» » Tenting on the Plains: Or, General Custer in Kansas and Texas (The Western Frontier Library Series)

Download Tenting on the Plains: Or, General Custer in Kansas and Texas (The Western Frontier Library Series) fb2

by Elizabeth B. Custer,Shirley A. Leckie
Download Tenting on the Plains: Or, General Custer in Kansas and Texas (The Western Frontier Library Series) fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Elizabeth B. Custer,Shirley A. Leckie
  • ISBN:
    080612668X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0806126685
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Oklahoma Press; Abridged edition (October 15, 1994)
  • Pages:
    424 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1139 kb
  • ePUB format
    1205 kb
  • DJVU format
    1589 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    327
  • Formats:
    rtf doc lit mobi


Elizabeth Custer wrote Tenting on the Plains, or General .

Elizabeth Custer wrote Tenting on the Plains, or General Custer in Kansas and Texas during the 1880s. Were it not for Elizabeth Bacon Custer writing books of her late husband's war service, I wonder whether any of us would ever have learned that even the freed women slaves showed their gratitude by trying to help earn their freedom under the most harrowing conditions. Oh, and it also enjoyed reading how Elza once mistook Buffalo Bill Cody, in Kansas, for Geo. Armstrong Custer. Reading Tenting on the Plains, I honestly feel I am traveling back in time to listen to Libbie speak as we view what seems to be a silent, true-to-life video of late-1860s Kansas and Texas.

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. or. Download to your computer. Mac. Windows 8, 8 RT and Modern UI. Windows 8 desktop, Windows 7, XP & Vista. Read instantly in your browser.

Tenting on the Plains: With General Custer from the Potomac to the .

Tenting on the Plains: With General Custer from the Potomac to the Western Frontier. Left nearly Elizabeth Clift Bacon Custer was an American author and public speaker, and the wife of Brevet Major General George Armstrong Custer, United States Army.

It was previously published by other bona fide publishers, and is now, after many years, back in print.

Custer, Elizabeth Bacon, 1842-1933, Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876, United States. Army, Women - West (. Frontier and pioneer life - West (.

movies All Video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now! Occupy Wall Street TV NSA Clip Library. Custer, Elizabeth Bacon, 1842-1933, Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876, United States. Webster & Co. Collection.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project . Custer, Elizabeth Bacon, 1842-1933.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. movies All Video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now! Occupy Wall Street TV NSA Clip Library.

Elizabeth Bacon Custer

Elizabeth Bacon Custer. A work by Elizabeth Bacon Custer, devoted to her husband General George Armstrong Custer, outstanding Union cavalry commander during the American civil war, but remembered today for his role in the P. .In Tenting on the Plains (1887), Custer offers an evocative look at her experiences following General Custer in Kansas and Texas from 1865 to 1867. She describes cholera and other deceases, insects and scorpions of Texas, fire and flood of Kansas; racism, mule drivers and many other detailed of their experience. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

Tenting on the Plains: Or, General Custer in Kansas and Texas (The Western Frontier Library) (3 Volumes). by Elizabeth B. Custer.

More by 'Elizabeth B. Custer'. You may also be interested in these fine selections. And each purchased book makes a difference in someone's life through our literacy partner programs.

ed. by Elizabeth Bacon Custer. Published 1973 by Corner House Publishers in Williamstown, Mass. Elizabeth Bacon Custer (1842-1933), George A. Custer (1839-1876), George Armstrong Custer (1839-1876).

From the time of her husband’s death at the Battle of the Little Big Horn until her own death fifty-seven years later, at the age of ninety, Mrs. George Armstrong Custer devoted herself to defending or embellishing her husband’s reputation.

This account, the second in Elizabeth’s trilogy of her life with the General, focuses on the period immediately following the Civil War, when the Custers were stationed in Louisiana, Texas, and Kansas. She portrays the aftermath of the Civil War in Texas and life in Kansas while her husband took part in General Winfield Hancock’s 1867 expedition against the Indians between the Arkansas and Platte rivers. Throughout, she provides detailed descriptions of an army officer’s home life on the frontier during this major period of Indian unrest.

This edition, an abridgment of the original 1887 edition, with an Introduction by Jane R. Stewart and a Foreword by Shirley A. Leckie, brings together in a single volume one of the most significant documents of the Old West, here made accessible to a new generation of readers.


Raelin
Elizabeth Custer wrote 3 historical accounts concerning her husband's career after the Civil War. I purchased this one because I thought it would be interesting to hear a first-person account of military life in Kansas and Texas during the postbellum reconstruction period. And, Mrs. Custer does recount much of interest being a highly observant participant in Army life in those years. But, although obviously well educated, she just didn't have the knack for writing and it's a hard slog reading through her dense prose - an effort, but worth it. I would have given 3 or maybe even 4 stars for information content value. HOWEVER, this 'booklet' is an embarrassment to the publishing profession. There is no copywrite, no Library of Congress catalog info, and no indication of who the publisher might be. The font is microscopic, I suppose to save on the cost of paper (I had to purchase reading glasses). There is no table of contents, but then that wouldn't have helped much since there are no page numbers. Mrs. Custer did provide chapter titles, but these are merely embedded within one long continuous stream of unformatted text.
AND, this publication is available FOR FREE as an eBook at Project Gutenberg. Harper & Brothers (NEW YORK, 1895), the original publishers did a fine job including 25 illustrations (maps, scetches and photos, some rare). Gutenberg has preserved all that Harper & Brothers provided (including the illustrations) and they added value via careful editing and corrections. Plus they offer it in a variety of download formats including Kindle. So, don't be a chump like me and line the pockets of these dispicable public domain hucksters.
Faell
I love to read history. I especially love to read history book that are, themselves, so old that they also are part of history. What I mean is, I love to read books written at a time when folks were not quite so sophisticated that they parsed each word in order to offend nobody.

