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Download The Great Thirst: Californians and Water, 1770s–1990s fb2

by Norris Hundley Jr.
Download The Great Thirst: Californians and Water, 1770s–1990s fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Norris Hundley Jr.
  • ISBN:
    0520077865
  • ISBN13:
    978-0520077867
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of California Press (June 10, 1992)
  • Pages:
    551 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1932 kb
  • ePUB format
    1521 kb
  • DJVU format
    1765 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    990
  • Formats:
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The Great Thirst is a fascinating history of the development of California's water resources. Read The Great Thirst and John Walton's Western Times and Water Wars ( LJ 1/92) for an understanding of how water interests shaped California's social and political character

The Great Thirst is a fascinating history of the development of California's water resources. Read The Great Thirst and John Walton's Western Times and Water Wars ( LJ 1/92) for an understanding of how water interests shaped California's social and political character. For academic and larger public libraries. Irwin Weintraub, Rutgers Univ.

Berkeley : University of California Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

The Great Thirst book. Not surprisingly, the story of Californians and water is a fascinating one, filled with enough intrigue and plot twists to power a spellbinding novel. California is obsessed with water  . Here for the first time Norris Hundley, a noted historian o California is obsessed with water. The need for it - to use and profit from it, to control and manipulate it - has shaped California history to a remarkable extent.

Not surprisingly, the story of Californians and water is a fascinating one, filled with enough intrigue and plot twists to. .

Not surprisingly, the story of Californians and water is a fascinating one, filled with enough intrigue and plot twists to power a spellbinding novel. One of Hundley's most important contributions to California water history, besides creating a clear, engrossing narrative of its intricacies, is to demolish the image of a monolithic "water empire" managed by a coercive elite. There have always been competing individuals and interests in every question of water use, and the mammoth projects - dams, aqueducts, and irrigation districts - have all come about through uneasy, constantly shifting political alliances. The story is still being written, and it revolves.

Norris Cecil Hundley, Jr. (October 26, 1935 – April 28, 2013) was an American academic, historian, and writer, best known for his 1992 book, The Great Thirst. (October 26, 1935 – April 28, 2013) was an American academic, historian, and writer, best known for his 1992 book, The Great Thirst, which details the history of water usage in California from 1770 to the 1990s. Both as a historian and an academic, Hundley was renowned for inventing the professional history of water rights in the Western United States.

Norris Hundley, Jr. is Professor of American History at the University of California, Los Angeles. Библиографические данные. Norris Hundley Jr. Издатель. University of California Press, 2001.

Norris Hundley, J. Download PDF book format. Personal Name: Hundley, Norris. Publication, Distribution, et. Berkeley. University of California Press, (c)1992. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. The great thirst : Californians and water, 1770s-1990s Norris Hundley, Jr. Book's title: The great thirst : Californians and water, 1770s-1990s Norris Hundley, Jr. Library of Congress Control Number: 91040995. Physical Description: xix, 551 p. : ill. ;, 24 cm. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. -) and index. Geographic Name: California History. The Great Thirst: Californians and Water: A History. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001. This is much more than a book about Californians and their water, for Hundley of necessity includes all the ramifications and challenges of water resources: growing population, environmental hazards, electrical power, conflicting bureaucracies at federal, state, county, city, and special district levels; the rivalry of agriculture and metropolitan areas, historic conflicts such as the battles for Hetch Hetchy and Mono Lake, legal precedents, and much, much more.

Home Arts Culture magazines Hundley, Norris . J. Great Thirst: Californians and Water, 1770s-1990s, 1992, rev. ed. as The Great Thirst: Californians and Water: A History, 2001; Las aguas divididas: Un siglo de controversia entre Mexico y Estados Unidos, 2000. Jr. Print this article. Print all entries for this topic. Address: Dept of History, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1473, . Cite this article Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

by Norris Hundley Jr. (Author). The author does an excellent job. -Martin Mitchell Books For The Western Library.

California is obsessed with water. The need for it - to use and profit from it, to control and manipulate it - has shaped Californian history to a remarkable extent. Not surprisingly, the story of Californians and water is filled with intrigue and plot twists. The author tells that story from before the arrival of Europeans to the drought that ushered in the 1990s. He describes the waterscape in its natural state: a scene of incredibly varied terrain and watercourse and wildly fluctuating rainfall. The aboriginal Californians did little to alter this natural state. Aside from limited diversions of streams for irrigation or fish harvesting, they simply took what water they needed from places they found it. Early Spanish and Mexican immigrants, although they exploited water supplies on a large scale for the settlements, considered water primarily a community resource, not to be monopolized by anyone. It was the Americans, arriving in ever-increasing numbers after the Gold Rush, who transformed California into a collection of the nation's pre-eminent water seekers. By the later 20th century, a large, colourful cast of characters and communities had wheeled and dealed, built, diverted and conived its way to an entirely different California waterscape. The author demolishes the image of monolithic "water empire" managed by a homogeneous elite. There were always competing individuals and interests in every question of water use, and the mammoth projects - dams, aquaducts and irrigation districts - all came about through uneasy, constantly shifting political alliances. The story is still being written and it revolves, as it always has, around the consequences of human values for the waterscape.