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by Bryan Palmer
Download Canada's 1960s: The Ironies of Identity in a Rebellious Era fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Bryan Palmer
  • ISBN:
    080209659X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0802096593
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; First Edition edition (March 29, 2008)
  • Pages:
    480 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1895 kb
  • ePUB format
    1777 kb
  • DJVU format
    1360 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    987
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The irony of this rebellious era, however, was that while it promised so much in the way of change, it failed to provide a new understanding of Canadian national identity.

The irony of this rebellious era, however, was that while it promised so much in the way of change, it failed to provide a new understanding of Canadian national identity. Shedding Canada's British Past When we think of Canadian identity today and the major historical events and processes that helped to construct that identity, the 1960s usually registers only.

Canada's 1960s is a dazzling tour de force. It covers the emergence of the New Left, the upsurge of radical nationalist mobilizations in Quebec, the beginning of a new wave of feminism, and a discussion of how Native peoples became more visible with the birth of a militant Aboriginal movement of resistance.

Chapter One When the Buck Was Bad: The Dollar and Canadian Identity Entering the 1960s.

Published by: University of Toronto Press. Chapter One When the Buck Was Bad: The Dollar and Canadian Identity Entering the 1960s. Money makes the world go round. It was a thoughtful reflection by one of the country’s leading mainstream journalists. Fraser, a force atMaclean’sfrom the mid-1940s until his death in a canoeing accident in 1968, was known for his connections to politicians in power and officials in the Ottawa bureaucracy.

lt; Canada's 1960s is a big and academically ambitious book: 430 pages of text and 175 pages of endnotes and index. The first three chapters of Canada's 1960s are readable and frequently insightful as they run through the Diefenbaker era and Canada's transition from the British to the American geopolitical sphere.

Bryan D. Palmer demonstrates how after massive postwar immigration, new political movements, and at times violent protest, Canada could no longer be viewed in the old ways

Bryan D. Palmer demonstrates how after massive postwar immigration, new political movements, and at times violent protest, Canada could no longer be viewed in the old ways. National identity, long rooted in notions of Canada as a white settler Dominion of the North, marked profoundly by its origins as part of the British Empire, had become unsettled.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons rcial-NoDerivatives . International License. Any uses not covered by the license require permission from the rightsholder

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons rcial-NoDerivatives . Any uses not covered by the license require permission from the rightsholder. We ask that republication and reuse of content cite the original publication in Left History.

Rebellious youth, the Cold War, New Left radicalism, Pierre Trudeau, Red Power, Quebec's call for Revolution, Marshall McLuhan: these are just some of the major forces and figures that come to mind at the slightest mention of the 1960s in Canada.

The old Red Ensign no longer reflected Canada's place in the world, and Pearson believed a new flag . Download as PDF. Printable version.

The old Red Ensign no longer reflected Canada's place in the world, and Pearson believed a new flag would help unite French and English Canada with truly Canadian symbols. After lengthy debates over numerous designs, the current maple leaf flag was adopted in 1965 and was somewhat quickly embraced by the public. Canada's 1960s: the ironies of identity in a rebellious era, University of Toronto Press.

Canada’s 1960s: The Ironies of Identity in a Rebellious Era. Patrice Leclerc. Published: 30 May 2010. by University of Alberta Libraries. in Socialist Studies/Études Socialistes. Socialist Studies/Études Socialistes, Volume 6; doi:10. Keywords: Bryan D Palmer.

Rebellious youth, the Cold War, New Left radicalism, Pierre Trudeau, Red Power, Quebec's call for Revolution, Marshall McLuhan: these are just some of the major forces and figures that come to mind at the slightest mention of the 1960s in Canada. Focusing on the major movements and personalities of the time, as well as the lasting influence of the period, Canada's 1960s examines the legacy of this rebellious decade's impact on contemporary notions of Canadian identity. Bryan D. Palmer demonstrates how after massive postwar immigration, new political movements, and at times violent protest, Canada could no longer be viewed in the old ways. National identity, long rooted in notions of Canada as a white settler Dominion of the North, marked profoundly by its origins as part of the British Empire, had become unsettled.

Concerned with how Canadians entered the Sixties relatively secure in their national identities, Palmer explores the forces that contributed to the post-1970 uncertainty about what it is to be Canadian. Tracing the significance of dissent and upheaval among youth, trade unionists, university students, Native peoples, and Quebecois, Palmer shows how the Sixties ended the entrenched, nineteenth-century notions of Canada. The irony of this rebellious era, however, was that while it promised so much in the way of change, it failed to provide a new understanding of Canadian national identity.

A compelling and highly accessible work of interpretive history, Canada's 1960s is the book of the decade about an era many regard as the most turbulent and significant since the years of the Great Depression and World War II.