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by Michael Beck,Tony Horwitz
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Americas
  • Author:
    Michael Beck,Tony Horwitz
  • ISBN:
    0553525832
  • ISBN13:
    978-0553525830
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Random House Audio; Abridged edition (March 2, 1999)
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1885 kb
  • ePUB format
    1453 kb
  • DJVU format
    1494 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    928
  • Formats:
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Confederates in the Attic (1998) is a work of non-fiction by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tony Horwitz

Confederates in the Attic (1998) is a work of non-fiction by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tony Horwitz. Horwitz explores his deep interest in the American Civil War and investigates the ties in the United States among citizens to a war that ended more than 130 years previously. He reports on attitudes on the Civil War and how it is discussed and taught, as well as attitudes about race.

Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil Wa.

Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War. Written by Tony Horwitz. Narrated by Michael Beck. The result is an adventure into the soul of the unvanquished South, where the ghosts of the Lost Cause are resurrected through ritual and remembrance. a martyr and hero; and in the book's climax, Horwitz takes a marathon trek from Antietam to Gettysburg to Appomattox in the company of Robert Lee Hodge, an eccentric pilgrim who dubs their odyssey the 'Civil Wargasm.

Confederates in the Attic. has been added to your Cart

Confederates in the Attic. has been added to your Cart. When prize-winning war correspondent Tony Horwitz leaves the battlefields of Bosnia and the Middle East for a peaceful corner of the Blue Ridge Mountains, he thinks he's put war zones behind him. But awakened one morning by the crackle of musket fire, Horwitz starts filing front-line dispatches again this time from a war close to home, and to his own heart.

Acclaim for TONY HORWITZ’s Confederates in the Attic The freshest book about divisiveness in America that I have . Horwitz’s economical style and understated humor make his writing a joy to read. He is the kind of writer who could make a book on elevators interesting.

Acclaim for TONY HORWITZ’s Confederates in the Attic The freshest book about divisiveness in America that I have read in some time. The New York Times Horwitz’s economical style. The Philadelphia Inquirer. The South rises again in this remarkable study.

In Confederates in the Attic, journalist Tony Horwitz explores the ways in which the Civil War is still present in. .

In Confederates in the Attic, journalist Tony Horwitz explores the ways in which the Civil War is still present in Southern culture. I was a Civil War re-enactor in junior high and high school, and I particularly appreciated his chapter on that very strange hobby: "A Farb of the Heart. Farb, by the way, is re-enactor slang for all things inauthentic

By Tony Horwitz Read by Michael Beck. Written with Horwitz’s signature blend of humor, history, and hard-nosed journalism, Confederates in the Attic brings alive old battlefields and new ones ‘classrooms, courts, country bars’ where the past and the present collide, often in explosive ways.

By Tony Horwitz Read by Michael Beck. By Tony Horwitz Read by Michael Beck. Part of Vintage Departures. History: American, Journeys, History - General History, Customs & Traditions, United States, History, History - ., Influence, Horwitz, Tony,, HIS, HIS036050, Essays & Travelogues, United States - Civil War, History, United States, Civil War Period (1850-1877), Reading Group Guide, Civil War, 1861-1865, Southern States, 1861-1865, Civil War, 1958-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

Read "Confederates in the Attic Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War" by Tony .

When prize-winning war correspondent Tony Horwitz leaves the battlefields of Bosnia and the Middle East for a peaceful corner of the Blue Ridge Mountains, he thinks he's put war zones behind him.

The result is an adventure into the soul of the unvanquished South, where the ghosts of the Lost Cause are resurrected through ritual and remembrance.

BOSTON (AP) - Tony Horwitz, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and the best-selling author of Confederates in.

BOSTON (AP) - Tony Horwitz, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and the best-selling author of Confederates in the Attic, has died. He was 60. Horwitz died Monday of apparent cardiac arrest in Washington, . In addition to Confederates in the Attic, which chronicles modern-day Southern attitudes about the Civil War, he wrote seven other books, including Blue Latitudes, in which he traced Capt. James Cook’s 18th century journeys in the Pacific, and Midnight Rising, about John Brown’s 1859 raid on Harpers Ferry.

When prize-winning war correspondent Tony Horwitz leaves the battlefields of Bosnia and the Middle East for a peaceful corner of the Blue Ridge Mountains, he thinks he's put war zones behind him. But awakened one morning by the crackle of musket fire, Horwitz starts filing front-line dispatches again this time from a war close to home, and to his own heart.Propelled by his boyhood passion for the Civil War, Horwitz embarks on a search for places and people still held in thrall by America's greatest conflict. The result is an adventure into the soul of the unvanquished South, where the ghosts of the Lost Cause are resurrected through ritual and remembrance.In Virginia, Horwitz joins a band of 'hardcore' reenactors who crash-diet to achieve the hollow-eyed look of starved Confederates; in Kentucky, he witnesses Klan rallies and calls for race war sparked by the killing of a white man who brandishes a rebel flag; at Andersonville, he finds that the prison's commander, executed as a war criminal, is now exalted as a martyr and hero; and in the book's climax, Horwitz takes a marathon trek from Antietam to Gettysburg to Appomattox in the company of Robert Lee Hodge, an eccentric pilgrim who dubs their odyssey the 'Civil Wargasm.'Written with Horwitz's signature blend of humor, history, and hard-nosed journalism, Confederates in the Attic brings alive old battlefields and new ones 'classrooms, courts, country bars' where the past and the present collide, often in explosive ways. Poignant and picaresque, haunting and hilarious, it speaks to anyone who has ever felt drawn to the mythic South and to the dark romance of the Civil War.

