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by James M. McPherson,Ulysses S. Grant
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Americas
  • Author:
    James M. McPherson,Ulysses S. Grant
  • ISBN:
    0140437010
  • ISBN13:
    978-0140437010
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Penguin Classics (January 1, 1999)
  • Pages:
    704 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1231 kb
  • ePUB format
    1438 kb
  • DJVU format
    1837 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    830
  • Formats:
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On every page, his narrative has the simple directness of the finest English prose, inspired by the King James Bible on which he had been raised. The overall effect is both intimate and majestic.

Ships from and sold by SherwoodAuctions. On every page, his narrative has the simple directness of the finest English prose, inspired by the King James Bible on which he had been raised.

The Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant is an autobiography by Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th President of the United States, focused mainly on his military career during the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War, and completed as he was dying. Grant, the 18th President of the United States, focused mainly on his military career during the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War, and completed as he was dying of throat cancer in 1885. The two-volume set was published by Mark Twain shortly after Grant's death. Twain created a unique marketing system designed to reach millions of veterans with a patriotic appeal just as Grant's death was being mourned

Title: Personal Memoirs By: Ulysses S. Grant, James M. McPherson Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 792 Vendor: Penguin Classics Publication Date: 1999

Title: Personal Memoirs By: Ulysses S. McPherson Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 792 Vendor: Penguin Classics Publication Date: 1999. Dimensions: . 2 X . 3 X . 2 (inches) Weight: 1 pound 1 ounce ISBN: 0140437010 ISBN-13: 9780140437010 Stock No: WW37010. Ron Chernow, in Grant. Faced with cancer and financial ruin, Ulysses S. Grant wrote his personal memoirs to secure his family's future-and won himself a unique place in American letters.

Personal Memoirs of Ulysses . rant. Imprint: Penguin Classics. Faced with cancer and financial ruin, the Civil War's greatest general and former president, Ulysses S. Grant wrote his personal memoirs to secure his family's future. Published: 24/06/1999. In doing so he won himself a unique place in American letters. Acclaimed by writers as diverse as Mark Twain and Gertrude Stein, Grant's memoirs demonstrate the intelligence, intense determination, and laconic modesty that made him the Union's foremost commander. PERSONAL MEMOIRS is devoted almost entirely to his life as a soldier.

Personal Memoirs Penguin Classics. Издание: перепечатанное.

Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, by Ulysses S. Grant (read 4 Sep 2017) I have intended to read this work for over 20 years and finally have done so. It is full of interesting material, including. Personal Memoirs Penguin Classics.

Ulysses Simpson Grant. Ulysses Simpson Grant. Издание: иллюстрированное, перепечатанное. Personal Memoirs of U.

Start reading Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App. Product details. Paperback: 704 pages.

PERSONAL MEMOIRS is devoted almost entirely to his life as a soldier

PERSONAL MEMOIRS is devoted almost entirely to his life as a soldier. For their directness and clarity, his writings on war are without rival in American Literature. The best of any general's since Caesar. A unique expression of the national character. has conveyed the suspense which was felt by himself and his army and by all who believed in the Union cause. The reader finds himself.

Personal Memoirs of . Ulysses S. Grant With the help of his publisher, Mark Twain, Grant wrote to the last month of his life to leave . . Considered among the greatest of military memoirs, these two volumes were an immediate bestseller. With the help of his publisher, Mark Twain, Grant wrote to the last month of his life to leave a legacy for his family after being defrauded a year earlier of his estate.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Personal memoirs of .

“The foremost military memoir in the English language, written in a clear, supple style . . . a masterpiece.” —Ron Chernow, in GrantFaced with cancer and financial ruin, Ulysses S. Grant wrote his personal memoirs to secure his family's future—and won himself a unique place in American letters. Acclaimed by writers as diverse as Mark Twain and Gertrude Stein, Grant's memoirs demonstrate the intelligence, intense determination, and laconic modesty that made him the Union's foremost commander. Personal Memoirs is devoted almost entirely to his life as a soldier, tracing the trajectory of his extraordinary career from West Point cadet to general-in-chief of all Union armies. With their directness and clarity, his writings on war are without rival in American literature. This edition of Grant’s Personal Memoirs includes an indispensable introduction and explanatory notes by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian James M. McPherson.

Manona
Many years ago an Army buddy of mine suggested that I take a look at the Memoirs of U.S. Grant, the overall Commander of the Union Army and the 18th US President. The memoirs, he said, were "highly readable."

