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by Jeremy Agnew
Download Brides of the Multitude - Prostitution in the Old West fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Jeremy Agnew
  • ISBN:
    1932738495
  • ISBN13:
    978-1932738490
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Western Reflections Publishing Company; First edition (June 9, 2008)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1580 kb
  • ePUB format
    1150 kb
  • DJVU format
    1684 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    574
  • Formats:
    doc azw lrf mbr


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Brides of the Multitude .has been added to your Cart. In short, for academic purposes Brides of the Multitude promises more headache than reward. 10 people found this helpful.

The prose of this book isn't the most interesting but it is straightforward and easy to understand, with lots of fun anecdotes about things that happened in the Wild West. Jeremy Agnew provides a look not just as prostitution itself but the context in which so much prostitution occurred and the effect that it had on the culture and economy. My only complaint would be that prostitution is treated with such detachment.

It explains who these women were, their reasons for becoming prostitutes, the types of establishments of prostitution, the conditions under which the women worked, and problems associated with sexually transmitted diseases and contraception.

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Excellent book for that. Well written if a little redundant. You read about one boom town red light district, you've read about them all. Excellent book for that.

Find nearly any book by Jeremy Agnew. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Colorado Above Treeline: Scenic Drives, 4WD Trips, And Classic Hikes. ISBN 9781565794986 (978-1-56579-498-6) Softcover, Westcliffe Pub, 2005.

prostitutes of the old west--I feel a grave sadness for these "Soiled Doves" as some of them were referred to in.Posts about prostitution history written by Jan MacKell Collins. Old West prostitute well if only prostitutes today would dress like this.

prostitutes of the old west--I feel a grave sadness for these "Soiled Doves" as some of them were referred to in some parts. Some were beaten and raped--yes, a prostitute can be raped. I remember this photo from a large coffee table book we had when I was a child. The phrase in my memory, to this paragraph, was these women helped tame the West by making men "shave, bathe and behave".

Life was hard in the Old West as young men flooded the frontier looking for work in an environment where they vastly . Prostitutes - or 'soiled doves' and 'sportin' women' as they were commonly known - were a fixture in western towns and cities.

Life was hard in the Old West as young men flooded the frontier looking for work in an environment where they vastly outnumbered women, leading to a golden age of brothels run by savvy madams. These photographs from the 19th Century American Frontier show prostitutes inside their bedrooms, mingling with potential customers and scarlet women showing off their wares for the camera.

Brides of the Multitude is a fascinating, historically accurate account of why prostitution ran rampant in the Old West during the prudish Victorian period of the United States. It explains who these fallen women were and touches on their reasons for becoming prostitutes. It details the types of establishments of prostitution that existed, the conditions under which the women worked, and the many problems associated with sexually transmitted diseases and contraception. Weaving facts with colorful anecdotes, author Jeremy Agnew presents a fascinating look at the ladies who conducted business in the infamous red light districts located throughout the frontier. Also in this book, the author debunks many of the myths associated with prostitution in the Old West. He points out the difference between rural and urban soiled doves, as well as Eastern and Western prostitutes. Agnew describes a definite social order that existed among the prostitutes. And, in frank, but not too graphic terms, he brings to light a subject that is not easy to research, but was an integral part of everyday life of the time.

Damdyagab
This is a most excellent and informative book of not only the woman of the old west, but the culture in which they lived. It covers how many of them came to their profession and the victorian society in which they lived. Many surprises here. I highly recommend this informative and interesting read!
Erennge
fun read
Niwield
Came in great shape.
Mave
The book addresses a fascinating subject with a lot of interesting material. The only drawback is it should have been edited better to reduce repetition.
Marilore
In Brides of the Multitude: Prostitution in the Old West, enthusiast Jeremy Agnew attempts to explain why prostitution flourished in the Old West during the prudish Victorian Era. Focusing primarily on Colorado, the author's home state, this social history examines: how the prudence and economic concerns of the Victorian period affected prostitution; where these fallen women and their Johns were from and what they were like (demographically); what led women to lives as prostitutes; the conditions under which these women worked; the types of establishments they used (including saloons, gambling halls and other auxiliary businesses); problems with venereal disease, contraceptives, and alcohol and drug addiction; and the differences between urban and rural, and Eastern and Western prostitutes.

Overall, Agnew contends that the prevalence of young, unattached men that dominated the movement out west--by homesteaders, miners, railroad workers, soldiers, and cattlemen--led to an overall acquiescence of prostitution. However, whether this is the author's primary argument is difficult to ascertain as Brides of the Multitude contains an abundance of information that is unsubstantiated, unorganized, and unusable.

The assertions of the work are unsubstantiated in that in the two hundred and sixteen pages of text there are only forty-eight endnotes, most of which contain unnecessary information rather than sources. Indeed, even references to census records, books and studies do not have citations. For example, Agnew claims that "proper Victorians would not believe the modern scientific evidence that many women have a higher sex drive and higher physical sexual capacity than men" (24). As there is no reference to the study in which he refers, this reviewer is put in the unfortunate position of siding with the "proper Victorians." Another case in point is the statement "studies have shown that prostitutes generally do not enjoy sex with their clients" (34). Although this reviewer will only take a disinterested position on such a topic, the claim is, once again, unsubstantiated. Finally--and most outlandish--is Agnew's contention that despite some scholars dismissing anecdotes as fables, "enough stories have been handed down from people born in the late Victorian era to authenticate them" (22). Attached to this is one of the five endnotes in the first, eighteen-page, chapter, which reads, "as one source, stories repeated by the author's grandparents, who were born in the 1880s, confirm this" (226-227).
A much less vital problem than the unauthenticated claims is that Brides of the Multitude is also unorganized. Although the book is broken down into three sections (titled The Women, The Places and The Men) and eleven chapters that could form a comprehensible arrangement, they are awkwardly laid out with excessive subheadings (arranged in no particular order) that often overlap topically. Again, this would be a much more valuable critique if it were only referring to a book whose information needed to be organized, rather than substantiated.

Overall, Brides of the Multitude is not academic and should not be treated as such. As far as can be ascertained by this reviewer, no scholarly evaluation of the work exists. If a historian repeated Agnew's claim that "estimates made in the mid-1800s were that one woman in twenty had turned to prostitution at one point in her life in order to survive" (35), they might be called upon to vindicate the statement. In short, for academic purposes Brides of the Multitude promises more headache than reward.