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by Myra MacPherson
Download The Scarlet Sisters: Sex, Suffrage, and Scandal in the Gilded Age fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Myra MacPherson
  • ISBN:
    0446570249
  • ISBN13:
    978-0446570244
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Twelve; Reprint edition (March 3, 2015)
  • Pages:
    432 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1175 kb
  • ePUB format
    1408 kb
  • DJVU format
    1237 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    850
  • Formats:
    azw txt azw mbr


MacPherson aims her wit and very sharp pen at a side of the suffrage movement rarely seen in history books .

MacPherson aims her wit and very sharp pen at a side of the suffrage movement rarely seen in history books, epitomized by these two real sisters. First, THE SCARLET SISTERS peels back the curtain on the prim, proper Victorian age to reveal a "Gilded Age" that-for women in particular-is corrupt, hypocritical, and frighteningly inhospitable.

The Scarlet Sisters book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Scarlet Sisters: Sex, Suffrage, and Scandal in the Gilded Age as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking The Scarlet Sisters: Sex, Suffrage, and Scandal in the Gilded Age as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The exploits of the Claflin sisters would not be out of place in a modern day tabloid.

The Scarlet Sisters: Sex, Suffrage and Scandal In the Gilded Age is a very approachable book about the lives of Victoria and Tennessee Claflin, two sisters who shocked and scandalized 19th century American society, and how they took the world by storm. The exploits of the Claflin sisters would not be out of place in a modern day tabloid. They courted the press and then fought them off when they wanted to leave their exploits behind. They disobeyed society’s edicts and then reversed this when they moved to England to build a respectable new life for themselves.

For a few years in the 1870s, sisters Victoria Claflin Woodhull and Tennessee Tennie Claflin were the most notorious women in New York, treating the social strictures of their age as no more substantial than the spirits with which they claimed to communicate. Myra MacPherson’s captivating dual biography opens on Wall Street in 1870, as Tennie, a bodacious beauty in her early twenties, and her charismatic elder sister descend from their open carriage amid a throng of reporters and rubberneckers.

Here award-winning author Myra MacPherson deconstructs and lays bare the manners and mores of Victorian America, remarkably illuminating the struggle for equality that women are still fighting today

Here award-winning author Myra MacPherson deconstructs and lays bare the manners and mores of Victorian America, remarkably illuminating the struggle for equality that women are still fighting today. Victoria Woodhull and Tennessee "Tennie" Claflin-the most fascinating and scandalous sisters in American history-were unequaled for their vastly avant-garde crusade for women's fiscal, political, and sexual independence. They escaped a tawdry childhood to become rich and famous, achieving a stunning list of firsts

Here award-winning author Myra MacPherson deconstructs and lays bare the manners and mores of Victorian America, remarkably illuminating the struggle for equality that women are still fighting today.

Here award-winning author Myra MacPherson deconstructs and lays bare the manners and mores of Victorian America, remarkably illuminating the struggle for equality that women are still fighting today. They escaped a tawdry childhood to become rich and famous, achieving a stunning list of firsts

Here award-winning author Myra MacPherson deconstructs and lays bare the manners and mores of Victorian America . Vividly telling their story, Myra MacPherson brings these inspiring and outrageous sisters brilliantly to life. They escaped a tawdry childhood to become rich and famous, achieving a stunning list of firsts.

Myra MacPherson is the award-winning and bestselling author of four previous books, including The Power Lovers, the Vietnam War classic Long Time Passing, and All Governments Lie. She was an acclaimed journalist at the Washington Post, and has also written for the New York Times.

She lives in Washington, . More books by Myra MacPherson.

Victoria Woodhull and Tennessee "Tennie" Claflin - the most fascinating and scandalous sisters in American history - were unequaled for their vastly avant-garde crusade for women's fiscal, political, and sexual independence. Above: A newspaper cartoon of Victoria and Tennie as Wall Street traders. Excerpted from The Scarlet Sisters: Sex, Suffrage, and Scandal in the Gilded Age by Myra MacPherson. Published in March 2014 by Twelve Books.

