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by William Bartram
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Americas
  • Author:
    William Bartram
  • ISBN:
    0486200132
  • ISBN13:
    978-0486200132
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Dover Publications (June 1, 1955)
  • Pages:
    448 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1443 kb
  • ePUB format
    1832 kb
  • DJVU format
    1916 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    757
  • Formats:
    mbr doc txt lit


Bartram's Travels is the short title of naturalist William Bartram's book describing his travels in the American South and encounters with American Indians between 1773 and 1777.

Bartram's Travels is the short title of naturalist William Bartram's book describing his travels in the American South and encounters with American Indians between 1773 and 1777. The book was published in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1791 by the firm of James & Johnson. The book's full title is Travels through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East and West Florida, the Cherokee Country, the Extensive Territories of the Muscogulges or Creek Confederacy, and the Country of the Chactaws

The Natures of John and William Bartram. William Bartram on the Southeastern Indians (Indians of the Southeast). I probably would never have found this book if it hadn't been for an accidental combination of two occurrences that somehow came together: One, I have developed a great affinity for the Library of America selections; and Two, I had taken a trip to Philadelphia and intervening heavy rain prevented me from finding Bartram gardens, a place I knew I would enjoy.

Электронная книга "Travels of William Bartram", William Bartram. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Travels of William Bartram" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

From 1773 to 1778, William Bartram, a trained naturalist, traveled through southern North America, noting the characteristics of almost everything he encountered: the rivers of Florida, the groves of wild oranges.

From 1773 to 1778, William Bartram, a trained naturalist, traveled through southern North America, noting the characteristics of almost everything he encountered: the rivers of Florida, the groves of wild oranges, the swamps and lagoons, the fish, the tropical snakes and reptiles, the land and aquatic birds, the Cherokee Indians' march toward civilization, the festivals of the Seminole, the customs of the Creeks. And it offers it in a format that still makes for exciting reading

William Bartram: Travels & Other Writings is kept in print with a gift from Deborah and Jason McManus to the Guardians of American Letters Fund made in honor of Cheryl Hurley.

William Bartram: Travels & Other Writings is kept in print with a gift from Deborah and Jason McManus to the Guardians of American Letters Fund made in honor of Cheryl Hurley. Travels Through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East and West Florida, the Cherokee Country, the Extensive Territories of the Muscogulges or Creek Confederacy, and the Country of the Chactaws.

Bartram, William, - 1739-1823 - Journeys - Southern States. First published in 1791 under title: Travels through North ' South Carolina, Georgia, East & West Florida, the Cherokee country. Indians of North America - Southern States. Southern States - Description and travel. Indians of North America.

William Bartram (April 20, 1739 – July 22, 1823) was an American naturalist. The son of Ann (née Mendenhall) and the naturalist John Bartram, William Bartram and his twin sister Elizabeth were born in Kingsessing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

William Bartram (April 20, 1739 – July 22, 1823) was an American naturalist. The son of Ann (née Mendenhall) and the naturalist John Bartram, William Bartram and his twin sister Elizabeth were born in Kingsessing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. As a boy, he accompanied his father on many of his travels to the Catskill Mountains, the New Jersey Pine Barrens, New England, and Florida. From his mid-teens, Bartram was noted for the quality of his botanic and ornithological drawings.

In 1773 the naturalist and writer William Bartram set out from Philadelphia on a four-year journey ranging from the Carolinas to Florida and Mississippi. For Bartram it was the perfect opportunity to pursue his interest in observing and drawing plants and birds.

William Bartram (1739-1823) was America's first native born naturalist, artist, and botanist and first author in the modern genre of writers who portrayed nature through scientific examination as well as personal understanding

William Bartram (1739-1823) was America's first native born naturalist, artist, and botanist and first author in the modern genre of writers who portrayed nature through scientific examination as well as personal understanding. The son of noted botanist, John Bartram, William, from his mid teens, was noted for the quality of his botanic and ornithological drawings.

The Travels of William Bartram, first published in 1791, was the first book to combine the natural sciences, travel and philosophy in a style that was not purely scientific. The Travels has it all-encounters with entrepid Seminoles, battles with alligators, observations on God's design for Nature and new plant discoveries. He influenced a generation of professional travelers, scientists and writers and was a mentor to some of America's greatest pioneer naturalists.

This is the first inexpensive, illustrated edition of one of the most delightful books of the 18th century. A major source work in American geography, anthropology, and natural history, it contains accurate and entertaining descriptions of the area of the New World now embraced by Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas.From 1773 to 1778, William Bartram, a trained naturalist, traveled through southern North America, noting the characteristics of almost everything he encountered: the rivers of Florida, the groves of wild oranges, the swamps and lagoons, the fish, the tropical snakes and reptiles, the land and aquatic birds, the Cherokee Indians' march toward civilization, the festivals of the Seminole, the customs of the Creeks. This material now offers a wealth of first-hand information that is not available elsewhere.And it offers it in a format that still makes for exciting reading. A classic not only of natural science and observation, Bartram's account also served as a source for Coleridge's "Kubla Khan" and "Ancient Mariner" and was held in high esteem as literature by Wordsworth, Carlyle, and Emerson.

