» » Salt Warriors: Insurgency on the Rio Grande (Canseco-Keck History Series)

Download Salt Warriors: Insurgency on the Rio Grande (Canseco-Keck History Series) fb2

by Paul Cool
Download Salt Warriors: Insurgency on the Rio Grande (Canseco-Keck History Series) fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Paul Cool
  • ISBN:
    160344016X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1603440165
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Texas A&M University Press; 1st Edition edition (January 22, 2008)
  • Pages:
    384 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1149 kb
  • ePUB format
    1269 kb
  • DJVU format
    1511 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    307
  • Formats:
    txt lrf lrf rtf


Salt Warriors: Insurgency. has been added to your Cart.

Salt Warriors: Insurgency.

The El Paso Salt War of 1877 has gone down in history as the spontaneous ?action of a mindless rabble, but as author Paul Cool deftly demonstrates, the episode wa. .Book in the Canseco-Keck History Series Series). Select Format: Hardcover.

Series: Canseco-Keck History Series (11). The El Paso Salt War of 1877 has gone down in history as the spontaneous "action of a mindless rabble," but as author Paul Cool deftly demonstrates, the episode was actually an insurgency, "the product of a deliberate, community-based decision squarely in the tradition of the American nation's original fight for self-government. The Paseños (local Mexican Americans) had held common ownership of the immense salt lakes at the base of the Guadalupe Mountains since the time of Spanish rule. They believed their title was confirmed in the treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo.

Download PDF book format. 11. General Note: "Winner of the 2007 Robert A. Calvert Book Prize" P. 1. Bibliography, etc. Note

Other books in the series. Canseco-Keck History Series (1 - 10 of 14 books).

Apr 13, 2012 Paul Cool rated it it was amazing. Other books in the series.

Следите за тем, как разворачиваются лучшие истории. 2012 г. 0 ответов 0 ретвитов 0 отметок Нравится.

Canseco-Keck History Series

Canseco-Keck History Series. ົວທີ 11. Paul Cool1 ມັງກອນ 2008. The El Paso Salt War of 1877 has gone down in history as the spontaneous action of a mindless rabble, but as author Paul Cool deftly demonstrates, the episode was actually an insurgency, the product of a deliberate, community-based decision squarely in the tradition of the American nation s original fight for self-government. The Pasenos (local Mexican Americans) had held common ownership of the immense salt lakes at the base of the Guadalupe Mountains since the time of Spanish rule.

Canseco-Keck History). Title: Salt Warriors: Insurgency on the Rio Grande.

Book Condition: As New in As New dust jacket. Canseco-Keck History). Publisher: College Station, TX, Texas A & M University Press: ISBN Number: 160344016X. ISBN Number 13: 9781603440165.

insurgency on the Rio Grande. Canseco-Keck history series - no. Classifications. 1st ed. by Paul Cool.

