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by Jacqueline L. Tobin,Hettie Jones
Download From Midnight to Dawn: The Last Tracks of the Underground Railroad fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Jacqueline L. Tobin,Hettie Jones
  • ISBN:
    038551431X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0385514316
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Doubleday; 1st Edition edition (January 16, 2007)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1989 kb
  • ePUB format
    1266 kb
  • DJVU format
    1475 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    992
  • Formats:
    lrf txt rtf mbr


Tobin tells the story of the journey of slaves from Midnight to Dawn as they traveled to freedom in Canada and .

Tobin tells the story of the journey of slaves from Midnight to Dawn as they traveled to freedom in Canada and established settlements with churches, schools, businesses, farms, and factories to sustain themselves. Settlements by black freedmen date from as early as the Revolutionary War, when slaves joined the British in return for freedom.

Jacqueline L. Tobin, Hettie Jones. The Underground Railroad was the passage to freedom for many slaves, but it was rife with dangers

Jacqueline L. The Underground Railroad was the passage to freedom for many slaves, but it was rife with dangers. From Midnight to Dawn evokes the turmoil and controversies of the time, reveals the compelling stories behind events such as Harpers Ferry and the Christian Resistance, and introduces the reader to the real–life Uncle Tom who influenced Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

by Jacqueline L. Tobin First published January 16th 2007.

From Midnight to Dawn presents compelling portraits of the men and women who established the Underground Railroad and traveled it to find new lives in Canada

From Midnight to Dawn presents compelling portraits of the men and women who established the Underground Railroad and traveled it to find new lives in Canada. Evoking the turmoil and controversies of the time, Tobin illuminates the historic events that forever connected American and Canadian history by giving us the true stories behind well-known figures such as Harriet Tubman and John Brown

The Underground Railroad was the passage to freedom for many slaves, but it. .She lives in Denver, Colorado.

The Underground Railroad was the passage to freedom for many slaves, but it was rife with dangers. There were dedicated conductors and safe houses, but also arduous nights in the mountains and days in threatening towns. In prose rich in detail and imagery, From Midnight to Dawn presents compelling portraits of the men and women who established the Railroad, and of the people who traveled it to find new lives in Canada. Some of the figures are well known, like Harriet Tubman and John Brown. HETTIE JONES is a poet and author of the memoir How I Became Hettie Jones and coauthor with Rita Marley of No Woman No Cry.

From Midnight to Dawn: The Last Tracks of the Underground Railroad. Written by Jacqueline L. Tobin and Hettie Jones. Narrated by Richard Allen. While there were dedicated conductors and safe houses, there were also arduous nights in the mountains and days in threatening towns. For those who made it to Midnight, the code name given to Detroit, the Detroit River became their Jordan

From Midnight to Dawn : The Last Tracks of the Underground Railroad. From Midnight to Dawn. com User, September 1, 2008. An excellent book about the little-publicized black settlements in southeastern Ontario, before the Civil War, along with bios

From Midnight to Dawn : The Last Tracks of the Underground Railroad. by Jacqueline L. Tobin. An excellent book about the little-publicized black settlements in southeastern Ontario, before the Civil War, along with bios. A must for anyone interested in the Underground Railroad. com User, March 18, 2008.

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From midnight to dawn. The Last Tracks of the Underground Railroad. Tobin with Hettie Jones. than 30,000 who fled slavery before the Civil War. (Most returned afterwards. If no book jacket appears in a few seconds, then we don't have an excerpt of this book or your browser is unable to display it). Membership Advantages.