Gold Crown
I have been a reader of Civil War books for over 50 years and none ever made me laugh like this one did, and none covered modern reenactment psychology either. This is not a book to learn specifics about battles and leaders and the War in general, but rather a book about how many in the South today (or when it was written twenty five years ago <close enough to today> ) see it. It is a virtual travelogue of the South with respect to the Civil War and its modern effects. One can read each chapter freestanding if one wants, in any order one wants and not miss much. Each chapter is somewhat stand alone. The only thread from chapter to some chapters if his reenactor friend that he joins from time to time.
The author sleeps in the rain and cold, almost gets beat up in redneck bars, and meets a wide variety of characters during his travels. You will understand Southern mentality much better after reading this book.
Malalrajas
Horwitz's books are always informative and amusing! Great read and while not in any way similar to Hillbilly Elegy (recommended reading for all who wish to understand Southern culture), the book is instructive about a part of the country and ways of life that---being a Westerner---I knew little about. It's funny but certainly not in a negative way. Having said that, I feel that I've learned some important lessons and certainly will look at the "stars and bars" culture differently. Well written and timely for today's readers.
Huston
This is good.. Well written and researched. There are many things that could be said. Basically the war is still going on in the minds of many Southerners both white and black.
Although the government is forcing integration those who live there pretty much segregate themselves.
The people Tony meets are very interesting, once again I am speaking about both colors.
The reinactors are a story all alone.
Long book, so set aside time. I have found best read by good old Kindle, if you are a little
long in the tooth.
That is about it, I could go on and on, but it is time to milk the cow, so, if you are interested in the
present day south and the civil war, you will gain a lot of interesting stuff.

Good book.

Dutch................
Gashakar
I read the book all night for two nights last week. Really enjoyed the book. The best parts of the book are when he writes about Robert Lee Hodge, a "hardcore" preservationist of the War Between The States in the South on the battlefield. The horrors of the War are also presented. Anyone who thinks history is boring should read this and think again. Tony Horwitz, the author, is a Pulitzer Prize winning writer.
The book is best when he is writing about Hodge, other parts get a little bogged down when he interviews blacks and whites about their opinion of the War. That part is a little slow, but I guess he was trying to make a point. Sadly, the Battlefields are being covered up by strip centers and fast food joints. Will there be a McDonald's in the middle of Shiloh?

Hodge, according to his web site, now makes films and sometimes gives tours of the battlefields. I would like to see some of them, but not as he does with his "hardcore" buddies by lying in freezing battlefield ditches in filthy clothes, eating hardtack and sowbelly, that is why he is hardcore! As authentic as can be without actually using real bullets.
Not-the-Same
My late brother moved to Maryland (from Vermont) back in the early '90's. He gave me a copy of this book while on a visit "home" some years later. Being a "Yankee," (even worse, being brought up in Canada,) I had little understanding of the depth of feeling that many Southerners had (and still have) to the "Lost Cause" that was the Civil War. I let it sit on my bookshelf for quite a while, the subject of Civil War re-enactors was of little interest to yours truly, ( I likened it to grown men playing "Cowboys and Indians,) then I picked it up. I remember devouring the book in about two days, back in 1996 or '97- it was a terrific read. I loaned it to someone, and never got it back.
I got to thinking about the book after the horrific church shooting in Charleston, S.C. a few years back. That, along with the historic Obama Presidency (though I was never was a fan or supporter of his ) made me think of all the progress we've made as a Nation, but all the hard work left to do. An acquaintance, who has Southern roots, and spent much of his life as a professor at a "historically Black college," remembered the book and the author-I ordered it the next day. I read it much more slowly this time, savoring the atmosphere and Horwitz's story telling. The funny stuff is just as funny, the narrative just as compelling, and the book is, perhaps, even more poignant in it's observations, given the current climate.What with the ongoing, perhaps never-ending debates over the Confederate flag, and the dismantling of Confederate memorials all over the South, I've come to the conclusion that I will be able to re-read this excellent account twenty years from now, and the Civil War (or War Between the States,) will still be "unfinished."
Hidden Winter
Excellent writing. Fascinating and detailed look at the true re-enacters of the Civil War. They starve themselves, sleep out in the cold, and don't wash their clothing or bodies. They're plagued by insects and the weather. Each of them seeking his own authentic experience. Mind boggling and fascinating.