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by Remi Nadeau
Download Fort Laramie and the Sioux (American Forts Series.) fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Remi Nadeau
  • ISBN:
    0803283520
  • ISBN13:
    978-0803283527
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Nebraska Press (September 1, 1982)
  • Pages:
    335 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1703 kb
  • ePUB format
    1408 kb
  • DJVU format
    1709 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    273
  • Formats:
    mobi lrf docx doc


Fort Laramie and the Sioux. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library.

Fort Laramie and the Sioux. inlibrary, printdisabled,, china.

Remi Nadeau is not a professional historian and has written this book based largely . He writes well, and he sees Fort Laramie in a broad context.

Remi Nadeau is not a professional historian and has written this book based largely on secondary sources. As a result, you won't find new material but you'll find an effective retelling of this story. Sadly, the National Park Service does not see the site so broadly, preferring to focus on restored buildings and period furnishings purchased on the market. As a result, this book would supplement nicely any visit to Fort Laramie National Historic Site, providing a much richer context than the NPS provides. One person found this helpful.

The Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851 was signed on September 17, 1851, between United States treaty commissioners and representatives of the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Crow, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations

The Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851 was signed on September 17, 1851, between United States treaty commissioners and representatives of the Cheyenne, Sioux, Arapaho, Crow, Assiniboine, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nations. The treaty was an agreement between nine more or less independent parties. The treaty set forth traditional territorial claims of the tribes as among themselves

Fort Laramie (founded as Fort William and known for a while as Fort John) was a significant 19th-century trading post and diplomatic site located at the confluence of the Laramie and the North Platte rivers.

Fort Laramie (founded as Fort William and known for a while as Fort John) was a significant 19th-century trading post and diplomatic site located at the confluence of the Laramie and the North Platte rivers. They joined in the upper Platte River Valley in the eastern part of the . The fort was founded as a private trading post in the 1830s to service the overland fur trade.

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The history of Native Americans in North America dates back thousands of.

The history of Native Americans in North America dates back thousands of years. Exploration and settlement of the United States by Americans and Europeans wreaked havoc on the Indian peoples living there. This treaty was to bring peace between the whites and the Sioux who agreed to settle within the Black Hills reservation in the Dakota Territory. The Black Hills of Dakota are sacred to the Sioux Indians. In the 1868 treaty, signed at Fort Laramie and other military posts in Sioux country, the United States recognized the Black Hills as part of the Great Sioux Reservation, set aside for exclusive use by the Sioux people. In 1874, however, Gen.

Part of the American forts series. Founded and operated by trained historians, Ground Zero Books, Lt. serves the book collector, the scholar, and institutions. The impact of Fort Laramie, and of the westward thrust along the Overland Trail, on the high plains Indians-the Sioux, Cheyenne, and Arapaho. We focus on the individual, and pride ourselves on our personal service. Please contact us with your wants, as we have many books not yet listed in our database. Visit Seller's Storefront.

Fort Laramie and the Sioux Indians (1967). The Real Joaquin Murieta (1974). Stalin, Churchill and Roosevelt Divide Europe (1990).

As a college student, Remi majored in American and World History at Stanford University and served as the president of Theta Chi, his college fraternity. He received his Bachelor’s of Arts Degree in 1942. Remi entered into World War II as a commissioned officer in the US Army Air-Corp through ROTC. Fort Laramie and the Sioux Indians (1967).

Arriving at Fort Laramie in mid-June, Kearny met with Sioux leaders during an unseasonable snow storm in an effort to induce them to avoid the evils of liquor offered by the traders and, more importantly, to offer no opposition to the white man’s road through their country. The troops camped along the Laramie approximately two and one-half miles above the post on a grassy bottomland that was to serve as a bivouac from time to time throughout much of the active life of the post.

Book by Nadeau, Remi

Use_Death
Comprehensive historic rendering of which I was most impressed. The author appeared to give a balanced account of Ft Laramie.
Onath
This book tells the story of the Indian wars around Fort Laramie, Wyoming. This story encompasses clashes along the Oregon Trail, through central Wyoming, around Julesberg, Colorado, and up toward the Black Hills. These are the famous campaigns on the northern Plains.

Remi Nadeau is not a professional historian and has written this book based largely on secondary sources. As a result, you won't find new material but you'll find an effective retelling of this story.

Nadeau's interests lie on the US side of the Indian wars but he freely admits the duplicity and injustices that the Americans inflicted on the Natives. He writes well, and he sees Fort Laramie in a broad context. Sadly, the National Park Service does not see the site so broadly, preferring to focus on restored buildings and period furnishings purchased on the market. As a result, this book would supplement nicely any visit to Fort Laramie National Historic Site, providing a much richer context than the NPS provides.
Stanober
I thought I had exhausted finding fresh, literary works on the subject of plains Indian/military history, but this book is a gem. It is sprinkled with wonderful, relevant tidbits to events whose humanity is gone in other efforts. I've read about 400 books on the subject, and this is in the top 5