» » The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, Vol. 1 (Classic Reprint)

Download The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, Vol. 1 (Classic Reprint) fb2

by Jefferson Davis
Download The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, Vol. 1 (Classic Reprint) fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Jefferson Davis
  • ISBN:
    1440085803
  • ISBN13:
    978-1440085802
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Forgotten Books (February 9, 2017)
  • Pages:
    770 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1929 kb
  • ePUB format
    1320 kb
  • DJVU format
    1646 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    923
  • Formats:
    lrf doc rtf lrf


Excerpt from The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, Vol. 1 Much of the past is irremediable the best hope for a resto ration in the future to the pristine purity and fraternity of the Union.

by. Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. by. Confederate States of America - History, United States - Politics and government 1861-1865, United States - History Civil War, 1861-1865, genealogy. New York, NY : D. Appleton.

The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1881) is a book written by Jefferson Davis, who served as President of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. Davis wrote the book as a straightforward history of the Confeder. Davis wrote the book as a straightforward history of the Confederate States of America and as an apologia for the causes that he believed led to and justified the American Civil War.

The Rise of the Confederate Government (The Barnes and Noble Library of Essential Reading). Published by Thriftbooks. My only complaint is that they got James McPherson, a confederacy-hating Marxist, to write the intro.

Jefferson Davis’ memoir provides a clear statement of the reasons behind the secession of the eleven sovereign states which formed .

Jefferson Davis’ memoir provides a clear statement of the reasons behind the secession of the eleven sovereign states which formed the Confederate States of America in 1861 (in theory thirteen states had Confederate armies, but two were silenced by disarmament enforced by Union troops).

A government, to afford the needful protection and exercise proper care for the welfare of a people, must have homogeneity in its constituents. It is this necessity which has divided the human race into separate nations, and finally has defeated the grandest efforts which conquerors have made to give unlimited extent to their domain. When our fathers dissolved their connection with Great Britain, by declaring themselves free and independent States, they constituted thirteen separate communities, and were careful to assert and preserve, each for itself, its sovereignty and jurisdiction.

Volume 1 By ed davis I have volume 1, purchased thru, I thought I was getting a matched set, but must have .

Volume 1 By ed davis I have volume 1, purchased thru, I thought I was getting a matched set, but must have mis read the wording. Product Description This collection of literature attempts to compile many of the classic works that have stood the test of time and offer them at a reduced, affordable price, in an attractive volume so that everyone can enjoy them.

The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government - Volume I Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America during the entire Civil War, 1861 to 1865 (1808-1889). This ebook presents The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government - Volume I, from Jefferson Davis. A dynamic table of contents enables to jump directly to the chapter selected. Table of Contents -01- About this book -02- PREFACE -03- INTRODUCTION -04- VOLUME I. THE RISE AND FALL OF THE CONFEDERATE GOVERNMENT -05- PART I. THE RISE AND FALL OF THE CONFEDERATE GOVERNMENT -06- PART II. The constitution -07- part III.

Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. Bookmate – an app that makes you want to read.

Excerpt from The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, Vol. 1Much of the past is irremediable the best hope for a resto ration in the future to the pristine purity and fraternity of the Union, rests on the Opinions and character of the men who are to succeed this generation: that they may be suited to that blessed work, one, whose public course is ended, invokes them to draw their creed from the fountains of our political history, rather than from the lower stream, polluted as it has been by self-seeking place-hunters and by sectional strife.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Kabei
Firsthand source. It is easy to see why he was not put on trial for treason as was originally intended. Jefferson Davis may very well have prevailed in court and so created a monumental northern political dilemma: the unconstitutional invasion of southern states. Even if one does not share the Confederate point of view, this remarkable book explains constitutional positions rarely taught in public schools. Indispensable primary source for any study of the War for Southern Independence.
Vichredag
Hoping whoever 'Pantianos Classics' is did a trustworthy job of maintaining accuracy of Davis's words. The back cover of this 8x11 paperback destroys their credibility for scholarly production, as the entire second paragraph of their text is "The principle text is split into four parts:" Anyone who confuses pal and ple is no scholar.
Mash
I think most people miss out on this work because the Confederacy was "wrong" and is so closely (and justifiably) identified with the evils of slavery. But read as a history and an exploration of the constitution and the intent of the founders as explained by the voice of the most important constitutional crisis in our history, this work is invaluable.