The El Paso Salt War of 1877 has gone down in history as the spontaneous “action of a mindless rabble,” but as author Paul Cool deftly demonstrates, the episode was actually an insurgency, “the product of a deliberate, community-based decision squarely in the tradition of the American nation’s original fight for self-government.” The Paseños (local Mexican Americans) had held common ownership of the immense salt lakes at the base of the Guadalupe Mountains since the time of Spanish rule. They believed their title was confirmed in the treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo. However, to the American businessmen who saw in the white expanse a cash crop that could make them rich in the years following the American Civil War, ownership appeared up for grabs. After years of struggle among Anglo politicians and speculators eager to seize the lakes, an Austin banker staked a legal claim in 1877, and his son-in-law, Charles Howard, started to enforce it. Cool chronicles the ensuing popular uprising that disrupted established governmental authority in El Paso for twelve weeks. Unique features of this pioneering book include the author’s employment of previously untapped sources and the first thorough and systematic use of familiar ones, notably the government report El Paso Troubles in Texas, to create this detailed study of the war. First-person accounts from reports and newspaper items create a landmark day-by-day account of the San Elizario battle, including the location of the Texas Ranger positions. This fast-paced account not only corrects the record of this historical episode but will also resonate in the context of today’s racial and ethnic tensions along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Xaluenk
I have just read quite a few pages through google's scanned book selections and all I can say is that Paul Cool Has written a extremely well written and well balanced book! The book appears to not just talk about the anglo american experience in the San Elzario Salt war but clearly includes biographies about such El Paso luminaries as Gregorio Garcia and Telesforo Montes of San Elizario. It's clear that rare books by George Wythe Baylor and John Russell Bartlett were utilized in a strong capacity. The Salt war (which probably began with James Maggofin's use of force in the 1840's as a means to privatize salt in the El Paso region) is evolving into key event in Mexican-American history. The changing alliances, Mexican leaders, and poor documentation of this event seemed hidden for such a long time. Only now are we gaining a strong understanding of who the primary actors were and how this event took shape decades before 1877, the civil war, or even the Mexican-American War. Also using the census records of El Paso in 1860 and the Mesilla Census of 1870, we can see that there was a diaspora of Mexican Americans from La Isla because of Confederate (Texan) incursion. Now take into account that John Kinney, Albert Fountain, and many Mexican-American Mesilleros know first hand about the atrocities committed in the Salt War of 1877 and you probably have an important ingredient for the beginning of the Lincoln County War. This is strongly supported by Cool's book about the trouble caused by confederate troops in Ysleta, Socorro, and San Elizario. Many other books, such as Mill's Forty years at El Paso and Sonnichson's Six who came to El Paso mention that Mexican-Americans left La Isla, but never provided referenced atrocities committed by Confederates, such as what cool does! Lastly, kind of surprised How cool Excellently talked about the irony of how Chico Barela as leader of the mob in the Salt War, left for Mexico and eventually met up with George Wythe Baylor's Texas Rangers. Baylor had a warrant for Barela's arrest but instead chose to unite with Barela in order to hunt down Victorio, the apache chief. Well it just seems that this event demonstrates how the Apaches were always the prime concern of people living along this region of texas and new mexico. Well, bottom line is that I've purchased and finish this amazing book and I didn't know Mr. Cool was such a scholar of the south west but definitely welcome sboard!!!!
Wanenai
Wonderfully researched account by the late Paul Cool. This is a must have for anyone who wants to understand El Paso history.
Shalizel
My family was involved in the salt wars in San Elizario. This book answered a lot of questions and cleared up a lot of myths that have been handed down through the generations. As far as I can tell, my Great Grandfather was orphaned because of the war. I'm amazed this story is but a side note in American history. It deserves more attention as do those that fought and suffered because of greed.
Weiehan
The best book about the war over the salt flats just west of the Guadalupe Mountains in West Texas.
Zargelynd
No comment
Marige
Although not as resonant in American borderland history as the Alamo or San Jacinto, the El Paso Salt War left a lasting imprint in Anglo-Hispanic relations, especially in western Texas and New Mexico. With this first full-length study of the Paseño insurrection in El Paso and environs, borderlands historian Paul Cool has advanced both our knowledge of history and our understanding of the roots of present-day borderland issues. Cool, with prodigious research and use of a myriad of untapped primary source material, has shed new light on this 1877 insurgency that saw murderous clashes between Mexican-Americans, known as Paseños, and newly arrived Anglo-Americans.

Hispanic settlers had apparently been communally utilizing and selling nearby salt deposits as a cash crop for generations. With the coming of Anglos and a differing concept of resource ownership, a culture clash and an ensuing clash of arms was inevitable. Paseños thought the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo guaranteed their unfettered access to the salt even as the region was ceded by Mexico to the U.S., but the Anglo-dominated Texas legislature had other notions. Mix in the personal tragedy of putative manager of the salt lakes and provocateur of Paseños, Charles H. Howard, his angst explained by Cool's insightful analysis of his humiliation and his southern notions of honor and gratitude, and the triumph of violence over diplomacy was unavoidable. And triumph it did, for three deadly months.

Neither institutions nor individuals come off particularly well- the Texas Rangers, the U. S. Army, local law officers, the main protagonists or antagonists- although the author probes the motives and depths of each and makes it all compelling. Most on the Anglo side are incompetent or craven to one degree or another, several are plain cowardly. Others, notably a Silver City contingent of hardcases masquerading as a peace force, led by Dan Tucker and John Kinney and including killer Jim McDaniels, are worse, functioning as little more than a gang of robbers, rapists and murderers. An especially valuable section for the reader's closure is a follow-up on the key participants in the Salt War drama, tracing their later, post-insurrection, years, often with poignancy.

This overdue study is beautifully written, and is a significant achievement in the scholarship of southwestern history.