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by Frank T. Proctor
Download Damned Notions of Liberty: Slavery, Culture, and Power in Colonial Mexico, 1640-1769 (Diálogos Series) fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Frank T. Proctor
  • ISBN:
    0826349668
  • ISBN13:
    978-0826349668
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  • Publisher:
    University of New Mexico Press (November 15, 2010)
  • Pages:
    296 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
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Prior to 1640, when the regular slave trade to New Spain ended, colonial Mexico was the second largest . has been added to your Cart. Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

Prior to 1640, when the regular slave trade to New Spain ended, colonial Mexico was the second largest slaveholding society in the New World.

Damned Notions of Liberty book. Prior to 1640, when the regular slave trade to New Spain ended, colonial Mexico was the second largest slaveholding society in the New World. Even so, slaves of African descent in Mexico were surrounded by a much larger indigenous majority, and by the second half of the seventeenth century there were more free Afromexicans than slaves in the colony.

Slavery and the Commerce Power: How the Struggle Against the Interstate Slave Trade Led to the Civil War. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2006. xii + 228 pp. ISBN 0-300-11470-2, $ 4. 0 (cloth).

Frank t. proctor III. 'Damned Notions of Liberty': Slavery, Culture, and Power in Colonial Mexico, 1640-1769. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press. 273 pp. ISBN 978-0-8263-4966-8. In providing a series of intertwined yet capably stand-alone chapters examining slavery during portions of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries from the standpoint of labour, marriage and community, magic, violence, resistance, and liberty, Proctor cements his position among the ranks of current scholars engaged in systematically demolishing characterizations of Mexico as lacking a significant African past. Proctor II. Download PDF book format. Proctor, Frank . 1970-. Publication, Distribution, et. Albuquerque. University of New Mexico Press, (c)2010. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Damned notions of liberty : slavery, culture, and power in colonial Mexico, 1640-1769 Frank T. Book's title: Damned notions of liberty : slavery, culture, and power in colonial Mexico, 1640-1769 Frank T. Library of Congress Control Number: 2010023986. Physical Description: xiv, 282 p. : ill. ;, 23 cm. Series Statement: Dia?logos series. Bibliography, etc. Note

Damned Notions of Liberty explores the lived experience of slavery from the perspective of slaves themselves to reveal how the enslaved may have conceptualized and contested their subordinated social positions in New Spain's middle colonial period (roughly 1630-1760s).

Damned Notions of Liberty explores the lived experience of slavery from the perspective of slaves themselves to reveal how the enslaved may have conceptualized and contested their subordinated social positions in New Spain's middle colonial period (roughly 1630-1760s)

Proctor, Frank . Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 253-271) and index.

Proctor, Frank . 253-271) and index

Culture, and Power in Colonial Mexico, 1640–1769 (Albuquerque, 2010), 22–25. See Bennett, Africans in Colonial Mexico, 22–27.

85 Frank T. Proctor III, Damned Notions of Liberty : Slavery, Culture, and Power in Colonial Mexico, 1640–1769 (Albuquerque, 2010), 22–25. This Afro-Mexican population was increasingly free, rather than enslaved, by the eighteenth century. 86 Africans and their descendants formed black confraternities in cities from Mexico to Lima, under the umbrella of the Catholic Church, from the earliest times through to the eigh- teenth century.

Albequerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2010. Proctor, Damned Notions of Liberty : Slavery, Culture, and Power in Colonial Mexico, 1640–1769. Albequerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2010. University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.

Prior to 1640, when the regular slave trade to New Spain ended, colonial Mexico was the second largest slaveholding society in the New World. Even so, slaves of African descent in Mexico were surrounded by a much larger indigenous majority, and by the second half of the seventeenth century there were more free Afromexicans than slaves in the colony. While it seems logical to assume that these unique demographic conditions may have created a situation ripe for slaves to challenge their oppression, Proctor's study reexamines those assumptions.

Damned Notions of Liberty explores the lived experience of slavery from the perspective of slaves themselves to reveal how the enslaved may have conceptualized and contested their subordinated social positions in New Spain's middle colonial period (roughly 1630-1760s). Relying heavily on trials from civil, ecclesiastical, and Inquisitorial courts, the study offers a detailed examination of some of the central issues to the culture of slavery--labor, family, cultural community, individual and collective agency, and access to liberation--to provide a more integrated picture of slavery in colonial Mexico.