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by Lesley J. Gordon
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Americas
  • Author:
    Lesley J. Gordon
  • ISBN:
    080782450X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0807824504
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    The University of North Carolina Press; First Edition edition (December 7, 1998)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1677 kb
  • ePUB format
    1395 kb
  • DJVU format
    1882 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    898
  • Formats:
    lit lrf lrf docx


Lesley Gordon's study of George E. Pickett explores the reality of the .

Lesley Gordon's study of George E. Pickett explores the reality of the general's life as well as its romanticized version that survived through the generations. It is the fascinating story of a mediocre military leader who became, through his wife's efforts, one of the heroes of the Lost Cause. Excellent military history informed by recent scholarship in social history, General George E. Pickett in Life and Legend provides a sophisticated analysis of one of the Civil War's most memorable figures. Journal of Southern History.

Gordon, Lesley J. (Lesley Jill)

Gordon, Lesley J. (Lesley Jill). General George E. Pickett in Life and Legend /. by Lesley J. Gordon. p. cm. - (Civil War America). It was the amazing and passionate love story that impressed him: The author has pictured as no other could have done the home life and the home love of one of the Confederacy’s greatest leaders, and the book has all the interest of a beautiful, pathetic romance, around which glows the halo of truth.

By investigating the central role played by his wife LaSalle in controlling his historical image, Gordon illuminates Pickett's legend as well as his life.

Start by marking General George E. Pickett in Life and Legend as Want to Read . George E. Pickett is among the most famous Confederate generals of the Civil War. But even today he remains imperfectly understood, a figure shrouded in Lost Cause mythology. Pickett in Life and Legend as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. By investigating the central role played by his wife LaSalle in controlling his historical image, Gordon George E.

Her first book, published in 1998, was a biography of the Confederate general George E. Pickett, famed for his failed charge at the Battle of Gettysburg. Gordon, Lesley J. (1998). Pickett in Life and Legend. Chapel Hill, NC: UNC Press. ISBN 978-0-8078-5427-3. Gordon argued that Pickett's posthumous reputation as tragic hero of the Lost Cause was largely the creation of his wife, LaSalle Pickett, who made a living giving talks about her deceased husband on the lecture circuit for more than fifty years after his death, and that his actual achievements were more modest. ; Fellman, Michael; Sutherland, Daniel E. (2003).

Pickett, George E. 1825-1875. Pickett, La Salle Corbell, 1848-1931. Generals - Confederate States of America - Biography. Generals' spouses - Confederate States of America - Biography. United States - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Biography. University of North Carolina Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on July 13, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Pickett's career was solid but not stellar, and Gordon covers it in balanced detail. The story gathers momentum with Pickett's marriage in 1864 to his third wife, LaSalle, and his command at Gettysburg. Following the war, the financially ruined couple fled to Canada to escape prosecution for war crimes, and Pickett was forced to lobby his West Point classmate Ulysses S. Grant for a pardon.

LESLEY GORDON's book makes several distinctive contributions to the literature on Civil War soldiers. Pickett, whose wife, LaSalle Corbell Pickett, helped reshape his image in the postwar years through mendacious autobiographical writing and plain forgery, offers a perfect subject for this last exploration.

The man who gave his name to the greatest failed frontal attack in American military history, George E.

