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by Bill Clinton,Brian Winter,Fernando Henrique Cardoso
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Americas
  • Author:
    Bill Clinton,Brian Winter,Fernando Henrique Cardoso
  • ISBN:
    1586483242
  • ISBN13:
    978-1586483241
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    PublicAffairs; First Edition edition (March 13, 2006)
  • Pages:
    291 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1783 kb
  • ePUB format
    1830 kb
  • DJVU format
    1516 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    118
  • Formats:
    lrf lrf azw doc


Fernando Henrique Cardoso was President of the Federative Republic of Brazil for two consecutive terms, from January 1995 to December 2002.

Fernando Henrique Cardoso was President of the Federative Republic of Brazil for two consecutive terms, from January 1995 to December 2002. Born in Rio de Janeiro in 1931, he is married, with three children, and lives in São Paulo. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Fernando Henrique Cardoso received a phone call in the middle of the night asking him to be the new Finance . Fantastic book (co)written by Brian Winter. This was exactly the book I was looking for.

Fernando Henrique Cardoso received a phone call in the middle of the night asking him to be the new Finance Minister of Brazil. As he put the phone down and stared into the darkness of his hotel room, he feared he'd been handed a political death sentence. The year was 1993, and he would be responsible for an economy that had had seven different currencies in the previous Fernando Henrique Cardoso received a phone call in the middle of the night asking him to be the new Finance Minister of Brazil. Библиографические данные. The Accidental President of Brazil: A Memoir Biography. Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Brian Winter.

Fernando Henrique Cardoso was Brazil's penultimate President. This entertaining and insightful memoir brings together the best of Cardoso's insights as sociologist, politician, president and elder statesman. Brazil is the 2nd largest country in the Western Hemisphere, one of the world's 10 largest economies, a major exporter, and yet, as Cardoso rightly points out, many Americans, Europeans, and other foreigners associate Brazil with little more than, "soccer, carneval, and the girl from Ipanema. It is must reading for everyone interested in Brazil's past or concerned about its future.

The Accidental President of Brazil: A Memoir.

MORE BY Richard Feinberg. The Accidental President of Brazil: A Memoir. By Fernando Henrique Cardoso with Brian Winter. Books related to The Accidental President of Brazil.

by Fernando Henrique Cardoso. Fernando Henrique Cardoso received a phone call in the middle of the night asking him to be the new Finance Minister of Brazil. The year was 1993, and he would be responsible for an economy that had had seven different currencies in the previous eight years to cope with inflation that had run at 3000 percent a year. Born in Rio de Janeiro in 1931, he is married, with three children, and lives in Sao Paulo. Country of Publication. Biographies & Autobiographies.

Week 17 Book: The Accidental President of Brazil By: Fernando Henrique Cardoso with Brian Winter. This is the fifth annual book challenge focusing on the symbolisms and meanings with respect to the number five. About This Playlist: This is the fifth annual book challenge focusing on the symbolisms and meanings with respect to the number five. Five provides a sense of personal freedom and personal expression. Five has the most dynamic energy of all of the single digit numbers. Five is unpredictable and always in motion. Five is extremely independent in mind and soul. Five is an adventurer and risk taker. As he put the phone down and stared into the darkness of his hotel room, he feared he'd been handed a political death sentence

Fernando Henrique Cardoso received a phone call in the middle of the night asking him to be the new Finance Minister of Brazil.

Fernando Henrique Cardoso GCB GCTE GCoIISE GColIH GColL GCM . CYC OMRI (Portuguese: ; born June 18, 1931), also known by his initials FHC (), is a Brazilian sociologist, professor and politician who served as the 34th President of Brazil from January 1, 1995 to December 31, 2002. He was the first Brazilian president to be reelected for a subsequent term.

Fernando Henrique Cardoso received a phone call in the middle of the night asking him to be the new Finance Minister of Brazil. As he put the phone down and stared into the darkness of his hotel room, he feared he'd been handed a political death sentence. The year was 1993, and he would be responsible for an economy that had had seven different currencies in the previous eight years to cope with inflation that had run at 3000 percent a year. Brazil had a habit of chewing up finance ministers with the ferocity of an Amazon piranha.

This was just one of the turns in a largely unscripted and sometimes unwanted political career. In exile during the harshest period of the junta that ruled Brazil for twenty years, Cardoso started his political life with a tentative run for the Federal Senate in 1978. Within fifteen years, and despite himself, this former sociologist was running the country.

And what a country! Brazil, it is often said, is on the edge of modernity, striding with one foot in mid-air towards the future, the other still rooted deep in a traditional past. It is a land of sophisticated music and brutal gold-digging, of the next global superpower and the last old-time coffee plantations. It is gloriously ungovernable, irrepressibly attractive, and home to the family, friends and extraordinary life of Fernando Henrique Cardoso. This is his story and his love song to his country.


Celak
This memoir of former Brazilian President, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, reeks of legacy-cementing, but is nonetheless an interesting and brief fly-by of Brazilian history and the country's emergence onto the global economic and political stage.

The book, translated with the help of Brian Winter, is quite skinny on details. Only 280 pages, the book deals little with the realities that Cardoso inevitably faced in his stint as the leader of modern democracy: legislative battles, ideological compromises, political in-fighting, administrative setbacks.

In Cardoso's recount of his Presidency, we are not afforded a look into the former President's heart as he waged these political battles. We are made unaware of any ideological compromises he may have had to make. We are only encouraged to believe that "if nothing else, Brazil's stability is an overwhelming sign that the ideas of [Cardoso's] government should endure." This may indeed be true, but it would be nice if the reader were allowed to draw this conclusion on their own based upon a fair presentation of the facts, rather than having Cardoso tell us this much.

