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by Charles A. Moose
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Americas
  • Author:
    Charles A. Moose
  • ISBN:
    0525947779
  • ISBN13:
    978-0525947776
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Dutton Adult; First Edition edition (September 15, 2003)
  • Pages:
    336 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1551 kb
  • ePUB format
    1396 kb
  • DJVU format
    1247 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    280
  • Formats:
    lrf lit docx mbr


During the first three weeks of October 2002, 14 random people were gunned down in the suburbs outside Washington, . setting off the largest manhunt in American history. Through it all, Montgomery County Police Chief Moose was the face America watched

During the first three weeks of October 2002, 14 random people were gunned down in the suburbs outside Washington, . Through it all, Montgomery County Police Chief Moose was the face America watched. He was comfortingly there, on television, before people went to work in the morning and when they got home at night.

Three Weeks in October book. As Montgomery County Police Chief, Charles Moose notes this, and rues the cheapness of modern life, another call comes in - a man has been shot dead mowing a lawn; half an hour later Wednesday evening 2nd October 2002, a man is suddenly shot dead in a parking lot in Maryland, Washington . There are no witnesses. The killing fails to make the following morning's papers.

Three Weeks in October follows Charles Moose’s efforts to crack a. .

Three Weeks in October follows Charles Moose’s efforts to crack a seemingly unsolvable case. As a stunned nation watched, Chief Moose stood tall in the face of horrific events-a courageous presence whose tenacity brought snipers John Allen Muhammed and Lee Boyd Malvo to justice. In this New York Times bestselling book, the police chief who led one of the most suspenseful manhunts in American history takes readers behind the headlines into the notorious . sniper case that held the nation spellbound. In October 2002, ordinary Americans feared for their lives, too frightened to pump gas at the local station or let their children play outside.

In October 2002 ordinary Americans feared for their lives, too frightened to pump gas . This book follows Charles Moose's efforts to crack a seemingly unsolvable case

In October 2002 ordinary Americans feared for their lives, too frightened to pump gas at the local station or let their children play outside. For 23 days, a series of random sniper killings terrorized the Washington, . area and launched the largest manhunt in American history. This book follows Charles Moose's efforts to crack a seemingly unsolvable case. As a stunned nation watched, Chief Moose stood tall in the face of horrific events, a courageous presence whose tenacity brought snipers John Allen Muhammed and Lee Boyd Malvo to justice.

Three Weeks in October. The Manhunt for the Serial Sniper. By Charles A. Moose and Charles Fleming. About Three Weeks in October

Three Weeks in October. Category: Biography & Memoir. About Three Weeks in October. I thought this book was completely interesting, both from the viewpoint of Chief Moose's life in Law Enforcement and his role in the sniper investigation. I could not put it down, and feel he is a real hero. But this is also the inspirational story of Moose’s rise from a young African American cop battling prejudice to a respected chief of police-who couldn’t stop until he captured two of the most bizarre killers America has ever known.

Charles Alexander Moose (born 1953) is an American author and former police officer. He is best known for his role as being the primary official in charge of the efforts to apprehend the . snipers in October 2002. During his law enforcement career, Moose served as the chief of police for Montgomery County, Maryland, and Portland, Oregon.

Author: Charles A. Moose, Charles Fleming ISBN 10: 0752861069. Will be clean, not soiled or stained. Additional Product Features. Charles Fleming, Charles A. Moose. Place of Publication. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 11 pre-owned listings.

The Montgomery County police chief at the head of the recent manhunt for the serial snipers who shot random victims during a three-week period between Maryland and Virginia recounts the tense days and nights of his team's investigation and the massive efforts by law enforcement and civilians that ultimately led to the snipers' capture. 100,000 first printing.

FireWater
This book gives insight into Chief Moose's character and details on a frightening time for Montgomery County residents. He seems to be writing to be easily read by just about anybody, but that's at the expense of a more nuanced look behind the scenes. I could have done without the defensiveness at the end of the book, too, because most of us remember our fear of the snipers and the weeks they ran amok much more than the criticism Chief Moose got afterwards. What should have been said instead is how law enforcement, in a future case like this, could try to avoid the blinders that hampered the police from the beginning of the investigation, making all of us waste our focus on white trucks and twenty-something white loners.
Uthergo
A lot of other people are saying that this book is terrible and keeps repeating itself. However, I am currently writing a term paper about the Beltway sniper attacks and this book is my number one primary peer reviewed source. It has all the information about the investigation and lists everything I need to know. It is more than what was reported to the media if you read about a quarter into the book you find out that nothing in the investigation was told to the media until the correct times. If you want to leisurly read about the Beltway Sniper attacks then go find yourself a book by some author who doesnt really know anything. This is the lead investigator in charge of the task force to hunt for these guys. If you don't see the immense amount of information then you shouldn't be reading this. Everybody that says its boring, go find yourself a true document that is interesting. This is the real world, these are the true facts, and they are boring as hell but true. Sorry for the rant, but I thought this book would be terrible because of the reviews but give it a chance if you want the truth.
luisRED
Terrible events but a great book
MegaStar
The experiences of the Virginia and Maryland communities during those "Three Weeks in October" kept much of the country riveted to their televisions, as we watched in horror while the tragic story unfolded. It was as much a documentary on how the news media handles such events, as on the tools and techniques of today's law enforcement communities. In 1999, in "Triumph of Spirit: An Autobiography by Chief Penny E. Harrington," Chief Moose wrote in the foreword: "As we approach the twenty-first century, Americans are still seeking a way to develop a working relationship with the police in their communities. Americans clearly benefit from a police agency that reflects the community - a police agency that looks, feels, and thinks the way it does - a police agency designed to reflect the community in regard to demographics, ethics, and values." Many police agencies around the country have adopted effective community policing programs - and those communities have greatly benefited from that effort. The Portland, Oregon episodes described briefly by Moose in "Three Weeks in October" are discussed in great detail in Harrington's book. I would encourage readers with an interest in learning more about law enforcement diversity, and the often-delicate relationship between communities, their police agencies-and the media, to read her book. It sheds much light on many of the topics touched upon by Chief Moose and provides great perspective about the issues of law enforcement, diversity, the media - and the often-ensuing conflict between the three. (From: Marion E. Gold, author of "Top Cops: Profiles of Women in Command.")
Kashicage
I worked with Charles Moose in Portland and know him to be an honest, dedicated professional man, loyal to his friends. This book is a brutally honest portrayal of the man and his beliefs. At a time when the entire nation was focused on his actions, he made us all proud of his professionalism and his humanity. The book is a bit disjointed because it skips back and forth between Portland and Montgomery County. It would have been better to have it chronologically. However, the information about his early life and his climb to the level of chief and then the sniper situation does give a complete picture of this dedicated law enforcement professional.
(Charles Moose wrote the introduction to my autobiography, Triumph of Spirit, available on Amazon.com)
Tygokasa
I found this book riveting, educational, and inspirational. Anyone who focuses on the writing style can't see the forest for the trees. The autobiographical chapters are as irresistible as the manhunt. It's unfortunate that Chief Moose had to choose between his job and the book, but given the compelling aspects of the book, I'm personally glad he made the choice he did.
Anararius
I haven't finished his book yet but so far it reminds me of Rick Bragg's "All Over But the Shoutin" and Lisa Beamer's "Let's Roll". Everybody has their own story to tell. Reception and perception depends on the reader's mind set. CHEERS to Charles Moose for telling his story.