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by Michael Smith
Download The Emperor's Codes: The Breaking of Japan's Secret Ciphers fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Michael Smith
  • ISBN:
    1559708522
  • ISBN13:
    978-1559708524
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Arcade Publishing; Reprint edition (September 10, 2007)
  • Pages:
    340 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1662 kb
  • ePUB format
    1576 kb
  • DJVU format
    1335 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    504
  • Formats:
    mobi docx rtf txt


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In The Emperor's Codes,Michael Smith fully examines for the first time how Japan's codes were broken and the differing personalities and nationalities among the often eccentric codebreakers. He details the hard work and almost unfathomable dedication demonstrated by those relatively unsung heroes who contributed immeasurably to the Allies' eventual victory.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 305-309) and index. Singapore, December 1941 - Borrowing the Cables - A Spy Base in the Far East - Diplomatic Secrets - Preparing for War - Purple Magic - Working with the Americans - East and West Winds - The Americans Take the Lead - A Tricky Experiment - Midway: The Battle that Turned the Tide.

The wartime secrets of the British codebreakers based at Bletchley Park continue to be revealed.

Download The Emperors Codes: The Breaking of Japans Secret .

Download The Emperors Codes: The Breaking of Japans Secret Ciphers or any other file from Books category. In this gripping, previously untold story from World War II, Michael Smith examines how code breakers cracked Japan’s secret codes and won the war in the Pacific. The Emperor’s Codes moves across the world from Bletchley Park to Pearl Harbor, from Singapore to Colombo, and from Mombasa to Melbourne.

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In this gripping, previously untold story from World War II, Michael Smith examines how a group of eccentric codebreakers cracked Japan's secret codes and turned the tide of the war in the Pacific.

The Emperor's Codes: Bletchley Park's role in breaking Japan's secret cyphers. carousel previous carousel next. In The Emperor's Codes Michael Smith tells the story of how Japan's wartime codes were broken, and the consequences for the Second World War. He describes how the Japanese ciphers were broken and the effect on the lives of the codebreakers themselves.

Smith, Michael, 1952 May 1- The emperor's codes: the breaking of Japan's secret ciphers, Michael Smith. The result was an atmosphere at the highly secret Station X not unlike that of a weekend party at an English country mansion

Smith, Michael, 1952 May 1- The emperor's codes: the breaking of Japan's secret ciphers, Michael Smith. Originally published: London : Bantam Press, 2000. The result was an atmosphere at the highly secret Station X not unlike that of a weekend party at an English country mansion. The initial number of codebreakers in what was known for security reasons as ‘Captain Ridley's Shooting Party’ was little more than 200. They lived in hotels in the surrounding towns and all initially worked either in the mansion itself or in a neighbouring boys’ school th.

Электронная книга "The Emperor's Codes: Bletchley Park's role in breaking Japan's secret cyphers", Michael Smith

Электронная книга "The Emperor's Codes: Bletchley Park's role in breaking Japan's secret cyphers", Michael Smith. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Emperor's Codes: Bletchley Park's role in breaking Japan's secret cyphers" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The author of Station X describes how American and Britain's Bletchley Park code-breaking teams worked desperately to break the Japanese codes during World War II, an effort that played a key role in turning the tide of the war in the Pacific theater of World War II. Reprint.

Gardagar
As a young schoolboy during WWII growing up in Sydney, Australia I lived not far from a huge army barracks set up by the US Army. I was aware of the possibility of invasion by the Japanese, happy to see so many American GIs nearby and of course totally unaware of all those amazing people at Bletchley Park in the UK and the US equivalent the one in Melbourne and also in Colombo not to mention India. All of whom were at that time working so hard to bring the war to an end. Just amazing stuff to learn what they achieved and the undoubted affect their hard work achieved just with the big US naval battles in the Pacific.
These days of course there is NSA in Maryland, USA. I have read a good deal about the NSA and am pleased there is such an agency helping to keep us as safe as possible. Trying to equate the capacity the NSA has now with what the cryptographers had to do in WWII the mind boggles. If only they could have seen what was to follow them. The Emperor's Codes is a good book and certainly one I will return to for a second read.
Rainpick
I have several books about WWII codebreaking and this book is a welcome addition to my collection. I think I got hooked on the subject after reading "The Broken Seal" by Ladislas Farago. While serving in the USN I was stationed for a time at the Nebraska Avenue facility in Washington which during the war was the Navy's main codebreaking center in concert with the Army's facility known as Arlington Hall. I was there long after that business was all transferred over to the National Security Agency. There are two things about the book that jumped out at me. One, it documents just how widespread the whole operation was. We tend to think that Bletchley Park, Nebraska Avenue and Arlington Hall was where all the action was, but in fact there were facilities such as intercept stations all over place. Moreover, while Enigma and JN-25 were the main concern we forget that there were numerous lesser codes to be struggled with which this book does a good job bringing to light. Two, I was amused that the argument over who was the most stingy with sharing breakthroughs, the Brits or the Yanks, continues. Most books by US authors fault the Brits for not being as forthcoming as they should have been, while the Brits have the same opinion toward the Yanks. But in the end they got the job done.

At the very end of the book I was shocked to learn about the controversy regarding the book "Betrayal at Pearl Harbor." Mr. Smith reveals that Eric Nave's co-author, James Rusbridger distorted the original text to make it conform with his own interpretation of events. I wish he had expanded on this.
Zut
Very interesting, if overly detailed, story of the role of code breaking in the Pacific theater in WWII. While I consider myself knowledgeable on the subject, I knew almost nothing about the Pacific theater efforts. I was surprised at the British contribution and the extent of how petty turf battles prevented much of the coordination between the US and the UK. There was much discussion of how complex the Japanese codes and cyphers mainly because of the complexity of the Japanese language. Even the "morse" code was very much different from what we were accustomed. I was surprising to me that most of the Japanese communication encoding was done by human rather than machines. My only problem was the level of detail of the codes without any tutorial on the terms being used.
Funky
This book is written from the British point of view. Most work published in the US focuses on its achievements in breaking the Japanese diplomatic codes. Much of the American success was built on early achievements of Bletchly Park in England and much potential was wasted in bureaucratic wars fought in Washington instead of with the real enemy. This book includes a great deal of information about activities in Australia and India on important low level codes.
Tyler Is Not Here
Read it before, wanted it for my Kindle. Really interesting how thoroughly we and the Brits had penetrated the Japanese codes. In my opinion takes away from MacArthur's reputation a bit since he had advance notice of just about everything the Japanese were going to do.
Uanabimo
"MAGIC" Great recount of history. Would have given 4 stars if author would have "dumbed it down" for us non code breakers and math whiz savants. Not an easy read, but if you are a history buff, worth the effort!
Anayajurus
Very well researched narrative of Great Britain's contributions to the effort to break Japanese codes during WWII. At times, it reads a bit like a military history, mentioning this unit and that and saying they made valuable, but undetailed contributions as well. But at other times, it provides remarkable and previously unheralded material on the role of women in the effort and on the impact of the personal lives of the men and Romeo involved. Well worth the read!
Very factural and easy reading. Some of the facts tell what was going on how it was done and who did what and the results of this action.