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by Bob Woodward
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Americas
  • Author:
    Bob Woodward
  • ISBN:
    074346107X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0743461078
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Gardners Books; 2nd edition (June 30, 2003)
  • Pages:
    416 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1627 kb
  • ePUB format
    1583 kb
  • DJVU format
    1994 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    159
  • Formats:
    mbr azw doc lrf


Bush At War by Bob Woodward (2002) presents a detailed record of President George W. Bush. The book catalogs the events of the first one hundred days following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

Bush At War by Bob Woodward (2002) presents a detailed record of President George W. Woodward does not present an outward thesis and also does not pass any ascertainable judgment or analysis on the events or decisions made by Bush or the National Security Council (NSC). The book serves primarily as a documentary which was written promptly following the terrorists attack and therefore at the time of publication had very little historical context.

Bush at War is a 2002 book by Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward recounting President George W. Bush's responses to the September 11 attacks and his administration's handling of the subsequent War in Afghanistan. Much of the book recounts events in meetings of the United States National Security Council (NSC), with the major players in the story, aside from the President, Dick Cheney, Colin Powell, George Tenet and Condoleezza Rice.

Bush at War - Bob Woodward. In 1991, I published a book called The Commanders which was about the 1989 invasion of Panama and the lead-up to the Gulf War during the presidency of Bush’s father, President George . Praise for BUSH AT WAR. Provides a rare chance to understand the leadership style of the man who now sits in the Oval Office. david ignatius, the washington post. The decision to go to war is one that defines a nation, both to the world and, perhaps more importantly, to itself, I wrote at the beginning of that book. There is no more serious business for a national government, no more accurate measure of national leadership.

With his unmatched investigative skill, Bob Woodward tells the behind-the-scenes story of how President George W. Bush and his top national security advisers, after the initial shock of the September 11 attacks, led the nation to war. Extensive quotations from the secret deliberations of th. . Extensive quotations from the secret deliberations of the National Security Council - and firsthand revelations of the private thoughts, concerns and fears of the president and his war cabinet - make Bush at War an unprecedented chronicle of a modern presidency in time of grave crisis.

ALSO BY BOB WOODWARD The War Within: A Secret White House History, 2006–2008 State of Denial The Secret Man (with a Reporter’s Assessment by Carl . Bush at War. Maestro: Greenspan’s Fed and the American Boom. Shadow: Five Presidents and the Legacy of Watergate.

ALSO BY BOB WOODWARD The War Within: A Secret White House History, 2006–2008 State of Denial The Secret Man (with a Reporter’s Assessment by Carl Bernstein) Plan of Attack.

Bush at War, Plan of Attack, State of Denial, and The War Within: A Secret White House History, 2006-08. 4 primary works, 4 total works. Book 1. by Bob Woodward

Bush at War, Plan of Attack, State of Denial, and The War Within: A Secret White House History, 2006-08. by Bob Woodward. Award-winning author and journalist Bob Woodwar. ore. Shelve Bush at War. Want to Read.

tells the behind-the-scenes story of how President George W. Extensive quotations from the secret deliberations of the National Security Council - and firsthand revelations of the private thoughts, concerns and fears of the president and his war cabinet - make chronicle of a modern presidency in time of grave crisis

Written by Bob Woodward, narrated by James Naughton.

Written by Bob Woodward, narrated by James Naughton. Narrated by: Boyd Gaines. Length: 7 hrs and 55 mins.

Bob Woodward Bob Woodward exposes one of the final pieces of the Richard Nixon puzzle in his new book The Last of the President’s Men. Woodward reveals the untold story o.

In eight Tuesdays each year, Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan convenes a small committee to set the short-term interest rate that can move through the American and world economies like an electric jolt. As much as any, the committee's actions determine the economic well-being of every American.

With his unmatched investigative skill, Bob Woodward tells the behind-the-scenes story of how President George W. Bush and his top national security advisers led the nation to war. Extensive quotations from the secret deliberations of the National Security Council and firsthand revelations of the private thoughts, concerns and fears of the president and his war cabinet, make BUSH AT WAR an unprecedented chronicle of a modern presidency in a time of grave crisis. Based on interviews with more than a hundred sources and four hours of exclusive interviews with the president, BUSH AT WAR reveals Bush's sweeping, almost grandiose vision for remaking the world. Woodward's virtual wiretap into the White House Situation Room reveals a stunning group portrait of an untested president and his advisers, three of whom might themselves have made it to the presidency. In BUSH AT WAR, Bob Woodward once again delivers a reporting tour de force.

