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Download The Confederate Army 1861-65, Vol. 2: Florida, Alabama & Georgia (Men-at-Arms) fb2

by Ron Field
Download The Confederate Army 1861-65, Vol. 2: Florida, Alabama & Georgia (Men-at-Arms) fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Ron Field
  • ISBN:
    1841768502
  • ISBN13:
    978-1841768502
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Osprey Publishing (August 10, 2005)
  • Pages:
    48 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1742 kb
  • ePUB format
    1466 kb
  • DJVU format
    1314 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    927
  • Formats:
    lrf lrf lrf lrf


Ron Field is Head of History at the Cotswold School in. 48 pages long, compiled by Ron Field and illustrated by Richard Hook, "The Confederate Army 1861-65 (2), Florida, Alabama, & Georgia" is an excellent book. Published on June 10, 2010.

Ron Field is Head of History at the Cotswold School in. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship in 1982 and taught history at Piedmont High School in California from 1982–83. He is an internationally acknowledged expert on US military history, and was elected a Fellow of the Company of Military Historians, based in Washington.

The Confederate Army 1861-65 (2): "Florida, Alabama & Georgia". 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The Confederate Army 1861-65 (2): "Florida, Alabama & Georgia" from your list? The Confederate Army 1861-65 (2): "Florida, Alabama & Georgia". Florida, Alabama & Georgia". Published August 10, 2005 by Osprey Publishing  .

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The Confederate Army 1861-65 (2): Florida, Alabama & Georgia. Ron Field: Year: 2005.

Ron Field'sThe Confederate Army 1861-65: Tennessee & North Carolinais for any collection strong in Civil War history in general and Confederate history in particular. The Confederate Army 1861-65 (Vo. ) Men At Arms Series. Chapters survey uniforms worn by these volunteers, equipment, and field army experiences, with vintage black and white photos complimenting color illustrations throughout. -The California Bookwatch(January 2008) "A book that rightly belongs on the shelf of any US Civil War enthusiast and one that provides a bit more insight into what is called the first modern war. Highly recommended.

The common image of the Confederate Army during the Civil War (1861-1865) is dominated by a limited number of early photographs of officers and men wearing the gray and butternut associated with the CS regulations and quartermaster issues.

Ron Field, Richard Hook. The Southern states of the Confederacy in 1861 fielded many units of volunteer troops who wore a remarkably wide variety of uniforms, often reflecting foreign influences. The Southern states of the Confederacy in 1861 fielded many units of volunteer troops who wore a remarkably wide variety of uniforms, often reflecting foreign influences

The common image of the Confederate Army during the Civil War (1861-1865) is dominated by a limited number of early photographs of officers and men wearing the gray and butternut associated with the CS regulations and quartermaster issues. This sequence of books examines a much wider field: the original uniforms of the state and volunteer companies which were brought together to form the Confederate field armies, and the continuing efforts to clothe troops as wear-and-tear gradually reduced the originally wide range of uniforms. A mass of information from contemporary documents is illustrated with rare photographs and meticulous color reconstructions.

Anarawield
As anticipated
Not-the-Same
A well written and researched Osprey Publishing book. It is easy to read. A valuable work for miniature wargamers and Civil War reenactors, in particular. Civil War buffs of all kinds should like this book. It could be of some interest to general historians and others.
Meztihn
An excellent addition to the series.
Paster
good
Vudomuro
A good resource for individual uniforms of specific units or companies who fought in the Civil War. Much of this information can not be found elsewhere.
Bumand
A++++
Legionstatic
good
48 pages long, compiled by Ron Field and illustrated by Richard Hook, "The Confederate Army 1861-65 (2), Florida, Alabama, & Georgia" is an excellent book. It is particularly notable among the Men-At-Arms series for containing a history of the contributions made to the Confederate Army by the State of Florida, then a rather inconsequential state with a population of about 140,000 in 1861. It was mocked, as the book notes, in the New York 'Tribune' as "the smallest tadpole in the dirty pool of secession', and Florida's backing of the Confederacy, as well as its history during the Civil War in general, have been much overlooked. One achievement on Florida's part during the war was in addition to ultimately entering some 15,000 troops into Confederate service, Florida was the last Confederate state to lose its capital to the enemy. It had some bizarre aspects besides, however- a number of forts in Florida, among them the Castilla De San Marcos, were soon retaken or kept in Union hands and just sat there for the rest of the war. Florida, despite all its contributions to the CSA, was looked on by some Union leaders as militarily insignificant.

Alabama and Georgia were far more interesting to Union forces, hence the far greater amount of battle they saw, as well as their greater manpower and logistics contributions to the Confederate cause.

With each state, there was a fair number of prewar militia on hand when secession happened, and those units rapidly joined with other volunteers in becoming part of the hastily-formed CS Army. The book discusses uniforms, arms, volunteer aid societies, and a few topics unique to each state. In Florida's case, out-of-state supply is one subject discussed, since Florida had much more in the way of raw materials than finished goods when it seceded in 1861. As a result, Floridian militia and CS Army units had to struggle before they even got into battle, as the purchasing of badly needed uniforms from other states in the CSA was quite a struggle by itself.

This is an interesting and highly informative book, despite its short length. For anyone interested in studying a partial history of these three states and their offerings to the Confederate cause during the Civil War, I highly recommend it.