The man who gave his name to the greatest failed frontal attack in American military history, George E. Pickett is among the most famous Confederate generals of the Civil War. But even today he remains imperfectly understood, a figure shrouded in Lost Cause mythology. In this carefully researched biography, Lesley Gordon moves beyond earlier studies of Pickett. By investigating the central role played by his wife LaSalle in controlling his historical image, Gordon illuminates Pickett's legend as well as his life. After exploring Pickett's prewar life as a professional army officer trained at West Point, battle-tested in Mexico, and seasoned on the western frontier, Gordon traces his return to the South in 1861 to fight for the Confederacy. She examines his experiences during the Civil War, including the famed, but failed, charge at the battle of Gettysburg, and charts the decline in his career that followed. Gordon also looks at Pickett's marriage in 1863 to LaSalle Corbell, like him a child of the Virginia planter elite. Though their life together lasted only twelve years, LaSalle spent her five decades of widowhood writing and speaking about her husband and his military career. Appointing herself Pickett's official biographer, she became a self-proclaimed authority on the war and the Old South. In fact, says Gordon, LaSalle carefully and deliberately created a favorable image of her husband that was at odds with the man she had married."Lesley Gordon's study of George E. Pickett explores the reality of the general's life as well as its romanticized version that survived through the generations. . . . Excellent military history informed by recent scholarship in social history, General George E. Pickett in Life and Legend provides a sophisticated analysis of one of the Civil War's most memorable figures.--Journal of Southern History"Insightful and judicious, sometimes unconventional, and combining a clear narrative thread with a persuasive analysis of available evidence, [this] biography is a convincing assessment of George Pickett's place in Confederate history, an intriguing examination of his--and LaSalle's--character and personality, and a valuable look at the Pickett of legend.--Civil War History"The novelty of this elegantly written book resides in the degree to which Gordon, rather than relying heavily on LaSalle, complaining about her, or both, as previous researchers have done, carefully sifts through her various accounts and separates fact from fiction--and suggests the truths that reside in fiction.--Journal of American HistoryThe man who gave his name to the greatest failed frontal attack in American military history, George E. Pickett is among the most famous Confederate generals of the Civil War. But even today he remains imperfectly understood, a figure shrouded in Lost Cause mythology. In this carefully researched biography, Lesley Gordon moves beyond earlier studies of Pickett. By investigating how Pickett's wife LaSalle, who outlived her husband by five decades, helped control his historical image, Gordon illuminates Pickett's legend as well as his life. -->

