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by Jack Pennington
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Americas
  • Author:
    Jack Pennington
  • ISBN:
    0595455425
  • ISBN13:
    978-0595455423
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    iUniverse, Inc. (September 12, 2007)
  • Pages:
    234 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1865 kb
  • ePUB format
    1519 kb
  • DJVU format
    1259 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    498
  • Formats:
    lrf mbr lrf lrf


Custer Vindicated book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Custer Vindicated book. A controversial evaluation, Custer Vindicated challenges the historical. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Jack L. Pennington.

See if your friends have read any of Jack L. Pennington's books. Pennington’s Followers. None yet. Pennington’s books.

by Jack Pennington (Author), dust jacket artwork of Charles M. Russell (Illustrator). This is a very advanced book on the Little Big Horn "what happened to Custer's battalion" book. ISBN-13: 978-0912783345.

Jack Pennington, is a dirt Late Model driver from Augusta, Georgia. Jack Pennington, is a dirt Late Model driver from Augusta, Georgia. He was an ace in late model dirt track racing before he moved up to the Busch Series in 1989 making six starts, finishing with 2 top tens

Jack Pennington, is a dirt Late Model driver from Augusta, Georgia. He was an ace in late model dirt track racing before he moved up to the Busch Series in 1989 making six starts, finishing with 2 top tens. He made his Winston Cup debut late in 1989, driving two races that year. He then ran fourteen races in 1990 in the Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme for Close Racing, he led in the 1990 Daytona 500 at one point with leading 6 laps in that race.

Cockram, Stephens and Williams’ book, Pennington’s Sacrifice in the Great War, recounts those fellows .

Cockram, Stephens and Williams’ book, Pennington’s Sacrifice in the Great War, recounts those fellows and the parts they had played in village life. The reason the book was written was to ensure Pennington’s outstanding support of the Great War continues to be remembered. Following the Great War a section of Pennington Common was taken to enlarge the churchyard. After a public meeting it was decided to place the War Memorial in the centre of this plot.

He critiques three well-known writers’ views as he lays the groundwork for reassessment of the long-time inference that the decisions Lt. Colonel Custer made until he reached Medicine Tail Coulee were not militarily sound. Pennington also explores the roles played by the Reno Court of Inquiry and the 7th Cavalry officers in making Custer a historic scapegoat.

Pennington suddenly raised his arm and called out to Babcock as he hurriedly shouldered his way toward the stage through the throng. When he got to the edge he motioned Babcock closer. Babcock leaned down to Pennington who seemed to speak excitedly for a few moments. Babcock looked like he asked a question. Pennington nodded an emphatic yes.

A controversial evaluation, Custer Vindicated challenges the historical views on the Battle of the Little Big Horn that depict Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer as an incompetent leader. In this his fourth book on Custer, Jack L. Pennington presents the results of his most recent research and the evidence that proves Custer was not at fault for the loss of his five companies or the defeat suffered by the 7th Cavalry. He critiques three well-known writers' views as he lays the groundwork for reassessment of the long-time inference that the decisions Lt. Colonel Custer made until he reached Medicine Tail Coulee were not militarily sound. Pennington also explores the roles played by the Reno Court of Inquiry and the 7th Cavalry officers in making Custer a historic scapegoat. Whatever you have read about or heard from other experts on the Battle of the Little Big Horn, Pennington encourages you to consider questions that have never been asked regarding a famous battle that, to this day, still remains one of the greatest conflicts in U.S. history.

