» » How Cricket Was Used to Form the Identity of the Caribbean People: The Role of Brian Charles Lara

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by William H. Walcott
Download How Cricket Was Used to Form the Identity of the Caribbean People: The Role of Brian Charles Lara fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    William H. Walcott
  • ISBN:
    0773436049
  • ISBN13:
    978-0773436046
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Edwin Mellen Pr (September 30, 2010)
  • Pages:
    386 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1788 kb
  • ePUB format
    1275 kb
  • DJVU format
    1238 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    688
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Caribbean literature is the term generally accepted for the literature of the various territories of the Caribbean region. Literature in English specifically from the former British West Indies may be referred to as Anglo-Caribbean or, in historical.

Caribbean literature is the term generally accepted for the literature of the various territories of the Caribbean region. Literature in English specifically from the former British West Indies may be referred to as Anglo-Caribbean or, in historical contexts, West Indian literature, although in modern contexts the latter term is rare. Most of these territories have become independent nations since the 1960s, though some retain colonial ties to the United Kingdom.

Walcott attempts to rewrite the history of the Caribbean people from a. .Walcott explores these three phases in Names Read Article .

Walcott attempts to rewrite the history of the Caribbean people from a subaltern perspective. Walcott explores these three phases in Names. The second part of the poem describes how the colonisers named everything on the Caribbean Islands after places and structures in Europe. This naming process was important to the colonisers for both nomination and domination Read Article .

British African-Caribbean people are residents of the United Kingdom who are of Caribbean descent whose ancestors were primarily indigenous to Africa

British African-Caribbean people are residents of the United Kingdom who are of Caribbean descent whose ancestors were primarily indigenous to Africa. As immigration to the United Kingdom from Africa increased in the 1990s, the term has sometimes been used to include UK residents solely of African origin or as a term to define all Black British residents, though the phrase African and Caribbean has more often been used to cover such a broader grouping.

This book examines how the ever-changing role of colour in society has been reflected in manuscripts, stained glass .

This book examines how the ever-changing role of colour in society has been reflected in manuscripts, stained glass, clothing, painting and popular culture. Colour is a natural phenomenon, of course, but is is also a complex cultural construct that resists generalization and, indeed, analysis itself. No doubt this is why serious works devoted to colour are rare, and rarer still are those that aim to study it in historical context. The history of painting is one thing; that of colour is another, much larger, question.

Mr I who have cursed The drunken officer of British rule, how choose Between this Africa and the English tongue I love? Betray them both, or give back what they give? Derek Alton.

Walcott’s intricately metaphorical poetry captured the physical beauty of the Caribbean, the harsh legacy of colonialism and the complexities of living and writing in two cultural worlds. I who have cursed The drunken officer of British rule, how choose Between this Africa and the English tongue I love? Betray them both, or give back what they give? Derek Alton Walcott was born on Jan.

Their books, as well as being campaign tracts against slavery, also sought to declare through a first person insistence . Over the years the preoccupation of much of the literature has been with this troubled quest for identity and liberty.

Their books, as well as being campaign tracts against slavery, also sought to declare through a first person insistence, their own humanity, against the abuses of Empire. The arrival of Windrush. By the time of the arrival of the Empire Windrush at Tilbury Docks on June 21st 1948, there had been much change in the Empire itself and in the attitude of the people from the colonies. Britain was recovering from an exhausting and ruinous war, which had sapped her will to hang onto.

The history of the Caribbean reveals the significant role the region played in the colonial struggles of the European powers since the 15th century. In 1492, Christopher Columbus landed in the Caribbean and claimed the region for Spain

The history of the Caribbean reveals the significant role the region played in the colonial struggles of the European powers since the 15th century. In 1492, Christopher Columbus landed in the Caribbean and claimed the region for Spain. The first Spanish settlements were established in the Caribbean starting in 1493.

Caribbean literature is the term generally accepted for the literature of the various territories of the Caribbean region Most of these territories have become independent nations since the 1960s, though some retain colonial ties to the United Kingdom. Lecture 15 -Caribbean Poetry: Derek Walcott. The Present Future of Caribbean Literary and Cultural Studies Symposium Part 1. ✪ Vampires in Caribbean Literature - Dr. Giselle Anatol.

It was a great success and formed the beginning of a publishing empire that was to include Country Life . It was successful from the start, winning the approval of the Archbishop of Canterbury and hence that of the clerical public.

It was a great success and formed the beginning of a publishing empire that was to include Country Life (founded 1897), Wide World Magazine (1898), and, above all, The Strand Magazine (1891–1950), one of the first monthly magazines of light literature with plenty of illustrations. The Strand became enormously popular and is perhaps most famous for its Sherlock Holmes stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. Though it suffered at first from the defect that its pictures were by well-known artists but were not taken from life, it later sent artists all over the world.

This book analyzes how success and failure in West Indies Test Match cricket have been used as vehicles for forging identity of Caribbean people during post-colonial periods. Focusing primarily on the three-term leadership of Brian Charles Lara, this work offers an assessment of links among West Indies cricket, the search for collective anti-colonial assertiveness, and the striving of Anglo-Caribbean people for identities of self-determination. The main aims behind this work can be described: demonstrating that cricket can, and has been, used as a powerful instrument of social transformation and liberation among oppressed people, within and beyond fields of play; recovering significant socioeconomic forces that lie behind a lengthy period of shameful decline in West Indies Test Match cricket; showing how inability to appreciate the value of social transformation has contributed to loss of Caribbean dominance in Test Match cricket; and, expressing the elegance, grace, and beauty of a game, at its highest competitive level. These goals are clearly suited to the interests of those who wish to explore how oppressed persons of color have and have not been using routes of sporting improvisation and creativity to assert themselves over colonialism and neocolonialism.