Zulkishicage
Without a doubt this is absolutely the worst biography which I have had the displeasure to read. First off, the writer takes efforts to discount the writings of LaSalle Corbin Pickett, then relies on them as the bulk of her reference materiel. Whether from a lack of actual source material available or from lack of effort the conclusions are far and away largely conjectural. There are countless instances of "possibly", "perhaps", "maybe", "seems", etc, etc, rather than facts. And practically every conclusion by the author is predicated on the racism of the Picketts. Which in its self is never actually demonstrated by by the author.
BoberMod
I was VERY DISAPPOINTED with the book! It was NOT what I thought it should be. Where research could have ascertained the true age of Mrs. Pickett (censuses, death certificate), for example, the author prefers to speculate, a trait unbefitting a true historian. Imagine accusing a highly acclaimed (by contemporaries) eye-witness -- Mrs. Pickett -- of forgeries, fabrications and lies, based on pre-conceived opinions! That's what author Gordon has done, attacking the deceased widow Mrs. Pickett right up to the last line, where reference is made to her unfinished manuscript, "To date, her final effort at rewriting the past is lost to the historical record." One is forced to question whether it was Mrs. Pickett or it is the author who has rewritten the past ... a century after the fact. As a direct descendant of one of "Pickett's men," I find the book insulting at best! The author has done injustice to history and to those undiscerning people who cannot "smell a rat"!
Doukasa
Lesly Gordon does a well done bio on Pickett the General associated withh three of the greatest disasters of Lee's Northern Army of Virginia. Pickett is obviously associated with the great charge at Gettysburg but also the crushing disaster at Five Forks and within a week the final crushing blow at Saylers Creek where Lee lost over 6,000 soildiers. The bio covers Pickett's early years with the Mexican War where he takes the flag from a wounded Longstreet to bound up the steps at Chapultepec, his realtionship with an Indian maiden that may have included marriage and the son that he seemingly abandoned and left in the northwest. Picket also is involved with a virtual skirmish with England over islands in the northwest near Pugent Sound.
But the best part of the book is Gordon's filling in of Pickett's Civil War career. After an early wounding during the Peninsula Campaign, Pickett's career stays on the back burner until Gettysburg. After discussion of Pickett's role and actions where he actually participates in 1/3 of the charge that holds his name Pickett has other assignments such as the retaking of North Carolina towns and his early defense of Petersburg where he holds back the Union forces with just a few thousand men until Beauregard arrives to take command. Pickett's miring in controversy is well brought out such as his decision to hang former Confederates that were captuted while fighting for the Union in North Carolina and his infamous part in the Five Forks battle where he was away from the fight eating shad and partaking in drink with Rosser and Fitz Lee while his command is virtually wiped out. The later is whispered but little known until after his death. His remnants of command are virtually captured at Sayler's Creek and Lee allegedly discharges him with Anderson and Bushrod Johnson days before Appomatox.
Gordon's bio is fascinating as Pickett seems to be a brave and valiant soldier but one that is immature such as his leaving the lines in Suffolk to visit LaSalle`his future wife who lived a few miles in Chuckatuck, his stepping away from command to party behind the lines at Five Forks and his penchant for writing emotional and whinny battle reports. The latter is probably why Lee had Pickett tear up his Gettysburg report. LaSalle is revealed as a dedicated wife but one that fabricates history to enhance Pickett's reputation. Alleged letters from Pickett that she published are in many cases most likely written by her own hand and recent scholarship has shown gross plagerism and in some cases illogical history where the facts dispute her version of the truth such as Lincoln stopping by to see the Picketts in Richmond. A fascinating account of inconsistencies, Pickett stems the tide at Petersburg abnd fights well at Dinwiddie Court House against Sheridan but then relaxes too much at Five Forks in a very difficult and unsupported position which in the end results in the collapse of Lee's right wing. Gordon does well in removing some of the mystery about Pickett who today is burried near his men at Hollywood Cemetery but seemingly isolated from other Generals burried there.
fabscf
George Pickett could be one of the biggest mysteries of the Civil War. After the war and then his death 10 years later his wife became a celebrated author. She wrote several popular books about the Civil War and specifically George Pickett including one that was suppose to be a collection of his letters to her during the war. The problem is Sallie Pickett's books were more fiction than fact. Creations of her imagination to glorify her husband.
The result is in trying to write a proper biography of George Pickett one has to deal with Sallie Pickett and try to separate the truth from the fantasy. This problem is compounded by the fact that Pickett's actual wartime letters and other papers are locked away and not available to modern scholars.
This is why it is so difficult for a biography of Pickett to be written. It's like putting together a jigsaw puzzle with pieces from another puzzle in the box. Every time you pick up a piece you have to try and decide if it even belongs with the puzzle. That's the very difficult task that Lesley Gordon faced in trying to write this book.
Gordon does do a decent job of weeding out the fiction from the facts. Her writing style is very good and the book is an enjoyable read. She holds no punches and is tough on Pickett when the need requires but also gives him credit for the good things. The problem is there simply are to many gaps in the story which cause her to literally skim over important parts of Pickett's life. His life after the war is barely even touched and Gordon skims over some rather important events, most likely because there is so little factual information available about Pickett concerning those times. Perhaps not Gordon's fault but we as readers are still left scratching our heads wondering what went on.
Lastly due to lack of direct sources i.e. Pickett himself, Gordon is forced to use other indirect sources that aren't always reliable. For example in discussing his being wounded at Gaines Mill Gordon quotes Major John Haskill who accuses Pickett of cowardice. The problem is Haskill had a strong and well known dislike of Pickett and his story is so absurd that I was surprised Gordon chose to even include the account at all.
I think the definitive book on Pickett is still to come. There are simply still to many gaps in his life. Perhaps someday in the future his actual letters and papers will be made available to scholars and then a true in-depth biography of the man can be made. In the meantime this will do.