JoJosho
Bush At War by Bob Woodward (2002) presents a detailed record of President George W. Bush. The book catalogs the events of the first one hundred days following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Woodward does not present an outward thesis and also does not pass any ascertainable judgment or analysis on the events or decisions made by Bush or the National Security Council (NSC). The book serves primarily as a documentary which was written promptly following the terrorists attack and therefore at the time of publication had very little historical context.
Woodward writes from an insider's perspective but freely admits in his "Note to Readers" how he obtained his information, thoughts, conclusions and actions by the primary actors in the text. The interview methodology was problematic due to the time span between actions, decisions and interviews. In this context (many officials were still serving the President) the interviewee is apt to relay information, thoughts and actions favorable to him or herself ignoring poor decisions or contrary opinions or others.
Woodward does an acceptable job with his presentation of issues and narrates in a manner consistent with fact based presentation. The author evenly establishes the tenor and tone of the NSC and Principal's meetings portraying areas of agreement and disagreement within the Bush Administration. The narrative highlights many questions posed by Principals, of which there were no substantive answers at the time. The internal disagreements surfaced in debate both in front and external of the President. The subtle debate alludes to friction within the NSC where individuals are advancing their individual views, ideology and agendas.
Students interested in foreign policy and the application of military force in support of national interests should read this book for several reasons. First, the author allows the reader examine how foreign policy is formed and how it can be changed based on sudden and direct threats to national interests. The book includes highlights of the President of the United States as a central actor in the NSC but also demonstrate other actors having significant influences on the scope and direction of a particular policy. The main influences of focus by the author are public sentiment, legal Presidential authority, international perception and diplomacy. All of these key influences serve to focus what ends are achievable and therefore shape the resultant policy. The process and the speed in which the administration had to make key decisions on policy with long term impact demonstrates despite study, formulas and theory, the process at which policy is arrived at is much more fluid.
Secondly, ten years after publication, the book can now be viewed in some historical context and provides the reader information to measure and judge the decisions during those one-hundred days after September 2001. Examination of the results of the policies and decisions made at the time illustrate how the Bush Doctrine worked and how the doctrine caused problems for long term U.S interests.
Ionzar
Woodward's intent was to provide a snapshot of the post-9/11 year of the Bush administration by talking to as many insiders as he could and recording their on-the-spot actions and observations. This "fly-on-the-wall" approach has its merits and drawbacks, especially as practiced in this book. On the plus side, he seems to have had quite extensive access to the major players, although apparently much of the verbatim quotes from high level meetings must have been reconstructed afterward by the parties. He does provide some sense of the personalities of these figures, and how they interact with each other. I had hoped the book might provide some clue as to the rationale behind the policy, and while there is some analysis, it is mainly "personality-based."
The limitations of this approach are readily evident: Woodward is careful not to step on anyone's toes, and one cannot help but wonder whther this is because everyone was acting as competently as he portrays them, or whether his reporting is designed to facilitate future access to this administration, widely viewed by the press as paranoid about negative images. If journalism is the first draft of history, then I suspect this book will not be deemed very useful a few years out. There is no analysis or critique of the administration, and everything they tell Woodward is taken at face value. Minute and unimportant troop deployments are covered in as much detail as much larger issues. The book seems like an effort to picture Bush as "in charge" and acting competently, without any reflection on the wisdom of the direction they are taking the country. As the book ends in late summer 1992, there is virtually nothing on how Iraq became Enemy No. 1, or the policy reasons behind that switch. And Woodward has an annoying fondness for the one-sentence paragraph.
All in all, of the eight or nine books I have read touching on 9/11 issues, this was the least satisfying, but it was certainly not totally devoid of value. As a useful counterpart on how a seemingly competent, in-charge administration, fueled on hubris and a willingness to assert American power, can get us into a load of trouble, Halberstram's "The Best and the Brightest" is worth a read. The trouble now is that this crew is neither the best nor the brightest.
Cemav
Woodward offers up a few insights into the White House decision-making processes in the wake of September 11. He offers a surprisingly complimentary view of President Bush, sketching him as decisive, even if not always sure what he is being decisive about. Defense Secretary Rumsfeld is depicted as screechy and infantile -- territorial to a fault (once churlishly refusing to offer Air Force One a military escort until a few minutes before takeoff). NSA Condi Rice is conciliatory --personally the closest to Bush, but this book suggests that she probably deserves some of the criticisms she receives in the press for being unable to control a cabinet full of loose cannons and huge egos. Secretary of State Colin Powell takes his lumps from Bush and the rest of the cabinet. His moderation and diplomatic skills are viewed with suspicion by Bush as well as war-hawks Cheney and Rumsfeld, and they often drop leaks to the press and work behind his back to undermine and embarrass him.
Woodward got good access to people and documents, and the fact that Bush gave him lengthy and private interviews probably accounts for the book's kid-glove treatment of the president. That was likely Bush's strategy in giving the interviews: co-opt Woodward into saying nice things. The book does provide some useful chronological accounting, from the September 11, 2001 attacks on the US to the December 7 final victory in Afghanistan. There are details of conversations and White House meetings among the administration principals as the anti-Taliban and Osama strategy took shape and played out. There is also some 'epilogue' material on the rush to war in Iraq that emphasizes the precarious position of Powell in the policy-making process. A good book, interesting without being groundbreaking.