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by Ed Cray
Download General of the Army: George C. Marshall, Soldier and Statesman fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Ed Cray
  • ISBN:
    0393027759
  • ISBN13:
    978-0393027754
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    W W Norton & Co Inc; 1st edition (April 1, 1990)
  • Pages:
    847 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1587 kb
  • ePUB format
    1917 kb
  • DJVU format
    1212 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    839
  • Formats:
    docx azw mbr mobi


General of the Army book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking General of the Army: George C. Marshall, Soldier and Statesman as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

General of the Army book. Army's Chief of staff through World War II, George. Marshall, Soldier and Statesman as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Ed Cray in this masterful biography brings us face-to-face with a genuine American hero and the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. From the Publisher: 13 . -hour cassettes.

As chief of staff in the . Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Army through World War II, George Marshall the soldier shaped the vast mobilization, the enormous military effort, and the decision to use the atomic bomb. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Jump Start Ketosis: Intermittent Fasting for Burning Fat and Losing Weight.

General of the Army: George C. Marshall, Soldier and Statesman (New York: Cooper Square Press, 1990). 2 Katherine Marshall. Together (New York: Tupper & Love, 1946). Marshall: Hero for Our Times (New York: Hearst Books, 1982). 5 Cray, General of the Army. As with my previous book The Aviators, this is not a full-blown biography of the three army generals; such a book that examines every orifice would likely be several thousand pages long. But nor are the three intertwined stories merely sketches.

Marshall raised an army of nearly seven million as FDR's wartime chief of staff, shaped the postwar . This is a very thorough and positive biography of George Marshall, who is one of the great soldiers and statesmen in the history of the United States.

Marshall raised an army of nearly seven million as FDR's wartime chief of staff, shaped the postwar world as secretary of state and secretary of defense under Truman, and served selflessly with eight other presidents. This book focuses heavily on World War Ii, as it should, although Marshall's post-WWII contributions were also substantial.

Related Items The epic story of the monumental soldier and statesman who, perhaps . George Catlett Marshall, J. s Selfless and Tireless Service of Patriotism without Politics

Title: George Marshall: Soldier and Statesman (16 Jun 1997). The epic story of the monumental soldier and statesman who, perhaps more than anybody else shaped the world we live in today. s Selfless and Tireless Service of Patriotism without Politics. This episode may well serve students of Social Studies, Military and Political Sciences as an interesting Documentary spanning four wars plus the Cold War.

George Marshall is arguably the greatest man of what has come to be known as the Greatest Generation. Only George Washington commanded a similar level of veneration and awe from his contemporaries as Marshall. And, like Washington, Marshall was revered mostly for his irreproachable integrity and honor. In this solid, single volume life of the celebrated Army Chief of Staff, Secretary of State and Secretary of Defense, Ed Cray captures the essence of a man who was at once Olympian, yet, in a sense, quite common and whose special qualities should have been, in an ideal society, unexceptional.

Ed Cray takes readers much further into Marshall’s life than these simple facts. George C. Marshall may not be as well known as other World War II American generals, namely Eisenhower, Patton, and MacArthur. Cray shows us a highly complex man who was outwardly very reserved – Cray likens him to George Washington – and of such high rectitude that when President Roosevelt called him George during a meeting, Marshall corrected him: it is General Marshall, Mr. President. Few people knew of Marshall’s hot temper, which he found difficult to control in his youth and early military career, but which he eventually mastered.

George Marshall - For other people named George Marshall, see George Marshall (disambiguation). There are thousands of books and articles written about this topic. Only the most useful are presented. Marshall, George Catlett - ▪ United States general Introduction born December 31, 1880, Uniontown, Pennsylvania, . died October 16, 1959, Washington, . general of the army and . Army chief of staff during World War II (1939–45) and later . secretary of stat. Universalium. Marshall Mission - George C. Marshall with Mao in Yenan.

Profiles the man who helped plan Allied strategy in World War II, developed the European Recovery Act, better known as the Marshall Plan, and served as ambassador to China

Viashal
“General of the Army: George C. Marshall, Soldier and Statesman” by Ed Cray is an outstanding one-volume biography of one of the greatest Americans of the second half of the twentieth century. General of the Army George Catlett Marshall dedicated his long life to serving the country he loved, and he served in many positions. First, he was a U.S. Army officer, eventually rising to the position of Army Chief of Staff and the five-star rank of General of the Army during World War II. Later, he served as Secretary of State and Secretary of Defense in the Truman Administration. He was a winner of the Nobel Peace Prize for developing the Marshall Plan for the economic recovery of Europe in the postwar years.

Ed Cray takes readers much further into Marshall’s life than these simple facts. Cray shows us a highly complex man who was outwardly very reserved – Cray likens him to George Washington – and of such high rectitude that when President Roosevelt called him “George” during a meeting, Marshall corrected him: “it is General Marshall, Mr. President.” Few people knew of Marshall’s hot temper, which he found difficult to control in his youth and early military career, but which he eventually mastered. Marshall was unafraid to speak truth to power, as he spoke bluntly with Roosevelt, Truman, and Truman aide Clark Clifford on more than one occasion.

I first read “General of the Army: George C. Marshall, Soldier and Statesman” a few years ago after I discovered a used paperback edition of it in a used bookstore. I’ve always been fascinated by military history, and I knew almost nothing about Marshall except what I read in other World War II histories. Ed Cray does an absolutely masterful job of bringing George C. Marshall to light. Cray’s narrative flows beautifully in elegant prose. This is certainly a very favorable biography, but Cray is unafraid to criticize Marshall and show his faults.

