» » Heartland Serial Killers: Belle Gunness, Johann Hoch, and Murder for Profit in Gaslight Era Chicago

Download Heartland Serial Killers: Belle Gunness, Johann Hoch, and Murder for Profit in Gaslight Era Chicago fb2

by Richard C. Lindberg
Download Heartland Serial Killers: Belle Gunness, Johann Hoch, and Murder for Profit in Gaslight Era Chicago fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Richard C. Lindberg
  • ISBN:
    0875804365
  • ISBN13:
    978-0875804361
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Northern Illinois University Press; 1 edition (April 25, 2011)
  • Pages:
    272 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1293 kb
  • ePUB format
    1506 kb
  • DJVU format
    1964 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    923
  • Formats:
    rtf mbr azw mobi


Heartland Serial Killers book. Unlike Hoch, Belle Gunness, likely the most prolific and infamous female serial killer of the 20th century, has remained fascinating to the public.

Heartland Serial Killers book. Here, Lindberg presents the most comprehensive and compelling study of the Gunness case to date, including new information regarding ongoing DNA testing of remains found at the site of Gunness’s farm in LaPorte, Indiana, which may serve to resolve once and for all the mystery surrounding Gunness’s death.

But, in Heartland Serial Killers, Lindberg brings back vividly the horrors of. .Johann Hoch was a debonair bigamist and wife killer who boasted of having.

But, in Heartland Serial Killers, Lindberg brings back vividly the horrors of one of Chicago's first celebrity criminals and uncovers new evidence of a close connection between Hoch and . Holmes, the Devil in the White City. Lindberg, an accomplished local historian and true crime writer, presents a fascinating story of two contemporaneous serial killers, both weaving marriage and murder in and around Chicago during the 1890s and 1900s.

But, in Heartland Serial Killers, Lindberg brings back vividly the horrors of one of Chicago’s first celebrity criminals .

But, in Heartland Serial Killers, Lindberg brings back vividly the horrors of one of Chicago’s first celebrity criminals and uncovers new evidence of a close connection between Hoch and .

Heartland Serial Killers. Belle Gunness, Johann Hoch, and Murder for Profit in Gaslight Era Chicago. Johann Hoch was a debonair bigamist and wife killer who boasted of having perfected a scientific technique to romance and seduction. By: Richard Lindberg. Belle Gunness was a nesting Black Widow whose sprawling farm in Northwest Indiana was a fatal lure for lonely bachelors seeking the comforts of middle-age security by answering matrimonial advertisements placed by Gunness. Notorious in his own day, Hoch had faded into the dark background of Chicago crime history.

The Mistress of Murder Hill: The Serial Killings of Belle Gunness by Sylvia Elizabeth Shepherd (meggyweg). This book might as well have mentioned . Holmes in the title too, since there's substantial coverage of his life and crimes in the story

The Mistress of Murder Hill: The Serial Killings of Belle Gunness by Sylvia Elizabeth Shepherd (meggyweg). 0 0. The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America by Erik Larson (meggyweg). Holmes in the title too, since there's substantial coverage of his life and crimes in the story. I'm actually a bit troubled by what Mr. Lindberg has to say about Holmes, since a lot of it contradicts what I've read in the other two books I've read about him, Devil in the White City and Depraved. Is Lindberg making much out of nothing? Is he inaccurate or were the other authors wrong?

book by Richard C. Lindberg.

20 lbs. Dimensions:9. Age Range:22 years and up. Grade Range:Postsecondary and higher.

A female serial killer named Belle Gunness slauing men and even her .

A female serial killer named Belle Gunness slauing men and even her ow. rue crime books, audio books and feature eBooks from WildBlue Press - bringing you the work of some of the best true crime writers in the business. Female serial killer Belle Sorenson Gunness - killed not only her children, husband but many other men for money. Lindberg, an accomplished local historian and true crime writer, presents a fascinating story of two contemporaneous serial killers, both weaving marriage and murder in and around Chicago during the 1. Tina Eger.

Richard Lindberg is a Chicago historian, book author, and journalist chronicling Windy City crime, politics .

Richard Lindberg is a Chicago historian, book author, and journalist chronicling Windy City crime, politics, sports, and history for the past 30 years. A book profiling Gunness and Hoch, two early 20th Century serial killers who placed advertisements in the lonely hearts columns of ethnic newspapers advertising for desperately lonely men and women to marr. windl. nd ultimately murder, was published in the Spring of 2011 by Northern Illinois University Press in DeKalb, IL. Belle Gunness carried out her bloody work in a rural farm house outside of LaPorte, Indiana from 1900-1908.

In the pantheon of serial killers, Belle Gunness stands alone. Richard C. Lindberg, Heartland Serial Killers: Belle Gunness, Johann Hoch, and Murder for Profit in Gaslight Era Chicago, 2011, Northern Illinois University Press. She was the rarest of female psychopaths, a woman who engaged in wholesale slaughter, partly out of greed but mostly for the sheer joy of it. Between 1902 and 1908, she lured a succession of unsuspecting victims to her Indiana murder farm. Some were hired hands. Self-Published: Jack Rosewood, Belle Gunness: The True Story of The Slaying Mother: Historical Serial Killers and Murderers, 2016, CreateSpace Independent Publishing.

Lindberg, an accomplished local historian and true crime writer, presents a fascinating story of two contemporaneous serial killers, both weaving marriage and murder in and around Chicago during the 1890s and 1900s. Johann Hoch was a debonair bigamist and wife killer who boasted of having perfected a “scientific technique” to romance and seduction. Belle Gunness was a nesting “Black Widow” whose sprawling farm in Northwest Indiana was a fatal lure for lonely bachelors seeking the comforts of middle-age security by answering matrimonial advertisements placed by Gunness.