Elizabeth Custer wrote Tenting on the Plains, or General Custer in Kansas and Texas during the 1880s. Some say she devoted her life as a widow to writing books to show her late husband in a better light than was being accorded by other writers, and by his detractors.

Perhaps they are correct, but I am inclined to the opinion that Mrs Custer was merely writing history as she knew it to be from her vantage point.

More pertinent to this review, however, is her discussion of General Custer's maid during the Civil War and during the wars on the Plains. If the excerpt reprinted below does not entice you to find an antiquarian print version of this marvelous treasure, it should AT LEAST persuade you to download the free public domain Kindle version:

She describes her leaving the old plantation during war times: "I jined the Ginnel at Amosville, Rappahannock County, in August, 1863. Everybody was excited over freedom, and I wanted to see how it was. Everybody keeps asking me why I left. I can't see why they can't recollect what war was for, and what we was all bound to try and see for ourselves how it was. After the 'Mancipation, everybody was standin' up for liberty, and I wasent go in' to stay home when everybody else was a-goin'. The day I came into camp, there was a good many other darkeys from all about our place. We was a standin' round waitin' when I first seed the Ginnel.

"He and Captain Lyon cum up to me, and the Ginnel says, 'Well. What's your name!' I told him Eliza; and he says, lookin' me all over fust, 'Well, Eliza, would you like to cum and live with me?' I waited a Miss Libbie. I looked HIM all over, too, and finally I sez, 'I reckon I would.' So the bargain was fixed up, but, oh, how awful lonesome I was at fust, and I was afraid of everything in the shape of war. I used to wish myself back on the old plantation with mother. I was mighty glad when you cum, Miss Libbie. Why, sometimes I never sot eyes on a woman for weeks at a time."

I would excerpt more, but, to save space will only note the Libbie further explained how courageous she found George A, Custer's maid, Eliza, by cooking a meal for Custer, but having to move, restart a fire because of nearly getting struck by a cannonball!

I mean, really, can any among us today imagine such a feat?

Libbie goes on to report that Eliza did so, because she felt it her duty because her freedom came from those risking their lives for her freedom.

Were it not for Elizabeth Bacon Custer writing books of her late husband's war service, I wonder whether any of us would ever have learned that even the freed women slaves showed their gratitude by trying to help earn their freedom under the most harrowing conditions.

Oh, and it also enjoyed reading how Elza once mistook Buffalo Bill Cody, in Kansas, for Geo. Armstrong Custer.

Reading Tenting on the Plains, I honestly feel I am traveling back in time to listen to Libbie speak as we view what seems to be a silent, true-to-life video of late-1860s Kansas and Texas.

I am convinced there was the sort of mutual love and devotion among the Custer brothers Tom and George, Libbie, Eliza, Wild Bill Hickok, and Buffalo Bill that no modern novel replicates.

In other words, invest some of your time, if not money, in a thoroughly delightful reading of Tenting on the Plains by Elizabeth Bacon Custer.
MarF
Elizabeth Custer has always been noted for her devotion to her husband and her marriage. It is well-known historically how the Grant administration simply ignored the death of Custer and his men, because Grant was angry at Custer for having testified against the corrupt politicians cheating the Indians of food and other necessities. The fact that one of those men was Grant's own brother made him viciously angry at such testimony, though everything the General said was true. Thus when Custer died, Grant did not see to it that Elizabeth was provided with the regular pension of a General's wife, $50 monthly, but let her survive for years on just $30 monthly. One of the ways she tried to support herself under this mistreatment was to write about her life with Custer in the Seventh Cavalry. This book is expertly written by a lady of her times, and gives a fine, clear picture of the life she led on the arid plains with her husband whom she obviously idolizes. It is as good now as it was a hundred years ago.
Hǻrley Quinn
so far I am loving this book. I love all the books written by people who actually knew and lived with Autie and this is one of them. Nicely done. An adventure for sure.
One thing I am learning as I am reading all these first edition books written by people who knew Custer, is that they loved him. They liked him. He was so much more than I have ever heard before. He was an incredible man and it has been my pleasure to get to know him and his era.
The other thing I am appreciating in reading these books is the adventure. These people lived. They really lived. They didn't spend their lives in amusement ( a without muse thinking) without thinking as we are prone to do these days with amusement parks, movies, laptops, ipods, iphones and every other thing to spend our time and our lives with ~ and we miss the adventure of really living.