A fresh look at the life and times of Victoria Woodhull and Tennie Claflin, two sisters whose radical views on sex, love, politics, and business threatened the white male power structure of the nineteenth century and shocked the world. Here award-winning author Myra MacPherson deconstructs and lays bare the manners and mores of Victorian America, remarkably illuminating the struggle for equality that women are still fighting today. Victoria Woodhull and Tennessee "Tennie" Claflin-the most fascinating and scandalous sisters in American history-were unequaled for their vastly avant-garde crusade for women's fiscal, political, and sexual independence. They escaped a tawdry childhood to become rich and famous, achieving a stunning list of firsts. In 1870 they became the first women to open a brokerage firm, not to be repeated for nearly a century. Amid high gossip that he was Tennie's lover, the richest man in America, fabled tycoon Cornelius Vanderbilt, bankrolled the sisters. As beautiful as they were audacious, the sisters drew a crowd of more than two thousand Wall Street bankers on opening day. A half century before women could vote, Victoria used her Wall Street fame to become the first woman to run for president, choosing former slave Frederick Douglass as her running mate. She was also the first woman to address a United States congressional committee. Tennie ran for Congress and shocked the world by becoming the honorary colonel of a black regiment.

Ericaz
The story of these two women was an informative and satisfying read. The facts are dry, but the underlying passion of women for equality is enlightening and sometimes entertaining. Ms. MacPherson obviously spent a good deal of time researching her subjects, and when the truth was questionable, she offered up all perspectives so the reader could draw his/her own conclusions. Reading this, I was repeatedly stunned by how their story compares to our fight 150 years later. Kudos to Ms. MacPherson for illustrating the old saw: "...the more things change, the more they stay the same..."
Velan
I was completely swept away by this book . . . while the historical context of their lives would be fascinating enough, the narrative is driven by the power of great storytelling. I felt as if I was seeing it as I read it, and wishing I'd had the chance to meet these crazy-wonderful women. I highly recommend this to everyone who's looking for compelling stories about people who have bucked the traditions of their times to lead extraordinary lives . . . even more so if you appreciate truthful tales of how you really can come from almost nothing and still accomplish extraordinary things.
Keath
Who knew that a woman ran for President in the 1800's. The story tells how medicine show daughters reached the pinnacle of society in New York City, were stockbrokers and influenced the Women's Movement. At one time they were well known lecturers and always had a scheme ongoing.
Dont_Wory
I loved this book for a bunch of reasons. First, THE SCARLET SISTERS peels back the curtain on the prim, proper Victorian age to reveal a "Gilded Age" that--for women in particular--is corrupt, hypocritical, and frighteningly inhospitable. Second, the book reminded me that the seeds of today's "women's issues debates" were planted not in the 1960s and `70s--but the 1860s and `70s. Next, I loved Myra MacPherson's writing. It could have been shrill and polemical; instead, she infused the story with just the right amount of wit and even the occasional wink. Finally, it was a timely reminder for me (and other grumpy, middle aged white men of my ilk) that, while American women may have come a long way, baby, they've still got a long way to go.
Dukinos
This book was a thrill to read. First off, the subject matter is brilliant. I had no idea how revolutionary and powerful the sisters were. It is fascinating, and sometimes frustrating, to read about them fighting battles that were incredibly brave for their time--some of which still rage on today. I learned so much about systems of power and the history of power: gender, social, economic, sexual. Fascinating and inspiring.

What's more, the writing is extremely good. MacPherson tells her story in such a natural, exciting, narrative-driven way that it feels like a novel, only with the amazing distinction of all being true. She does an excellent job of connecting the sisters to the present without being heavy-handed. Also she doesn't protect her subjects or spare them criticism. She paints their flaws and contradictions, even if it's clear that their lives had some problematic aspects.

MacPherson also spread her insights to a supporting cast of characters such as Susan B. Anthony, The Beechers, and other famous Americans. She skillfully disrupts the common narrative around many known figures.

All in all, this was fantastic read, and both Victorian-era enthusiasts and those new to exploring the era will find a fresh new perspective.
Goodman
I liked learning about this two sisters from a restricted time period for women, but the story dragged on. Sometimes too much detail. I would skip over some of the unnecessary facts. I also thought it would never end and had to force myself to read the last chapters. yet I learned in more depth the fight these 2 sisters and all the suffragettes endured for women's rights.
Arcanefire
Myra MacPherson is a fearsome researcher and a wonderful writer. This book reads like a novel. The sisters are smart scoundrels, the families are tv-ready, the facts are hard to believe. I am totally enjoying the read -- and the parallels with our own Gilded Age. Get a copy and dive in!
The subject matter covered in the book is amazing - to think that women were faceing the sme issues as today even way back then. I thnk the writing was too wordy and very difficult to stay interested in. Entirely too much about Henry Ward Beecher - at least for me. More about that and a few other thing than I ever wanted to know. It is good that she brought up this subject so the sister can get some of the recognition they deserve.