me anymore. It’s bursting of many disturbing stories, hypocritical beliefs and actions and simple bloodthirsty ignorance. I was wrong, history is full of ironic situations, beliefs and actions that shocked me. The Book: Worse than slavery, is a book that contents don’t skirt around issues and is chock full irony that can be amusing and some that is just plain sickening. Words: 961 - Pages: 4.

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Historian Oshinsky (A Conspiracy So Immense, 1983) draws on materials .

Historian Oshinsky (A Conspiracy So Immense, 1983) draws on materials ranging from court records and blues lyrics of black women prisoners to the novels of William Faulkner for this thoroughgoing history of Parchman Farm, Miss. a 20,000-acre plantation notorious even among the most hardened criminals for its inhumane conditions.

In this sensitively told tale of suffering, brutality, and inhumanity, Worse Than Slavery is an epic history of race and punishment in the deepest South from emancipation to the civil rights era—and beyond.Immortalized in blues songs and movies like Cool Hand Luke and The Defiant Ones, Mississippi’s infamous Parchman State Penitentiary was, in the pre-civil rights south, synonymous with cruelty. Now, noted historian David Oshinsky gives us the true story of the notorious prison, drawing on police records, prison documents, folklore, blues songs, and oral history, from the days of cotton-field chain gangs to the 1960s, when Parchman was used to break the wills of civil rights workers who journeyed south on Freedom Rides.

Urllet
Being from Mississippi and being raised in the Delta, I knew a lot of this History but a lot of it I did not know. Parchman is like the elephant in the room in the South. We know it's there and we've all heard about it but not very of us know the History of it in depth. The author did an excellent job of compiling the information for this book. He not only gave the history of Parchman, but the history of slavery in MS and the aftereffects....the treatment of POC and how in Mississippi they were actually worse off after slavery, and so so much more. I think this book is a MUST READ for all people of color, but especially those of us in the South. Sadly, tho some things have changed here some of this is still the same. Powerful read....sad mostly but so very necessary.
Auridora
Excellent book if you really want to know about Jim Crowe justice. History class in my all white school in the rural north did not give a clue, but this and many other books can enlighten anyone who wants the truth.
Kit
David Oshinsky has utilized the stories of convicts who were sentenced to serve time at Parchman Farm in an effort to define the ordeal of Jim Crow Justice in Reconstruction-era Mississippi.

Oshinsky does not focus on the daily operations of the prison, but instead focuses on the intimate daily lives of the prisoners, including those that were promoted to "trusties", and served as guards over the other prisoners (armed guards, no less).

There is no doubt that "justice" in this era was anything but just - as revealed in the book, a large portion of the prisoners at this particular facility were black males, and were often subjected to prison time for minimal offenses against property or the state - offenses that would not land any white person in prison, much less a labor camp such as Parchman Farm.

I think that David Oshinsky has demonstrated a great command of the subject material in this work & has shown how the racism of the era permeated down into the justice system and how the black men sentenced to serve time at Parchman were indeed subjected to a fate "Worse Than Slavery".
Shakanos
In his book, Worse Than Slavery, Oshinsky documents the rise and fall of the Southern penal farm. By exposing Parchman Farm, the current state penitentiary in the Mississippi Delta that was once a huge cotton plantation, he vividly captures a seldom mentioned shameful history of South.
The author claims that slaves and freedmen were considered part of an inferior race. In an effort to eliminate them, whites invented, Pig Law, followed by Jim Crow laws mandating racial segregation and allowing law enforcement officers to arrest blacks for such crimes as disrespecting white women, stealing food to feed their families, and countless other petty offenses based on their race. These poor souls couldn't afford to pay for attorneys to receive fair trials. They were sent to infamous Parchman Farm or sent as "leased convicts" to Southern Planters. No blacks survived past 10 years, and Parchman Farm soon earned the nickname, "Little Alcatraz". A must-read!
Worse than Slavery: Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice
Ka
I consider this book a must-read for anyone needing an education in our having any developed interest in the racial south. But it's more than that. Everyone should read it.
MrDog
Learned a lot about segregation, how long it lasted (which I didn’t know)and very informative. A great page turner and could not put it down.
Samut
Very sad, but wonderfully historical
Hard to love such a disturbing history, but it was very educational. Thanks Ryan Haygood for the recommendation.