» » Redeeming the Southern Family: Evangelical Women and Domestic Devotion in the Antebellum South

Download Redeeming the Southern Family: Evangelical Women and Domestic Devotion in the Antebellum South fb2

by Scott Stephan
Download Redeeming the Southern Family: Evangelical Women and Domestic Devotion in the Antebellum South fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Scott Stephan
  • ISBN:
    0820332224
  • ISBN13:
    978-0820332222
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Georgia Press (November 15, 2008)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1458 kb
  • ePUB format
    1146 kb
  • DJVU format
    1888 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    306
  • Formats:
    azw docx lit txt


Home Browse Books Book details, Redeeming the Southern Family: Evangelical Women. In the years leading up to the Civil War, southern evangelical denominations moved from the fringes to the mainstream of the American South.

Home Browse Books Book details, Redeeming the Southern Family: Evangelical Women. Redeeming the Southern Family: Evangelical Women and Domestic Devotion in the Antebellum South. Scott Stephan argues that female Baptists, Methodists, and Presbyterians played a crucial role in this transformation.

Redeeming the Southern Family book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Redeeming the Southern Family: Evangelical Women and Domestic Devotion in the Antebellum South as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Redeeming the Southern Family : Evangelical Women and Domestic Devotion in the Antebellum South. Scott Stephan argues that female Baptists, Methodists, and Presbyterians played a crucial role in this transformation

Southern Women at Vassar: The Poppenheim Family Letters, 1882–1916.

Southern Women at Vassar: The Poppenheim Family Letters, 1882–1916. January 2003 · History of Education Quarterly.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS, Redeeming the Southern Family: Evangelical Women and Domestic Devotion in the . Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Stephan, Scott. Published: Athens : University of Georgia Press, 2008.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Introduction: From Cane Ridge to the Bible Belt : evangelicalism, gender, and the southern household in the Antebellum era Taming the second great awakening : evangelical identity and worship patterns in the Antebellum South Courting women, courting God : strenuous courtships and holy unions Improvising on the ideal : evangelical marriages in the Antebellum South "Unto whom much is given" : childbirth, child rearing, and coming of age.

Scott Stephan argues that female Baptists, Methodists, and Presbyterians played a crucial role in this transformation

Scott Stephan argues that female Baptists, Methodists, and Presbyterians played a crucial role in this transformation. Stephan uses the journals and correspondence of evangelical women from across the South to understand the interconnectedness of women's personal, family, and public piety.

Redeeming the Southern Family: Evangelical Women and Domestic Devotion in the Antebellum South . Lincoln's Proclamation: Emancipation Reconsidered, The Steven and Janice Brose Lectures in the Civil War Era by BlairWilliam . YoungerKaren Fisher.

Redeeming the Southern Family: Evangelical Women and Domestic Devotion in the Antebellum South by StephanScott (pp. 101-103). YoungerKaren Fisher (pp. 108-110).

In the years leading up to the Civil War, southern evangelical denominations moved from the fringes to the mainstream of the American South. Scott Stephan argues that female Baptists, Methodists, and Presbyterians played a crucial role in this transformation. While other scholars have pursued studies of southern evangelicalism in the context of churches, meetinghouses, and revivals, Stephan looks at the domestic rituals over which southern women had increasing authority-from consecrating newborns to God's care to ushering dying kin through life's final stages. Laymen and clergymen alike celebrated the contributions of these pious women to the experience and expansion of evangelicalism across the South.

This acknowledged domestic authority allowed some women to take on more public roles in the conversion and education of southern youth within churches and academies, although always in the name of family and always cloaked in the language of Christian self-abnegation. At the same time, however, women's work in the name of domestic devotion often put them at odds with slaves, children, or husbands in their households who failed to meet their religious expectations and thereby jeopardized evangelical hopes of heavenly reunification of the family.

Stephan uses the journals and correspondence of evangelical women from across the South to understand the interconnectedness of women's personal, family, and public piety. Rather than seeing evangelical women as entirely oppressed or resigned to the limits of their position in a patriarchal slave society, Stephan seeks to capture a sense of what agency was available to women through their moral authority.