That is an understatement. U.S. Grant has a deceptively simple writing style which paints the world in which he lived in vivid colors. Grant describes his family background, early life, and the Mexican War in very vivid terms. Grant says very little about his presidency except he expresses some disappointment in his Administration's failure to purchase the Dominican Republic. He claims his purchase of that land would have been to remove blacks from the CONUS, but still give them a nice place to live under the protection of the American government. I found that comment extremely interesting. Apparently the goals of the American Colonization Society of the early 1800s were still around in the 1870s.

The best and most interesting part of the book is Grant's recollection of the Civil War. For those military professionals seeking to emulate his deeds, it is interesting to see what he finds concerning.

During the Civil War Grant mostly speaks of two overwhelming things:

1. Logistics: His accounts of his campaigns focus on trains, rations, ammunition, etc. more than any other detail. What is also interesting is that he organized the wagon trains for the Battle of the Wilderness so that the oxen wouldn't need their forage transported to them.

2. Personnel Actions: Grant thinks very hard about his subordinate officers. He calmly lays out his reasons for firing and hiring the various people and has an interesting read on all of them. Grant is also quite fair. Grant didn't like Prentiss, but Grant still commended Prentiss for his excellent defense at Shiloh's Hornet's Nest.

Grant defends his hard treatment of General Thomas during General Hood's attack into Nashville. It is interesting to read Grant's perspective and then go and read Thomas' perspective. One can decide who is right. Regardless, Thomas did win and Grant didn't replace him with John A. Logan. Grant also lays out his reasons for allowing Sheridan to relieve Gouverneur K. Warren.

Grant proved himself in the Civil War to be a master of internal politics & logistics. His men proved to be expert at the fighting and tactics.

Ultimately, this book is really interesting.
Xava
Great book. Actually I think it is a combination of four volumes. I am still not fininshed after two years of off and on reading. Reading Grants thoughts and hearing his account of conversations with Lincoln, Stanton and Robert E. Lee is fantastic. You read how he was a reluctant soldier and West Point student. His father got him an appointment and the Congressman that appointed him actually changed his name from Hiarm Ulysses to Ulysses S. Grant. His thoughts on the Mexican War in which he was a participant. His views on slavery and appraisals of his generals. How he depended on Sherman and Sheridan to finally defeat the Army of North Virginia.

The story of how Grant came to write this biography after being bankrupt and then diagnosed with cancer when he is encouraged by his friend to put down in writing his recollections and thoughts. That friend was Mark Twain
Fearlesssinger
Ulysses S. Grant's memoir is a pleasure to read. I had just read a Grant biography (by Jean Edward Smith), and so thought that I might as well read Grant's own writings. They came highly recommended, and I think they measure up to that. I had a very high bar for this book after all the praise I had heard, and I think it pretty much hit it. It doesn't go over that bar, but matches it.

Volume 1:
Grant has an interesting viewpoint and clearly sets out his life from its beginnings to the end of the Vicksburg campaign in this volume. His exposition of how things went in the Mexican war and his childhood show off Grant's personality well. They are at times a bit self-deprecating, but you always get the sense that Grant is struggling forward.

Grant writes in a clear way, and he has a nice way of using understatement and sly humor to give criticism, and gives credit where credit is due. He is always explaining how Sherman or Porter were of utmost importance in the campaign for Vicksburg, for example. If you have a Civil War interest, I would definitely recommend this book. If you don't, then this is more iffy.

One minor complaint for the edition I read is that it had no maps. It can be difficult to keep battles straight without good maps, and if you can, look at them while Grant is narrating. It really gives you a much clearer understanding.

Volume 2:

Grant's memoirs are truly a clear and concise way of learning a great deal about the Civil War. He explains the thought process behind decisions, and gives credit where credit is due. He is a bit hard on George Thomas, but other than that, he is very gracious to all, but will give faint praise to those whom he believes did not perform well. The fact that he did this all while dying of throat cancer make it all the more impressive.

If you want to learn more about how the Civil War was fought by one of the most important generals of the time, then this book is an amazing resource. Grant writes clearly, and in a way that is rather engaging even though there are no writing "flourishes". He writes plainly, clearly, and in such a way that you can picture in your mind what is going on. This is no simple feat.

I highly recommend it to anyone interested in the US's Civil War.