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Download The Petersburg Campaign: The Battle of the Crater "the Horrid Pit," June 25-August 6, 1864 (The Virginia Civil War Battles and Leaders Series) fb2

by Michael Arthur Cavanaugh
Download The Petersburg Campaign: The Battle of the Crater "the Horrid Pit," June 25-August 6, 1864 (The Virginia Civil War Battles and Leaders Series) fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Michael Arthur Cavanaugh
  • ISBN:
    0930919777
  • ISBN13:
    978-0930919771
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    H E Howard; 2nd edition (June 1, 1989)
  • Pages:
    183 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1400 kb
  • ePUB format
    1107 kb
  • DJVU format
    1361 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    271
  • Formats:
    azw doc txt mobi


The Petersburg Campaign book. Virginia Civil War Battles and Leaders). Other books in the series. Virginia Civil War Battles and Leaders (1 - 10 of 42 books). Books by Michael A. Cavanaugh.

The Petersburg Campaign book.

Bibliographic Details. Title: The Petersburg Campaign: The Battle of the. We are developing a specialization in golf books, and we have some general stock

Bibliographic Details. Publisher: Lynchburg, VA: . Black-and-white illustrations and maps. We are developing a specialization in golf books, and we have some general stock. As we are only gradually entering our books on the internet, want lists and inquiries pertaining to our areas of specialization are always welcome. Visit Seller's Storefront.

the Battle of the Crater, "the Horrid Pit," June 25-August 6, 1864.

book by William Marvel. Brand New Hardcover published by H. E. Howard, Lynchburg,VA. The Petersburg Campaign the Battle of the Crater, "the Horrid Pit," June 25-August 6, 1864. Part of the Virginia Civil War Battles and Leaders Series).

The Petersburg Campaign. The Virginia Civil War battles and leaders series. the Battle of the Crater "The Horrid Pit," June 25-August 6, 1864. 2nd ed. by Michael Arthur Cavanaugh. Includes bibliographical references (p. 149-164) and index. Spine title: The Battle of the Crater "The Horrid Pi. Series. Battle of the Crater "The Horrid Pi. Classifications. 183 p. : Number of pages.

The Petersburg Campaign, Deep Bottom, Globe Tavern, and Reams . That battle was a component of the whole project to destroy the Weldon RR. This contributed to my project to create a family history.

The Petersburg Campaign, Deep Bottom, Globe Tavern, and Reams Station August 14-25, 1864. 270 p. photos, maps, cloth. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

Battle of the Crater. American Civil War Petersburg Campaign: Union soldiers in trenchesUnion soldiers in trenches, Petersburg, Virginia, 1864. Library of Congress, Washington, . American Civil War Events. After his failure at the Battle of Cold Harbor (May 31–June 12), Union General Ulysses S. Grant sent his Army of the Potomac over the James River to attack Richmond from the south. He failed, however, to capture the important railhead at Petersburg. Confederate General Robert E. Lee rushed to strengthen its fortifications, forcing Grant to dig in for a siege.

The Battle of the Petersburg Crater, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War (Vol. 4, 829p). The Petersburg Campaign: June 1864–April 1865 (288p). Conshohocken, PA: Combined Books. McPherson, J. M. (1988)

The Battle of the Petersburg Crater, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War (Vol. No Quarter: The Battle of the Crater 1864 (413p). New York: Random House. Venable, M. W. (1926). (1988). Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (905p). New York: Ballantine Books. Nosworthy, B. (2003).

The Richmond–Petersburg campaign was a series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 15, 1864, to April 2, 1865, during the American Civil War. Although it is more popularly known as the siege of Petersburg, it was not a classic mi. . Although it is more popularly known as the siege of Petersburg, it was not a classic military siege, in which a city is usually surrounded and all supply lines are cut off, nor was it strictly limited to actions against Petersburg

Two weeks after Union forces arrived to invest the Confederate defenders of Petersburg, the battle lines of both sides had settled into a stalemate.

Two weeks after Union forces arrived to invest the Confederate defenders of Petersburg, the battle lines of both sides had settled into a stalemate. Since Cold Harbor, Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant was reluctant to mount a frontal attack against well-entrenched Confederates. By late June, Grant's lines covered most of the eastern approaches to Petersburg, but neither side seemed ready to risk an offensive move. Part of the Union line was held by Maj. Ambrose E. Burnside's Ninth Corps.

Brand New Hardcover published by H. E. Howard, Lynchburg,VA., 1989, 183 pages. Comes with a map of the battlefield (PLEASE SEE THE PHOTOS OF THIS BOOK THAT I POSTED ON THE PRODUCT PAGE). Blue boards with silver lettering, still has the Monument Museum Bookstore Price Sticker on the cover (SEE PHOTO). Prompt shipping with a Free Delivery Confirmation.

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I just finished rereading William Marvel’s and Mike Cavanaugh’s “The Battle of the Crater: The Horrid Pit.” It reads very well, with a lively style that moves along briskly. The book covers all the bases of the Crater affair, not all of them very deeply, but at least it mentions them. I would like to have seen more about the relationship between the Vicksburg mines and the Petersburg mine. IX Corps, which dug the Petersburg mine, had been present at Vicksburg at the time of the mine. How did Burnside determine that his troops must push outward from the Crater to clear the trenches on either side? Was that simply reasoning or was it based on the experience of the mine attacks at Vicksburg the previous year, where the advances bogged down as soldiers crowded into the craters and dug out buried foemen? And was there any communication at all on this subject between Grant and Burnside? I would also have liked to see more about First Deep Bottom and its relationship to the Crater. The authors appear to think that Grant planned rather than merely improvised a one-two punch, advancing first north of James River, and then, after drawing a significant number of enemy troops there, pushing forward to the south of the James. The only factual error of any significance I found was that a map has the Georgia Brigade of Mahone’s Division on the left of the Virginia Brigade, when the text (correctly) has the Georgia brigade on the right of the Virginia Brigade. I agree that Grant and Meade bear much of the responsibility for the Crater fiasco. The authors go a little easy on Burnside, though. The use of lots to select which of Burnside’s white divisions would lead the charge was foolish. His best division commander was Potter, Burnside knew or ought to have known it, and Potter’s division should have led the way. I’ll be reading some more recent and expansive books on the Crater and “The Horrid Pit” will furnish a standard for comparing them. This book remains an excellent introduction to the Crater disaster.
John Horn
Author, "The Siege of Petersburg: The Battles for the Weldon Railroad, August 1864"
_____, "The Petersburg Campaign"
Co-editor, "Civil War Talks: The Further Reminiscences of George S. Bernard and his Fellow Veterans"
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