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by Sharon Butala,Elizabeth McLachlan
Download Gone But Not Forgotten: Tales of the Disappearing Grain Elevators fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Sharon Butala,Elizabeth McLachlan
  • ISBN:
    1896300766
  • ISBN13:
    978-1896300764
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    NeWest Press; First Edition edition (April 1, 2004)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1585 kb
  • ePUB format
    1396 kb
  • DJVU format
    1652 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    686
  • Formats:
    doc azw rtf mobi


Elizabeth McLachlan's GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN is a nostalgia-ridden look at the tall landmarks that once dotted the wheat belt of western Canada.

Elizabeth McLachlan's GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN is a nostalgia-ridden look at the tall landmarks that once dotted the wheat belt of western Canada. In their 1940s and 50s heyday there were over six thousand of these 80-foot tall wood-constructed grain elevators in Canada's western provinces. Now there are only a few hundred remaining. They have all burned, collapsed, or been razed and replaced by more efficient, fire-proof concrete structures, not nearly as picturesque as the old ones

Gone But Not Forgotten book. A great collection of tales about grain elevators, this book should be required reading for anyone interested in the prairie sentinels.

Gone But Not Forgotten book. May 03, 2015 Christopher May rated it it was amazing. A fantastic series of vignettes of elevators and the people associated with them. MacLachlan does a wonderful job of telling both her own stories and stories from the past century of the men and women who worked in and around Canada's beautiful wooden prairie sentinels.

Gone but Not Forgotten. Tales of the Disappearing Grain Elevators. by Elizabeth McLachlan. Published April 2004 by NeWest Press.

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Gone, But Not Forgotten is a 1993 novel written by attorney Phillip Margolin and set in Portland, Oregon. The book was later adapted to a television miniseries.

Gone, But Not Forgotten is a 1993 novel written by attorney Phillip Margolin and set in Portland, Oregon. Elizabeth "Betsy" Tannenbaum is a successful defense lawyer coming off a domestic violence case win when she is hired by reclusive and mysterious businessman Martin Darius to defend him against allegations that he murdered several women and a private investigator and dumped the bodies at a construction site.

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Author of introduction) Elizabeth McLachlan, Gone but Not Forgotten . SIDELIGHTS: Sharon Butala is one of Canada's most respected authors

Author of introduction) Elizabeth McLachlan, Gone but Not Forgotten: Takes of the Disappearing Grain Elevators, NeWest Press (Alberta, Canada), 2004. Contributor to numerous Canadian literary magazines and periodicals. Also author of five plays. SIDELIGHTS: Sharon Butala is one of Canada's most respected authors. As Butala told Linda Leith in Books in Canada, during a May cattle drive at Peter's ranch, Butala "spent the entire day perched on the coral watching the men work-in the middle, she joked afterwards, of a Roy Rogers movie.

Lost But Not Forgotten. Kill Bonescreamer and bring the 'Ancient Artifact' to Rana the Cutta. My attempts to negotiate with de beast have not gone well, resulting mostly in mutual screaming and biting. Rana's 'Ancient Artifact'. Hey,

Not Now. Tales of the Forgotten.

Author Sharon Butala. Books by Sharon Butala: Real Life. 10 9. 10. Perfection of the Morning. Garden of Eden. 8, 10. The Burning White. The Fountains of Silence.

Gone But Not Forgotten:Tales of the Disappearing Grain Elevators is a treasure trove of stories that reach beyond the buildings of timber and nails and put a human face on the history of these towering structures that once represented prosperity and stability on the Prairie landscape. Through a series of biographical sketches and photographs, this book portrays a vivid picture of life in and around Prairie grain elevators over the past century.


Brialelis
This is local history. The writer is not accomplished. The book is precious in that it preserves the stories of people and a way of life - Canadians in the prairie provinces, chiefly in the 1930s - which are past. Whole communities, each of them centered on grain elevators, are gone. There is almost no way these people and these places could be visited save through the efforts the writer made to produce this volume.
Geny
Elizabeth McLachlan's GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN is a nostalgia-ridden look at the tall landmarks that once dotted the wheat belt of western Canada. In their 1940s and 50s heyday there were over six thousand of these 80-90-foot tall wood-constructed grain elevators in Canada's western provinces. Now there are only a few hundred remaining. They have all burned, collapsed, or been razed and replaced by more efficient, fire-proof concrete structures, not nearly as picturesque as the old ones.

Ms. McLachlan was the wife of a grain agent for twenty years, moving from small town to small town, and her own story, in the twenty-some page Epilogue is possibly the most interesting part of the book. The book's format consists of cobbled together anecdotes from now aging farmers, elevator managers, repair crewmen, and grain agents (and family members of all), which, while charming enough to begin with, become a bit redundant and even a tad tedious after a while.

Yet I liked it, probably because I was an "elevator kid" myself. My dad ran an independent grain elevator and feed store in our small Michigan town for a little more than twenty years and I was a part-time, often reluctant employee there between the ages of 10 and 17 (when I finally rebelled and got a somewhat 'cleaner' job at the local A&P grocery store). In any case, I could relate to the descriptions of the ubiquitous dust and chaff, as I spent countless hours sweeping out the grist mill and warehouses, grinding and bagging loads of corn and oats (mixing in the salt and molasses) for cattle feed. And the long hours of wheat harvest also struck a familiar chord. One of the anecdotes here recalls, "as his father's helper, one of Art's jobs was to climb into the boxcar while it was being loaded and shovel like mad into the corners."

Ah yes, I remember it well. And I had galloping hay fever, so it was a miserable job for me, laboring in those clouds of wheat dust, eyes and nose streaming tears and snot, sneezing and gasping. Not fond memories certainly, but probably good training.

The stories here brought back plenty of memories of my own. I'll probably pass the book along to my older brothers, who served their own time in Dad's mill. If you were a farmer from, say, the forties forward - or worked in a grain elevator - yeah, you'll definitely relate. There are aso some neat vintage photos here and a helpful diagram showing exactly how those tall grain elevators worked. Recommended. (Three and a half stars)

- Tim Bazzett, author of the memoir, REED CITY BOY