This extraordinary narrative offers a fresh perspective on the Underground Railroad as it traces the perilous journeys of fugitive ex–slaves from the United States to free black settlements in Canada. The Underground Railroad was the passage to freedom for many slaves, but it was rife with dangers. There were dedicated conductors and safe houses, but also arduous nights in the mountains and days in threatening towns. For those who made it to Midnight (the code name given to Detroit), the Detroit River became a River Jordan—and Canada became their land of Canaan, the Promised Land where they could live freely in black settlements under the protection of British law. One of these settlements was known as Dawn.In prose rich in detail and imagery, From Midnight to Dawn presents compelling portraits of the men and women who established the Railroad, and of the people who traveled it to find new lives in Canada. Some of the figures are well known, like Harriet Tubman and John Brown. But there are equally heroic, less familiar figures here as well, like Mary Ann Shadd, who became the first black female newspaper editor in North America, and Osborne Perry Anderson, the only black survivor of the fighting at Harpers Ferry. From Midnight to Dawn evokes the turmoil and controversies of the time, reveals the compelling stories behind events such as Harpers Ferry and the Christian Resistance, and introduces the reader to the real–life “Uncle Tom” who influenced Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Toms Cabin.An extraordinary examination of a part of American history that transcends national borders, From Midnight to Dawn will captivate readers with its tales of hope, courage, and a people’s determination to live equal under the law.

Zeks Horde
I thought I knew about the underground railway, Sojourner Truth helping escaped slaves across the river to freedom. My view was so unrealistic after reading the book I know now the dangers of the slaves making their run to freedom. Even though Sojourner Truth did play an important part in the railway it was much larger and broader than I thought. This book helps me to understand the bravery and the stamina of the people who took the chance to make a run for freedom. Also those who helped them along the way, and the fairness of the Canadian Government which was all the slaves wanted and needed. Even though I'm reading the book electronically I still can see the pictures of the people and leaders in this drama. I think this should be a book of required reading because it shows the number of heros both Black and white that helped to fight for the black mans freedom.
Nten
A great book for anyone who wants to know more about the final stage of the underground railroad.
Grinin
Learned so much history.
Fast Lovebird
An excellent book about the little-publicized black settlements in southeastern Ontario, before the Civil War, along with bios. A must for anyone interested in the Underground Railroad.
Winotterin
Great book. Was just what I needed for a class I was takeing. I look forward to reading more books from this author.
Ariurin
It was a gift for a friend.
Fato
This is an excellent book about the Underground Railroad , something that I am very interested in. The condition of the book was perfect and the service was excellent.
Thanks so much for being a seller that I would purchase from again in a minute.
Elaine, N.Y.
Few people pursue the research level of Jacqueline L. Tobin in traveling, reading old papers, sifting through letters, discovering ancient pamphlets, and interviewing descendents. The information in From Midnight to Dawn is inestimable, and Tobin's description of the black journey from Midnight, Detroit's nickname, to the black Ontario settlement of Dawn is gripping.

Few Americans realize that the Underground Railroad's terminus was in Canada. Many believe it ran from the Deep South to Ohio and dispersed into thin air, leaving Uncle Tom's Cabin behind in Kentucky.

Tobin traces the lives of ex-slaves up though Cincinnati and the intolerable Black Laws, though the Fugitive Slave Act, up the Toledo-Cincinnati Canal, across Lake Erie, and into nearly the whole of Ontario Province. There, Uncle Tom's Cabin is made material in the home of freedman Josiah Henson, beaten so badly as a young slave that he could never raise his hands head high again. He and his family were welcomed to Canada and received by Queen Victoria at the 1851 London World's Fair. He was forced to display his abolitionist materials at the American table, but erected a sign stating he had fled to Canada in order to survive. The sign drew Victoria's attention and everyone else's eye and support. Henson lived to be a respected political activist and public speaker until his death at age 94.

Tobin's blacks are not caricatures, but people like our present neighbors and leaders that thought and spoke intelligently, even if they had not yet learned to read. Henson himself wrote an autobiography that Harriet Beecher Stowe consulted when writing Uncle Tom's Cabin. Abolitionist John Brown is discussed in detail, but so is Harper's Ferry and its sole survivor, a brave black man. Female black news editor Mary Shadd also is portrayed in depth.

Such material is not presented in classrooms. However, Tobin presents dozens of such chronicles expertly, with photos and maps created by the author.

All Americans, ages 12 - adult should read Midnight to Dawn and discover the real abusiveness of slavery and discrimination.

Armchair Interviews agrees.