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by Paul A Cimbala
Download Under the Guardianship of the Nation: The Freedmen's Bureau and the Reconstruction of Georgia, 1865-1870 (Literature; 14) fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Paul A Cimbala
  • ISBN:
    0820318914
  • ISBN13:
    978-0820318912
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Georgia Press; First Edition edition (September 1, 1997)
  • Pages:
    395 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
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    4.3
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Thankfully, Paul Cimbala gives us a much more nuanced and accurate . The Bureau exited Georgia in 1870 with most of the dreams of blacks for freedom yet unfulfilled.

Thankfully, Paul Cimbala gives us a much more nuanced and accurate view of this important yet flawed Reconstruction institution in his insightful study Under the Guardianship of the Nation. To understand Reconstruction, Cimbala contends, one must start by understanding the Bureau. In 1865, local agents, state leaders, and Washington politicians were unclear as to the precise scope of the newly established agency. This is an excellent institutional history, indeed, it is the most detailed state study of the Freedmen's Bureau to date.

The Freedmen's Bureau was an extraordinary agency established by Congress in 1865, born of the expansion of federal power during the Civil War and the Union's desire to protect and provide for the South's emancipated.

The Freedmen's Bureau was an extraordinary agency established by Congress in 1865, born of the expansion of federal power during the Civil War and the Union's desire to protect and provide for the South's emancipated slaves. Charged with the mandate to change the southern racial status quo in education.

The ineffectiveness of the Bureau in Georgia and other southern states has often been blamed on the racism of its northern administrators, but Paul A. Cimbala, in this detailed study, finds the explanation to be much more complex. The Freedmen's Bureau was an extraordinary agency established by Congress in 1865, born of the expansion of federal power during the Civil War and the Union's desire to protect and provide for the South's emancipated slaves.

Cimbala, Paul A. Under the Guardianship of the Nation: The Freedmen's Bureau and the Reconstruction of Georgia, 1865-1870 (1998). Drago, Edmund L. (1992). Black Politicians and Reconstruction in Georgia: A Splendid Failure.

Under the Guardianship of the Nation: The Freedmen's Bureau and the Reconstruction of Georgia, 1865-1870 (Athens: University of Georgia . Freedmen, in Paul A. Cimbala and Randall M. Miller, ed. The Freedmen's.

Books (Essay Collections): A Long and Enduring Reach: Slavery and the American Civil War (essays in honor. Bureau and Reconstruction: Reconsiderations (New York: Fordham University.

Congress created the Freedmen's Bureau but did not fund it for the first year. Cimbala, Paul A. "Under the Guardianship of the Nation: the Freedmen's Bureau and the Reconstruction of Georgia, 1865-1870" U. of Georgia Press, 1997. By 1866, missionary and aid societies worked in conjunction with the Freedmen's Bureau to provide education for former slaves. The primary focus of these groups was to raise funds to pay teachers and manage schools, while the secondary focus was the day-to-day operation of individual schools.

The Freedmen’s Bureau, formally known as the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, was .

The Freedmen’s Bureau, formally known as the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, was established in 1865 by Congress to help millions of former. America’s Reconstruction era was a turbulent time, as the nation struggled with how to rebuild the South and transition the 4 million newly freed blacks from slavery to a free-labor society.

Sara Rapport, "The Freedmen's Bureau as a Legal Agent for Black Men and Women in Georgia: 1865-1868," Georgia Historical Quarterly (1989): 26-53.

This collection of previously published essays, book chapters, and articles brings together in one place a. .Under the Guardianship of the Nation: The Freedmen's Bureau and the Reconstruction of Georgia, 1865-1870.

This collection of previously published essays, book chapters, and articles brings together in one place a sampling of Gallman's writing that concentrates o.Becoming Free in the Cotton South. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1997. Circ Desk) F291 c56 1997). The Freedmen's Bureau and Reconstruction: Reconsiderations. New York: Fordham University Press, 1999.

The Freedmen's Bureau, established by Congress in 1865, was born of the expansion of federal power during the Civil War and the Union's desire to protect and provide for the South's emancipated slaves. Established in Georgia during late 1865 and 1866, the Bureau was positioned to play a crucial role in the implementation of Reconstruction policy, translating directives, laws, and constitutional guarantees into the new reality promised by emancipation. In the end, however, the agency failed to leave a lasting impression on the state. Georgia's citizens were left to themselves to work out their new social, political, and economic arrangements. The ineffectiveness of the Bureau in Georgia and other southern states has often been blamed on the racism of its northern administrators, but the explanation of its failure is not so simple. Paul A. Cimbala shows a more complex picture of Reconstruction and the Bureau by examining the intellectual underpinnings of the men who ran the agency and how they organized their command, by exploring the personal stories of men who faced the problems of Reconstruction at the local level, by presenting a detailed account of the events that transpired along the Georgia coast in the Sherman Reservation, and by assessing the agency's work in education, relief, civil rights, and labor.