Notorious in his own day, Hoch had faded into the dark background of Chicago crime history. But, in Heartland Serial Killers, Lindberg brings back vividly the horrors of one of Chicago’s first celebrity criminals and uncovers new evidence of a close connection between Hoch and H.H. Holmes, the “Devil in the White City.”

Unlike Hoch, Belle Gunness, likely the most prolific and infamous female serial killer of the 20th century, has remained fascinating to the public. Here, Lindberg presents the most comprehensive and compelling study of the Gunness case to date, including new information regarding ongoing DNA testing of remains found at the site of Gunness’s farm in LaPorte, Indiana, which may serve to resolve once and for all the mystery surrounding Gunness’s death.

Told in alternating chapters and rapidly paced, this book is true crime at its best—gripping, pulpy, and full of sharp historical tidbits. True crime fans, history buffs, and those interested in local lore will delight in this chilling tale of two ruthless killers.


Fek
Heartland Serial Killers offers an intriguing narrative of two infamous serial-murderers during the turn of the twentieth century in and around Chicago. This is a good read for the general reader interested in the true crime genre because its narrative is gripping and the reading is light. It's also a good starting point for anyone looking to research more about Johann Hoch or Belle Gunness. A slight word of caution to researchers: you won't find anything in the way of new analysis on Hoch or Gunness. Additionally, the author doesn't always cite where he got his sources in places. This severely effects his credibility, and makes one wonder whether his sources are indeed accurate. This was my key disappointment with the book. I thought since a historian wrote this book it would have some innovative historical analysis, but there was none. The interpretation that Gunness could be "considered by some to be an early feminist, running her farm and her business in a harsh, unyielding physical environment and doing the punishing man's work" (pp 219) is a bit of a stretch. Actually it's more than a stretch, it's absurd to anyone who has had a women's history course. Throughout history women have worked on farms, doing physical work, but this would've hardly labeled them "feminists."
Winail
Brilliant, well researched, a little opinionated, but not bad. Worth reading
Uafrmaine
Famed Chicago historian Richard C. Lindberg has excavated the long-buried stories of Belle Gunness and Johann Hoch, two serial killers who preyed on the lovelorn during the closing years of the nineteenth century and the dawn of the twentieth. It's a darkly fascinating look at a ruthless pair who profited from their respective marriage-murder sprees until the law caught up with one and fire destroyed the other... maybe.

Belle Gunness was a homely middle-aged widow whose Northwest Indiana farm included an unmarked graveyard for all her slain suitors. From 1900-1908 she lured well-to-do men to her home, promising love and material comfort and delivering a horrific death instead. She is arguably the most prolific female serial killer of her era, and Lindberg enlivens her story with details about recent DNA testing of human remains found on the old Gunness farm site in LaPorte. When a fire destroyed the place in 1908, apparently killing the murderess along with her children, some investigators were convinced that the adult female skeleton found was not Belle's. The authorities had been closing in on her, alerted by the suspicious relatives of her victims, and many believed that she'd murdered a homeless woman to aid in her escape. The mystery isn't solved yet, but this modern postscript suggests that one day it may be.

Johann Hoch's legend is not as well remembered, but no less intriguing. A squat, balding man who somehow appealed to women, Hoch spent some time as an apprentice to serial killer H.H. Holmes (a fact that Lindberg's masterful research has brought to light), whose Englewood "murder castle" claimed dozens of lives. Hoch married thirty-five women for their money and assets and killed at least ten of them. Forensic science proved his undoing: one of his victims, Marie Walcker, had arsenic in her system, and when the mortician proved that the poison had not been a component of the embalming fluid, Hoch was charged with murder. He was convicted after a sensational trial and hanged in 1906.

Lindberg documents the murder for profit sprees of Gunness and Hoch in alternating chapters, and in a gritty, intense style that makes the events he describes as chilling today as they were at the time of their discovery. "Heartland Serial Killers" will appeal to True Crime fans, lovers of Chicago history, and anyone who enjoys a literary foray into the underworld of human nature.
Jerinovir
This book might as well have mentioned H.H. Holmes in the title too, since there's substantial coverage of his life and crimes in the story. I'm actually a bit troubled by what Mr. Lindberg has to say about Holmes, since a lot of it contradicts what I've read in the other two books I've read about him, The Devil in the White City and Depraved. Is Lindberg making much out of nothing? Is he inaccurate or were the other authors wrong? Contradicting sources always bother me.

Regards Hoch and Gunness, their stories are decently enough told, and as far as I know this is the only modern full-length book about the undeservedly obscure Hoch. It's got value for that all by itself. But I wish Lindberg had put in more about the "is the burned decapitated corpse really Belle Gunness" controversy, and perhaps his own opinion.
Urreur
GREAT
Kabandis
I came across the story of Belle Gunness on Wikipedia one slow day at work and became momentarily obsessed with the gruesome things I read about her. I wanted to know more, so I searched for books on the topic. This book is my first foray into the genre of true crime, and I was disappointed by the lack of pacing and general lack of narrative in the book. Then again, though, it might be hard to create an entertaining narrative about two killers that did terrible things such a long time ago. There are many details in here, and it's clearly well researched - hence the three stars... But if you're looking for a page turner that gets into the psyche of these two killers and tells a suspenseful story, you won't find it. There is much more emphasis on the effort to track down the killers (not the most interesting side to these stories!) than on their deeds. You learn about the newspaper business in Chicago and the local politics of LaPorte, but the stories of Hoch and Gunness actually begin to feel repetitive and unsurprising about two-thirds of the way through the book.