Stylish Monkey
While visiting the Ockmulgee National Monument in Macon, Georgia, I saw this book in the gift shop. Apparently, Bartram passed through this very spot, so I decided to read the book. This book is the complete, unabridged, unparaphrased version. As I read the book, I also had in front of me the road maps from the several states of the South (topigraphical maps would be preferred). There are still some cities with the same names as the location was known in the mid-1770's, so one can follow along Bartram's approximate path. The long lists of plants/trees using their Latin names rather than common names are somewhat tiring, but it leaves one wishing that Bartram had had a camera to use! It was a fun book about the geography and nature of the South before civilization moved in and destroyed the old growth forests. It was strange, though, that during the period of his travels, Bartram never mentions the Revolutionary War that had begun about midway, time-wise, in his travels. He was still shipping his collections to England, apparently never considering that they may have gotten sunk in the ocean by a British naval vessel! I wonder what he was thinking as he returned to Philadelphia overland and what he discovered upon arriving there in 1777.
Fordrekelv
I had come across mention of Bartram's Travels in at least three other books. It was an early American best seller, so I decided to give it a read. The time frame is just before the Revolution, and the locales are the Carolinas and Florida. The author is a gentleman naturalist, who travels through the wilds describing the flora and fauna he comes across.

The book wont be for everyone. One does have to wade through Latin listings of plants and animals, as well as detailed descriptions of new finds, but the book is quite quaint in a positive sense, and the author's enthusiasm for the American Eden shines from the pages. The book also gives a good feel for the travel of the times, by foot, horse and boat. Language usage from over two centuries ago is also a treat. The environmental depredations of the European settlers are yet to come. Game is still incredibly plentiful. Native Americans are described favorably. While this is a book reporting scientific findings, it has a number of adventurous moments. Mr. Bartram comes across a murderous indian who was infuriated by white traders, and defuses the situation by gentlemanly courtesy and offering his hand. Trying to canoe with large alligators in pursuit, even to following him up onto land was another. Bartram was by himself, and had only a single shot fusee.

In short, the book is for history enthusiasts and lovers of the natural world. One can pick it up, put it down, and continue the Travels slowly.
Burisi
This is a wonderful book for anyone interested in the nature, landscapes, Indians, and early settlements of Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, and Tennessee around the year 1775. I haven't read this book in about 10 years, but I do remember checking it out of the library about 3 times, and I'm going to buy it for my birthday. The landscapes the Bartram describes will by and large never be seen again. Bartram described seeing a 45 square mile forest made up of nothing but magnolia, and dogwood trees. He saw forests that were covered by grapevines for miles. The trees were sometimes 20 feet thick, and the grapevines were so old that the vines were more than a foot thick. He saw canebrakes that covered miles, and some of the bamboo cane was 40 feet high. Canebrakes are practically extinct as an environment. He saw virgin forsts, abandoned Indian fields, overgrown Indian villages, open pine savannah forests, and uninhabited swamps. He saw wildlife which today would be scare, or extinct. He reported seeing a bobcat stalk a turkey. He pleaded with a market hunter not to kill a mother bear, and lamented the reaction of the bear cub to it's mother being killed. Bartram also reported seeing wolves, and bison skulls from recently killed buffulo. Bison were just rendered extinct in eastern Georgia at that time. Bartram took literary licence with some events. He exaggerated his encounters with alligators in Florida. After enjoying a meal of fish, rice, and oranges from the Spanish missionary orchards, he battled "fire breathing dragons." Bartram had many encounters with the Creeks, and Cherokees, and most were friendly. He feasted with Indian cattle raisers. Bartram also gives a good account of early settlements. If you decide to get this book, also get a copy of a tree guide with the scientific names, because Bartram tells exactly what kind of trees he came across in each forest. What I wouldn't give to see what Bartram saw?
Jaiarton
The book itself was in good condition. I found the botanical information a bit overwhelming because no common names were there for anything, which I wasn't expecting. I'll try to slug through the rest of the book but I think I'm going to be on the internet a lot to find out the names I'm used to on these things. I forgot William's dad was a botanist and would look at all plants with the Latin names. I'm very glad that someone printed it though. And I wonder if his father's books are available.
Qutalan
Very cool book. Awesome facts and his appreciation for the indigenous people and their skills and civilization is very evident and seemly objective. Kind of hard to read as type is small and not as clear as modern type and the manner of speech is hundreds of years old.
Gela
This an astonishing book...worth reading just for the section describing Bartram's dream-like trip up Florida's St. John's River during the early days of the American Revolution.

Bartram was a naturalist, not a novelist or travel writer in the modern sense, but one soon grows used to his style. Especially considering the time and place through which he moved, Bartram's gentle spirit and enthusiasm for what he saw are an inspiration.
Bil
Amazing historical account
This book was a journal of Bartram's travels through the southeast. Being a journal and not written for reading like a story, I lost interest and didn't finish the book.