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by Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley
Download 1772 Philadelphia Furniture Price Book: A Facsimile (PRIMARY SOURCES IN AMERICAN ART) fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley
  • ISBN:
    0876331886
  • ISBN13:
    978-0876331880
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Acc Us Distribution Book Title; Slp edition (August 2, 2006)
  • Pages:
    96 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1611 kb
  • ePUB format
    1166 kb
  • DJVU format
    1467 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    178
  • Formats:
    doc azw txt lit


This book is actually two books. The first book is a facsimile of the original 1772 Philadelphia Furniture Price Book. Reading the price book you learn that the primary wood on exposed surfaces for furniture was imported mahogany, and the secondary wood was local walnut.

This book is actually two books. The book was known to have existed as there were references to it but no known copy of the text existed until one was found in an attic in 2003. Certain items were also listed for prices in aromatic red cedar as well utilitarian pieces and interior or non-visible elements in yellow popular and white pine or oak.

In 1772, a group of Philadelphia craftsmen published Prices of Cabinet and Chair .

In her introductory essay, Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley explains how this seemingly simple book of lists provides an extraordinary view into the world of furniture making in Philadelphia in the latter part of the eighteenth century.

This book will stay in my library, but i was hoping for more views/teaching strategy for life drawing. The two essays are interesting. The Eakins portion is all perspective. Just when you thought you knew all the ins and outs of the life of one of America's greatest artists, Thomas Eakins, even through attending one of the many fine museum exhibitions of his work that seem to be always in circulation, up pops this publication brought out some five years ago - a first publication of Eakins' 'textbook' on drawing, based on.

In her introductory essay, Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley explains how this seemingly simple book of lists provides an extraordinary view into the world of furniture making in Philadelphia in the latter part of the eighteenth century

In her introductory essay, Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley explains how this seemingly simple book of lists provides an extraordinary view into the world of furniture making in Philadelphia in the latter part of the eighteenth century. By quantifying what was valued in design and style based on the extra amount the patron was willing to pay for embellishments, The 1772 Philadelphia Price Book unveils the "art and mystery" of Philadelphia furniture making.

While some standardisation of prices within the craft had occurred in both Europe and America prior to 1772, the Philadelphia publication is the first furniture price book known to have been printed. This single surviving copy, now. List Price: $ 2. 5. Price: {price-updating}

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Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley books online. Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 3 of 3 results. Most popular Price, low to high Price, high to low Publication date, old to new Publication date, new to old. 52% off. The 1772 Philadelphia Furniture Price Book.

A Facsimile (Primary Sources in American Art). by Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley

A Facsimile (Primary Sources in American Art). by Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley. Published January 25, 2008 by ACC Us Distibution Book Titles.

For any information you can contact us at (610) 648-0230.

In 1772 , a group of Philadelphia craftsmen published Prices of Cabinet and Chair Work , a thirty-six-page book listing the furniture forms they made along with suggested retail prices and the rates master furniture makers should pay journeymen for particular items. While some standardisation of prices within the craft had occurred in both Europe and America prior to 1772, the Philadelphia publication is the first furniture price book known to have been printed. This single surviving copy, now in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, contains fifty-six headings for furniture forms, including desks, bookcases, high chests, chairs, sofas, beds, clothes presses, and numerous tables for specialized uses. Listed below each heading are choices for variations in the design and styling, with three columns to the right giving, respectively, the price to be charged for each option in mahogany or walnut as the primary wood and the amount that should be paid to the journeymen who produced the compo

Keel
i am working on a book my late husband researched and wrote about where washington stayed everyday during the american revolutionary war. i was hoping to get a picture of benjamin randolph's cabinet shop and his home over it on chesnut street, because washington stayed there in 1775 and again in 1776. (benjamin randolph custom-built the desk for thomas jefferson which he used while writing the declaration of independence.)

the book has wonderful information about what kinds of furniture were available from the different furniture makers of philadelphia during this time frame. it is truly one of a kind in that regard.

it didn't solve my research problem, but it was an interesting find. i was glad i bought it and recommend it to anyone, especially someone wanting to know more about one of the 18th century precursors to the modern in-home catalog.
Usaxma
1772 Philadelphia Furniture Price Book: A Facsimile. Companion book by Alexandra Alevizatos Kirtley . 96 pages. 2006

This book is actually two books. The first book is a facsimile of the original 1772 Philadelphia Furniture Price Book. The book was known to have existed as there were references to it but no known copy of the text existed until one was found in an attic in 2003. The book is replicated here in size and color complete with the handwritten notes on the end papers that the known book has. The second book is an explanation of the history of the book, the furniture trade and products covered in the era as well as some other interesting information related to the topic. The supporting text is authored by the Associate Curator of American Decorative Arts for the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Essentially the Furniture Price Book was an attempt to self regulate an industry. There were established prices for final products as well as what would be paid to the workman manufacturing the products. This protected both the employer and the employee. Workers knew how much they were to be paid and employers knew what their labor costs were. In effect this created a closed shop city and business up and down the coast. Manufactures agreed to abide by the book and thereby control wages and prices. If some one tried to price outside the guide they would jeopardize their relationships to suppliers. Part of the agreement as to costs related to the prices for raw material. The consortium used its power to buy in bulk and those outside of the organization would have to pay an exorbitant amount for raw materials if the suppliers would even sell to them.

The book accompanies an exhibit, The Fix on Colonial Philadelphia Furniture: A Secret Guide to Cabinetmakers' Prices, which was at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from July 3, 2008 - February 22, 2009. The exhibit featured pieces referenced in the book which are part of the museums collection.

Reading the price book you learn that the primary wood on exposed surfaces for furniture was imported mahogany, and the secondary wood was local walnut. Certain items were also listed for prices in aromatic red cedar as well utilitarian pieces and interior or non-visible elements in yellow popular and white pine or oak.

The typical wage for a skilled laborer in Philadelphia at this time was about ten shillings per day; those for a journeyman furniture maker were typically between 15 and 25 shillings for a days work. A day's work was about ten hours. Knowing this allows the reader of the price book to determine how long it took to manufacture a particular item and to determine the % of profit for the shop owner. That % though included the cost of materials, advertising, insurance, facilities etc. Remember that furniture in common homes was quite scarce given the fact that each piece was handmade and therefore not as cheap as today's furniture.

A few examples are in order. The lowest price coffin listed in the book was for two pounds ten shillings (there were twenty shillings to the pound and twelve pence to the shilling, and thus 240 pence to the pound.) Therefore the cheapest coffin was worth about five days wages for a typical laborer in Philadelphia. This price was about the same for a simple easy chair. Window blinds list for 11 schillings in mahogany and six shillings, six pence in walnut. Picture frames stained black four feet by three feet cost one pound, 15 shillings.

This book provides an interesting insight into cost of living and material in colonial society.