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Download Social Change in an Industrial Town: Patterns of Progress in Warren, Pennsylvania, from Civil War to World War I fb2

by Michael P. Weber
Download Social Change in an Industrial Town: Patterns of Progress in Warren, Pennsylvania, from Civil War to World War I fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Michael P. Weber
  • ISBN:
    0271012013
  • ISBN13:
    978-0271012018
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Penn State University Press (October 10, 1991)
  • Pages:
    196 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1817 kb
  • ePUB format
    1133 kb
  • DJVU format
    1627 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
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    442
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Weber, Michael P. Publication date. University Park : Pennsylvania State University Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Weber, Michael P. Urbanization, Occupational mobility. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on August 21, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Young, A. (1967) The Democratic Republicans of New York. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

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A journal of a surveying trip into western Pennsylvania under Andrew Ellicott in the year 1795; when the towns of Erie, Warren, Franklin, and Waterford were laid out. Rouse Home. American Legion Post 135, Warren, PA 16365.

TAGS Sociology, Social Mobility, new social history, Michael Katz, new urban history.

There were no overarching social history theories that emerged developed to explain urban development. TAGS Sociology, Social Mobility, new social history, Michael Katz, new urban history.

xvi + 339 pp. Tables, charts, appendixes, manuscript sources, and index. Inspiration from urban geography and sociology, as well as a concern with workers (as opposed to labor union leaders), families, ethnic groups, racial segregation, and women's roles have proven useful. Historians now view the contending groups within the city as "agents" who shape the direction of urbanization.

ISBN 9780271012018 (978-0-271-01201-8) Hardcover, Penn State University Press, 1991. Coauthors & Alternates.

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865, fought between the northern United States (loyal to the Union) and the southern United States (that had seceded from the Union and formed the . .

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865, fought between the northern United States (loyal to the Union) and the southern United States (that had seceded from the Union and formed the Confederacy). The civil war began primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people.

Using quantitative as well as verbal data, this book examines the social and geographic mobility of unskilled, semiskilled and skilled workers during the oil boom years of the 1870s and 1880s and the more stable 1890s and 1900s in an industrial town or northwestern Pennsylvania. Also analyzed are the differing rates of mobility or various ethnocultural groups living within the community.

A hamlet in 1813, Warren was a lumber center briefly in the 1840s, then declined because of excessive logging, national depressions, and a disastrous downtown fire. After the first oil strike in 1875, Warren's population grew from 2,000 to 11,000 in just over three decades, having developed varied industries to replace sole reliance on timber or oil.

Dr. Weber traces the origins of the people or Warren—whether native or foreign-born—and their movement, both geographical (including some departures from the community) and social (mostly upward but downward for some). He also considers the factors—public education, acquisition of skills, inheritance of property, and entrepreneurship—contributing to social movement.

The book argues that social mobility was directly related to the industrial growth of the community, introducing extensive comparisons of other 19th-century towns in support of this thesis. Comparisons also suggest that community size and structure influenced both mobility and labor conditions.