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by Al Sullivan
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Americas
  • Author:
    Al Sullivan
  • ISBN:
    0813529506
  • ISBN13:
    978-0813529509
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Rutgers University Press; None edition (July 15, 2001)
  • Pages:
    264 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1578 kb
  • ePUB format
    1654 kb
  • DJVU format
    1283 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    461
  • Formats:
    rtf txt azw mbr


Or biomedical engineer Lois Ross, who twice a year leads a group of volunteers to clean up a local pond.

David Suzuki and co-author Holly Dressel have put together a series of examples of good environmental stewardship going on all over the world for a refreshing break from the usual enviro bad news we are constantly being pelted with.

Through richly detailed stories - a kind of writing that has all but disappeared from our local newspapers - about small-town people in extraordinary situations, Sullivan depicts the characters that enliven life in the Garden State.

Stanford Everyday People, popularly known as EP, is Stanford University's only Hip-Hop, R&B, Motown and Soul a cappella group. The group is known for its tight, soulful sound and wearing all black. It was founded in 1987 and has released ten studio albums to date. EP has toured the United States, Jamaica and the Bahamas

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. No need to use torrent or IRC.

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. Part of "Chronicles of The One" series by Nora Roberts. It began on New Year's Eve. The sickness came on suddenly, and spread quickly.

Электронная книга "Pleased to Meet Me: Genes, Germs, and the Curious Forces That Make Us Who We Are", Bill Sullivan. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Pleased to Meet Me: Genes, Germs, and the Curious Forces That Make Us Who We Are" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The bouquet was amazing and the flowers were very carefully and elegantly assembled. Thanks a lot Garden State. Bad Service at all, there is no respect for the customer.

Copping their name from Sly & the Family Stone and their funk formula from Kool & the Gang, what set the Everyday People apart is the sheer virtuosity of its performances - each track on I Like What I Like is tighter than a vise grip, complete with vibrant arrangements and a genuine esprit de corps that transcends the obvious and often pedestrian material.

Louis Sullivan was a pioneering architect who is known as the 'father of skyscrapers' and 'father of. .Sullivan adapted by creating high-rises very different from the ones that were being constructed along historical styles

Louis Sullivan was a pioneering architect who is known as the 'father of skyscrapers' and 'father of modernism'. This biography profiles his childhood, career, life, works, achievements & timeline. Birthday: September 3, 1856. Sullivan adapted by creating high-rises very different from the ones that were being constructed along historical styles. He believed in the Roman architect, Marcus Vitruvius Pollio’s credo "form ever follows function", stressing on use rather than utility.

In this time of ever-shorter news stories telling us everything that’s wrong with the world, it’s a nice change of pace to read about someone like Felix Addeo, who takes time out of his busy schedule to teach middle school kids what it’s like to be an accountant. Or biomedical engineer Lois Ross, who twice a year leads a group of volunteers to clean up a local pond. These are just two of the ordinary, yet extraordinary, people profiled in this collection of feature articles by New Jersey reporter Al Sullivan. Through richly detailed stories—a kind of writing that has all but disappeared from our local newspapers—about small-town people in extraordinary situations, Sullivan depicts the characters that enliven life in the Garden State. While his stories always have a strongly local feel, each contains an element of the universal that draws in readers whose interest lies not in a specific location, but in the diverse experiences and stories of people who live in and shape a community.

Sullivan has written about people from nearly every walk of life, from minister to prostitute, from jail warden to undercover cop. Everyday People takes readers to the funeral of AIDS activist Ronald West, Jr., and to the office of James Delson, owner and operator of Jersey City’s Toy Soldier Company. You’ll follow Sullivan from the Hoboken workshop of violin maker Jon Van Kouwenhoven to the rooftops that are the “office” of chimney sweep Ron Simpson. You’ll go on a ride with the Glen Ridge Volunteer Ambulance Squad and along the Hackensack River with Captain Bill Sheehan, founder of the Hackensack Estuary and River Tender’s Corporation, which monitors the river’s ecology.You don’t have to live in New Jersey to recognize the people in Sullivan’s stories. They are the librarians and tax assessors, attorneys and hotdog vendors, firefighters and bee keepers, poets and politicians, that make every American town special. In Everyday People, Sullivan records their stories for us all to read and remember.


Mave
If you ever met Al Sullivan, the last thing you'd do is picture him as a dashing young soldier long ago at the height of the Vietnam war - much less baby sitting a bunch of freaky rockers outside his helicopter at a place called Woodstock. Yet, that's one of the duties he 'volunteered' for.
In his essay "By The Time I Got To Woodstock" Sullivan briefly notes his 1st visit to the upstate refuge - and his overwhelming fear of helicopters. It is one of the rare times in Everyday People that he uses "I". It's to be forgiven him because he immediately uses his modern day visit to Woodstock as a newspeg to compare that town with Secaucus - his current tour of duty.
Sullivan worked for me for a few months in 96-97, and though the months were few, the impact has been long-lasting. He covered the mundane meetings, sure, but there was always something else lurking behind the touseld hair and the distant stare. He had the ragtag Tandy laptop blinking on one desk, the company terminal blinking there, a notepad in front of him - all while he was on the phone talking to another source. Sullivan was always on the go, always three steps ahead of the sunshine, so to speak. It is a pleasure to read him again.
It was there, in those other stories that Al set himself apart. If he workd for me now, he'd be a 'special writer' - that's someone who does his beat, and also turns in outstanding stories from left field, Clark's Pond, the emergency room and just about anywhere else fate takes him.
"Down and Out in Hoboken" relays the chance meeting with a panhandler at St. Mary's Hospital. The panhandler - whose name Sullivan never learns - says "People give me money to make me go away..." And in just a couple hundred words, you learn an awful lot about the panhandler - and the skill of Sullivan's perception of people. That's what makes Everyday People in its gritty realism a pure reading pleasure.
Perhaps the editors of Everyday People could have selected a few longer profiles, but as Sullivan notes in his Preface, "the word count has always been my curse," and I'll vouch for his observation here, "as it is for all prolific journalists," and again I agree. While we await the next volume, dig in here, and meet some interesting everyday people.
adventure time
I enjoy reading about real people, but am having a hard time with this book because of the samll type. For this reason, I have not read very many stories. I have impaired vision and need to use a magnifyer to read this particular book, which takes away some of the enjoyment. I do enjoy this author's writings very much, and encourage him to choose larger type in the future, as I want to read more of his books.
Arakus
This review is long overdue. I picked up Al's book almost a year ago at a local book sale. I'm not a big reader, but having met Al in person led me to buy the book. I began skimming the book later on that night. Eventually, I stopped skimming and began reading. The profiles in this book are interesting. Yes, these are 'everyday people', but Al's insightful writing sheds electricity onto their lives. It was really like a breath of fresh air to read about the lives ordinary people lead. It's not everyday, in this fast-paced world of ours, when you take the time out to sit down and learn about the strangers who come and go. I highly recommend this pleasurable read.
Vosho
I am the author of this book
When I put together the pieces for this book, I wanted to share with readers the sight and sounds of those people I interviewed. Each person, each story is special to me because they seem to capture the person as I felt. Each person I talked to seemed to want to share their secret lives with me. It was fun.