Yojin
This book by Jack Pennington, who earlier wrote " Battle of Little Big Horn: A Comprehensive Study (Battle of Little Big Horn)", uses criticism of three hard study books on the Little Big Horn to substantiate his theory of a cover up by Major Reno and Captain Benteen (two wing commanders) to enhance their actions (or inactions) at the Little Big Horn (LBH) while also again restating his theory of why Custer's attack failed. This book is composed of serious anlysis of the failed cordination of the three attacking battalions at the LBH and it requires the reader to have a significant reading familiarity with the detailed controversies of the LBH battle. For those with limited reading on the subject, I recommend reading Utley's book on Custer as a primer, Gray's "Custer's Last Campaign: Mitch Boyer and the Little Bighorn Reconstructed" to understand some of the time analysis studies and to really crank up the controversial roles of Major Reno and Captain Benteen read "Abcs of Custer's Last Stand: Arrogance, Betrayal and Cowardice" by Arthur C. Unger. Essentially, Pennington challenges the testimonies of Reno and Benteen at Reno's court martial inquest held two years after the battle. The upper officer corp change the time sequences sinificfantly to place themselves in a better light and undermine the testimony of the enlisted couriers and other enlisted regarding the existence of attack orders. Pennington makes an excellent point that Custer was ahead of Reno in the attack phase echoing the well known fact that Custer was seen waving his hat from the bluffs above the LBH river before Reno made his attack and that Custer's attack across the ford at Medicine Coulee should have coincided with Reno's attack. The missing factor, Benteen's failed ability to support Reno, then Reno's dramtic giving away. By critiqing the other authors, it provides Pennington a platform, like an attorney, preseting his case through rebuttal. The final pages of the book are fascinating as Pennington expresses again his hypothesis that Custer was shot at the ford (Indian testimonies identify that an officer was shot) causing his battalion to lose funtional cohesion virtually losing the impetus to attack. This is a very challenging proposition but it is an interestig theory and a possible answer to what happened to Custer for at least 45 minutes where his attack seems to have stalled. Fox's great work "Archaeology, History, and Custer's Last Battle: The Little Big Horn Reexamined" theorizes that Custer was redirecting his attack to to another ford to chase the non-combatants and to take the energy out of the Indian's resistance. But Pennington makes a good point, why not keep the attack at Medicine Trail Coulee that was lightly defended and a direct route? Obviously, circumstances did change the plan, maybe not Custer's early loss but certianly a significant event. Greg Michno offers a theory of command consolidation that is very intriguing in his book "Lakota Moon". Indian testimony states that an officer was shot at the ford; the identity has not been exactly determined. Personally, I doubt that Custer was killed at the ford particularly since the command was seemingly structured for defensive (Calhoun Hill) and offensive action (Last Stand Hill) when the indians suddenly ruptured any plans in an abrupt and powerful attacking force. But this is a very interesting book particularly if one is willing to keep an open mind. The strength of the book is the detail on Benteen and Reno, two individuals who never completely spoke freely about what really happened. My only criticism is that a little more editting in the first part of the book may have made the reading a little more smoother as some points and statements seem to be repeated and a single chart showing the testified time conflicts between parties and what the more true estimated times were would have been a helpful reference to the arguments presented. It is quite fascinating if Reno and Benteen's junction was at least 2 hours sooner than they testified at the trial, then each had a vested interest to protect the other, not out of respect for each other but for survival.
Best West
Pennington's book is very well thought out.Written for the knowledgable LBH reader.Jack's conclusions are hard to ignore.Over the many years of reading available material,visting the battlefield many times,and having some first hand knowledge of manuvering several hundred mounted cavalrymen.I can state the only mistake Custer made at the Horn was to have Reno lead the first attack. I understand army policy,ranking,and senority,but Benteen,I believe,would have held his position come hell or high water! That simple trade of assignments could have made a huge difference.Of course Custer not attacking when he had an opportunity to do so was an unfortunate circumstance.
It has long been suspected that Custer was shot at ford B. Long before Pennington,King and others.As far as I'm concerned no reasonable explanation has ever been projected to otherwise explain the move North by the Custer companies.Enjoy the book!
Ylal
Interesting theory on the coverup ,of the Army ,at the
at the Battle of the Little Big Horn..
Custer was not a General during the Civil War because he was Stupid.
He had many victories and his men loved him.He was a hero during the Civil War.
Many people have forgotten this.
Winail
So someone has at last said what needed to be said, Custer while no saint was no better or worse than those around him. His big mistake was getting himself and his command killed and therefore was never able to answer all the slur's thrown against him. Grant always pointed out the high casualty rate of Custer's units, who is he to talk look at his own Civil War record (Cold Harbor to name but one disaster). Custer is not blameless in what happened at LBH but there are a lot of other factors as this book points out , so lets stop kicking GAC and blaming him alone for the defeat at the Big Horn, Reno and Benteen did not act like soldiers personal likes or dislikes should not have played a part in any of their decisions but one was a twisted bitter man and the other was too fond of the whiskey bottle. Yes Let Custer take his fair share of the blame but let's start spreading that blame around and lest also remember that we wanted the eventual out come, the subjugation of the Plains Indians. Shame on us all, Custer has been made a scape coat for all our sins towards the Lakota nation for too long now let him rest in peace.
Nalme
I agree that Custer has been the scapegoat all of these years. Though far from a perfect human (who is) Custer is the most misalingned slandered historical figure in American History. Too bad there aren't some brave directors and actors in liberal hollywood with enough guts to tell the real story on film based on true historical facts.....May Custer's soul rest in peace!
Levion
author was very prejudiced in his presentation. Instead of presenting facts he has his own opinion and agenda