Right or wrong, slavery was protected by the constitution and slaves were simply viewed as property. When Davis considers the view the federal Government took toward that particular property, we see the beginnings of the erosion of all property rights and all other constitutional rights. The issue isn't whether slavery was terrible...it was. The issue is whether congress had a right to disregard the constitution without making an effort to change it and whether secession was legal when the Federal Government began disregarding the needs of the states.

No other book addresses these ideas with the authority that Jefferson Davis possesses by virtue of his great patriotic service to the Republic and his discovery that the Republic was failing its obligations to his home state.
Lestony
I liked reading about this from J. Davis' point of view. I still realize that it all comes down to the south wanting to consider slaves as property. Still a very educational read.
Wenes
This is a must read for every man, woman and child in America. True documents from history, such as this, show just how many lies we have been fed by the history-writers. The men of the South were NOT fighting for slavery, as we have all been taught. In fact, they had been working to phase it out gradually. Good ol' Abe "weird beard" Lincoln, however, saw an opportunity to expand the power of government by force, and used the ruse of slavery to garner support.
Unirtay
Jefferson Davis is one of the enigmas of our history. His epitaph might read something like: "The Failed Leader of the Lost Cause." He is generally portrayed as a crotchety old man of bad temper whose constant feuding with subordinates over petty issues distracted the Confederacy during its fight for life. Sam Houston famously said, "A drop of Jeff Davis' blood would freeze a frog."

And yet the Southern people chose this man above all others to be their President. He seems to have been enormously well respected in the South for his military career in the Mexican War and for his efficient administration of the War Department during Franklin Pierce's administration. As a Senator he was admired for his logic and oratory. Most Southerners who knew him spoke and wrote well of him. Those few who actively despised him were known for stirring up controversies themselves.

No question but that Davis was a complex character. He was no rabid Yankee-hater. He loved every inch of the United States, including the Northern States. Before the war he was one of the few Southerners cheered by Yankee crowds when he spoke in Northern cities like Boston and Portland. He urged patience with the Union at a time when many Southern hotheads were agitating for secession. Yet he also believed in State Sovereignty, the theory that any state had the unquestioned lawful right to leave the Union at any time that a majority of its people decided that the Federal Government no longer suited them. In the end State Sovereignty trumped Davis' unionism. When Davis became convinced that the majority of Mississippians desired to leave the Union he became a leader of the Secessionists.

Despite presiding over a lost war, Davis remained immensely popular in the South until the end of his days. And although many Yankees sung "Hang Jeff Davis from a sour apple tree" there were others like Horace Greely who befriended Davis and offered to pay his legal expenses if the Federal Government put him on trial for treason. He seems to have been remarkably well liked for a "crotchety, self-centered old fogy who lost a war that was fought for the awful cause of destroying the Union and preserving slavery."

Davis' character thus shows many contradictions. I think the best way to resolve these contradictions is to read this book and listen as Davis speaks for himself. Davis was indeed wedded to an archaic belief system of State Sovereignty and Slavery. But his book also makes clear that the cardboard-character image of him as a stubborn and pompous pettifogger and military martinet is also wide of the mark.

I came away with the impression that Jefferson Davis operated upon the principles of selflessness, due consideration for others' opinions, military competence, and fortitude in purpose that might have destined him to be remembered as a great leader --- IF he had led any cause other than the creation of a slave-holding confederation of states. IMO after reading this book my feeling is that a fitting epitaph for Jefferson Davis would be: "A leader of many virtues who was deceived by the current of his times into fighting for archaic ideals."
Fenrikasa
Reading this book made me realize (about a quarter of the way through) that my parents ought to get all their property taxes refunded to them, which ostensibly went toward "educating" kids in the public school I went to. It's not just that I didn't know this stuff after receiving multiple diplomas that proved I had been schooled. It's that I didn't know how much I didn't know. Americans will not know the riveting, counter-culture, counter-political-correctness, unsanitized truths of our history if we don't take it upon ourselves to read it ourselves. If all you know about the Civil War is what you got in elementary school, you know nothing, and what you don't know can in fact hurt you, as the result of these things is progressive loss of liberty even in our day. There is a straight line connecting the events of Jefferson Davis' day to our own.
For a historian of the Confederacy there are just a few really classic works: Douglas Southall Freeman's R. E. Lee and Lee's Lieutenants; E. Porter Alexander's Fighting for the Confederacy; Mary Boykin Chestnut's A Diary from Dixie; E. A. Pollard's A History of the Confederate States of America and Davis' Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. If you read these works, you will have a deep understanding of the issues and personalities that brought the ill fated Southern Confederacy into being.