If you are looking for a detailed play-by-play of Cardoso's eight years in power, this book will prove disappointing (you will have to look to Cardoso's more extensive memoir written in Portuguese for that). Much more of the book is focused on the "Accidental" rather than the "President" part of the book's title.

Cardoso provides a hearty background and detail of his family history, and how he went from child in a privileged Brazilian family to a Sociology Professor at the University of Sao Paulo to ultimately the President of Brazil. Cardoso ultimately reduces his rise to power to little more than "luck and circumstance".

Cardoso takes great pains to frame himself as a wonkish Sociology professor, in love with policy and indifferent to power, who happens to rise through the political ranks (after a period of exile) in a happenstance way.

Although, what also becomes clear in Cardoso's memoir is his gentile nature, administrative acumen, and his genuine desire to make Brazil a better and more prosperous country. The The Accidental President of Brazil: A Memoir gives the impression that Cardoso's desire to cement the legacy of his presidency is less for personal reasons, and more to legitimize Brazil as a stable and worthy country- one whose presidents write memoirs and build Presidential Libraries, and one that will ultimately gain admittance into the G7.

Cardoso also provides some interesting insights into his impressions of United States political leaders, as well as of others around the world. Of Clinton (who wrote the preface of this book), Cardoso writes, "His eye for detail, his passion for policy, and his extraordinary personal skills, made Clinton, without a doubt, the most impressive all-around politician I have ever seen."

Of Bush, Cardoso recounts how Bush asked Cardoso, "Do you have blacks in Brazil?" (Brazil has one of the world's largest population of blacks). Cardoso also portrays Bush as a leader who, during his administration, was obsessed- rightly or wrongly- with only his own nation's response to the attacks of September 11th, and who reduced the diplomatic demands of Latin America to only a question of energy. "All he wanted to discuss was energy in Venezuela, and especially who was friends with the Venezuelan government and who was not."

This stark contrast between Cardoso's impressions of Clinton and Bush present an important truth about United States-Latin American diplomatic relations: Latin America, and particularly Brazil, is interested, as is any nation, of achieving an equal footing in international and diplomatic talks with the United States and other world powers.

Any leader of the United States who makes Brazil feel as if they are merely a pawn, or place of untapped economic resources to be utilized, is likely to estrange a country- that if it can maintain stable leadership (like that of Cardoso's administration)- will only rise to evermore prominence on the world stage.
Whitegrove
The reason why I bought this book was because I wanted to know a little more about Fernando Henrique Cardoso's personal life. I thought I might feel a little bored because I thought this book would just talk about politics, but I was completely wrong! Fernando Henrique Cardoso really surprised me - I couldn't stop reading because I wanted to know what was coming on the next page!

In his memoir, Fernando Henrique Cardoso describes a brief History of Brazil and his incredible life story. During the military goverment, Cardoso was a sociology professor. Within twenty-one years of military dictatorship, he was forced to go in exile, moving to Chile and France, continuing his career as a professor. At the end of the military goverment, Cardoso returned to Brazil and started his career in politics. He was elected Senator of the State of São Paulo. He also worked as foreing minister under President Itamar Franco. Surprisingly, Cardoso was named as financial minister, considered a nightmare job because Brazil had a hyperinflation that made prices of basic goods double in the same day. He was responsible for the Real Plan, the currency that saved Brazil from inflation. Cardoso decided to be a presidential candidate in 1994 and was elected for two terms.

While reading this book, I cried with his beautiful life history and I laughed with his good sense of humor. It inspired me and made me believe in a better future even if you're living in a tough time. Fernando Henrique Cardoso has done a lot to Brazil and I think all Brazilians and people who likes Brazil should know about him. Although I was incapable to vote when he was candidate for president of Brazil because I was under 16, I he is definitely the best president of my generation in my opinion.
Mash
Many people consider FHC the best president Brazil ever had. I agree.
He is a respected intellectual, author of numerous publications, and this book shows that he is also and entertaining writer.
With the power of his intellect, he predicted in this 2006 book that: "The foundation for a richer, more prosperous country - and perhaps, one day, a world power - seems to be firmly in place ". With our naked eyes at the present, we have reason to be less optimistic. Should his prophecy be fulfilled, it will not be without big bounces back and forth.
Mohn
This is truely a great book. I have been living in Brazil for a few years, and tried to find a book that could explain its modern history and psyche to me in layman terms. I had not found anything very interesting, until I bought this book and Janice Pearlman's "Favela: Four Decades of Living on the Edge in Rio de Janeiro" (although the latter has a much narrower scope than the former). Fernando Henrique Cardoso's memoir did exactly what I wanted it to do to me: It explained key events of Brazilian history; social, military, political and economical struggles laid out through a very readable story where we follow the sociologist Cardoso's family through various generations. It is built on a chronological model, but has a good use of small dramaturgical tricks, such as pointing into the future and back into the past to drive the story forward. It also brings in some basics on the events of the early day Brazil, then continues up through the decades until Cardoso as a finance minister launches the last of the modern day Brazilian currencies, the Real. This is when he decides to run for president, in order to protect his plan to fix the incessantly failing Brazilian economy. The book is well written, human and humorous, as it gives you a much better idea why Brazil today is like it is. Highly recommended.
Golkis
This book presents a great history lesson about Brazil after the dictatorship of 1964 to 1985. Should be required reading for all interested in Brazilian history.