George C. Marshall may not be as well known as other World War II American generals, namely Eisenhower, Patton, and MacArthur. As Cray points out, one reason for this is that Roosevelt felt he needed Marshall to remain as Chief of Staff instead of being appointed the commanding general of Overlord (D-Day). Eisenhower got the D-Day command and eventually served two terms as President of the United States; both Patton and MacArthur saw their careers end on sour notes; and Marshall went on to serve quietly but brilliantly in the Truman Administration, where he made his mark on history with the plan named for him.

“General of the Army: George C. Marshall, Soldier and Statesman” is a magnificent biography of one of the towering figures in American history. Most highly recommended.
Vut
This is a very thorough and positive biography of George Marshall, who is one of the great soldiers and statesmen in the history of the United States. This book focuses heavily on World War Ii, as it should, although Marshall's post-WWII contributions were also substantial. This country was fortunate to have Marshall in the position he was in in preparation for and conduct of WWII. As a result, there was someone in charge who was a true patriot and who was able to dispassionately evaluate subordinate officer and assure that the best were promoted and placed in key positions, without regard to politics. Thus, Roosevelt, unlike Lincoln, did not have to go through a succession of leaders before finding the rights ones. Marshall gave up the command of the battle in Europe (not necessarily voluntarily but he did not complain) in order to remain in overall charge of the Army, which undoubtedly was more suitable service given his skills and the trust Roosevelt had in him. After WWII, Marshall served as Secretary of State and Secretary of Defense under Truman, and, as a result, fell out of favor with the Republicans for solely partisan reasons. No one could have "saved" China from take over by the Communists, given Chiang's incompetence and corruption, which has been well documented in many places. Having read biographies of Roosevelt, MacArthur, Eisenhower, Bradley and other accounts of WWII, it was illuminating to have the military view from above, so to speak.
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There is a great debate in history over the impact of the "Great Man" on events. Those who favor a view of history that says that many of the courses it takes reflect conscious decisions by the "Greats" (both good and evil) will surely see Ed Cray's biography of General George C. Marshall as buttressing that side of the argument.

I've read a lot of books about World War II and while Marshall gets his due, he is always overshadowed by the commanders-in-the-field. Understandable, since individuals other than the General-in-Chief had to actually fight at Midway, Normandy, Iwo Jima, etc. Those tactical victories were the result of a strategy of American war largely crafted by Marshall, and more importantly, held in place by him when other's dithered or tried to adjust to their fears or local opportunities for aggrandizement. Success in war did not spell relief for George Marshall. President Truman tapped him as Secretary of State where he fought as effectively for success in crafting the peace that existed between the expansionist Soviets and the West until the demise of the former.

As the organizer of the American effort in WWII, Marshall's service was unparalleled. Cray gives a lot of coverage on how Marshall developed a minor military organization (the American Army had less than a quarter of a million men two years prior to Pearl Harbor. Sixteen million would wear American uniforms over the course of the war-over 8 million in the Army) into the colossus that would find itself astride much of the globe less than four years later. That feat is often under-covered in histories, but the import of raising and equipping a large modern army from a very small base, finding (and relieving) commanders, providing substantial equipage to keep allies in the war, developing and deploying equipment that could meet the challenges of the modern battlefield, and learning lessons from early setbacks, fell on Marshall's shoulders to a large extent. In addition, he had to serve as a master diplomat to coordinate with allies and political decision makers and the Navy as well as serve as explainer/lobbyist on Capitol Hill. Our success was in no small part his success. No small part of his success was due to his effective management of Roosevelt and Churchill, both given to impulse thoughts, prejudices, and sometimes cold feet on how the war should be waged

Cray also cover's Marshall's second significant public service in two cabinet slots, most significantly as Secretary of State for Harry Truman. Marshall largely conceived of the plan for economic aid to Europe to forestall Soviet expansionism (what other's called the Marshall Plan) and NATO.

The value of this biography is not only the record of Marshall's impact and achievements, but also a deep exploration of the character of the man and his methods of work. This would be an excellent book for anyone interested in leadership development or young people wondering how to craft themselves for success in the world of organizations. As Cray demonstrates, Marshall's reputation and the respect he drew from almost every quarter were integral to his success and his ability to cause others to follow the path to which he pointed.

As in any good biography, the author discusses Marshall's failures as well. He advanced some officers to senior command who he had to recall, was slow on advocating integration of the armed forces and recognition of Israel and did not forcefully advocate for relieving MacArthur from command when it was obvious that MacArthur was insubordinate and a strategic problem with his actions and statements during the Korean Conflict. Some of these of course are errors in hindsight; history shows that high ranking peace time officers do not always make good battlefield commanders (and you don't know until they have to try and wage battle) and there were real strategic risks in recognizing the Jewish State Marshall was concerned about in the late 1940s (which to some extent were borne out with the Arab oil embargo of the 1970s).

At over seven hundred pages, this is a thorough one-volume biography. Cray does an excellent job of telling the history and assessing the man. He was a patriot, a self-less public servant, clear headed and honest and forthright with those who worked under him and for whom he worked. One can only come away thinking that our country was lucky to have Marshall where he was a critical junctures in our history.