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by Shane White
Download Somewhat More Independent: The End of Slavery in New York City, 1770-1810 fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Shane White
  • ISBN:
    0820317861
  • ISBN13:
    978-0820317861
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Univ of Georgia Pr (December 1, 1995)
  • Pages:
    312 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1823 kb
  • ePUB format
    1658 kb
  • DJVU format
    1356 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    511
  • Formats:
    mobi docx lrf txt


Shane White begins his book by asking what it meant to be black and living in the New York area as slavery ended . Most recent books that deal with the subject of slavery in New York quote this book extensively; you might as well read it for yourself.

Shane White begins his book by asking what it meant to be black and living in the New York area as slavery ended, but by the time he finishes, we have learned more about the demise of bondage in an economically changing city than about being African American. 11 people found this helpful.

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Somewhat More Independent book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Somewhat More Independent: The End Of Slavery In New York City, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

White explores, among many things, the demography of slavery . The New York that William Strickland observed in 1794 had already begun the dramatic growth that would soon make it the most important city in the United States.

White explores, among many things, the demography of slavery, the decline of the institution during and after the Revolution, racial attitudes, acculturation, and free blacks' "creative adaptation to an often hostile world. eISBN: 978-0-8203-4362-4.

Shane White creatively uses a remarkable array of primary sources-census data, tax lists, city directories, diaries .

Shane White creatively uses a remarkable array of primary sources-census data, tax lists, city directories, diaries, newspapers and magazines, and courtroom testimony-to reconstruct the content and context of the slave's world in New York and its environs during the revolutionary and early republic periods. White explores, among many things, the demography of slavery, the decline of the institution during and after the Revolution, racial attitudes, acculturation, and free blacks' "creative adaptation to an often hostile world. University of Georgia Press. ENG. Number of Pages.

Historically, the enslavement of African people in the United States began in New York as part of the Dutch slave trade. The Dutch West India Company imported 11 African slaves to New Amsterdam in 1626, with the first slave auction being held in New. The Dutch West India Company imported 11 African slaves to New Amsterdam in 1626, with the first slave auction being held in New Amsterdam in 1655. The last slaves were freed on July 4, 1827. Some younger black New Yorkers born to slave mothers continued to serve indentures into their 20s.

White’s exact, well-written, and modulated monograph is the finest study to date of an important subject. -"Journal of Interdisciplinary History". More books like Somewhat More Independent: The End of Slavery in New York City, 1770-1810 may be found by selecting the categories below: History, United States, State & Local, General

Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

the end of slavery in New York City, 1770-1810. Published 1991 by University ofGeorgia Press in Athens, Ga, London. History, Afro-Americans, Race relations, Slavery.

Somewhat More Independent: The End of Slavery in New York City, 1770-1810. Journal of the Early Republic.

A variety of source material such as census data, tax lists, city directories, diaries, newspapers and magazines, are used to reconstruct the content and context of the slave's world in New York and its environs during the revolutionary and early republic periods.