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by Aaron Spencer Fogleman
Download Hopeful Journeys: German Immigration, Settlement, and Political Culture in Colonial America, 1717-1775 (Early American Studies) fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Aaron Spencer Fogleman
  • ISBN:
    0812233093
  • ISBN13:
    978-0812233094
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Univ of Pennsylvania Pr; 1st Edition edition (March 1, 1996)
  • Pages:
    257 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
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    1344 kb
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    1124 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
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    177
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Hopeful Journeys traces the German migrant groups from their origins to their places of final settlement in the colonies.

Hopeful Journeys traces the German migrant groups from their origins to their places of final settlement in the colonies. The immigrants' Old World customs, beliefs, and connections did not entirely disappear as they adapted to life in the colonies; instead, the Germans' past ways helped shape behavior in the New World. It is shorter than it appears (about 150 pages) as the appendices and endnotes consume a lot of pages.

Hopeful Journeys book. By 1776, the non-Native American population had increased tenfold, and non-English Europeans and Africans dominated new immigration. Hopeful Journeys: German Immigration, Settlement, and Political Culture in Colonial America, 1717-1775. Of all the European immigrant groups, the Germans may ha In 1700, some 250,000 white and black inhabitants populated the thirteen American colonies, with the vast majority of whites either born in England or descended from English immigrants.

In 1683 Francis Daniel Pastorius became the founder of Germantown, Pennsylvania, the first German settlement in colonial North America.

Download Citation Hopeful journeys: German immigration, settlement, and political culture in colonial America, 1717-1775 In 1700, some 250,000 white and black inhabitants populated the thirteen American colonies, with the vast majority of whites either born i. .It is particularly concerned with how a distinct German-American culture manifests over time as seen through these artisans’ produced materials and structures. In 1683 Francis Daniel Pastorius became the founder of Germantown, Pennsylvania, the first German settlement in colonial North America.

Home Browse Books Book details, Hopeful Journeys: German Immigration, Settlement . Aaron Spencer Fogleman has written the first comprehensive history of this eighteenth-century German settlement of North America.

Home Browse Books Book details, Hopeful Journeys: German Immigration, Settlement,.

Aaron Spencer Fogleman. 5 Germans in the Streets: The Development of German Political Culture in Pennsylvania

Aaron Spencer Fogleman. Series: Early American Studies. 5 Germans in the Streets: The Development of German Political Culture in Pennsylvania. For a few days in late September and early October 1765 there was a great deal of excitement on the streets of Philadelphia. More than 2,600 German-speaking immigrants from near and far descended on the city to be naturalized during the September Supreme Court session. This was more than one-fourth of all naturalizations in all thirteen colonies during the colonial period, ten times the number in Pennsylvania in 1764, and thirty times the number in the previous court session in April.

Read Hopeful Journeys by Aaron Spencer Fogleman for free with a 30.Early american studies. Chapter 5. Germans in the Streets: The Development of German Political Culture in Pennsylvania. Germans and Pennsylvania Politics

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Germans and Pennsylvania Politics. Thomas Penn and the Germans. German Political Interests. Penn’s New Policy and the German Response.

Early American Studies. Aaron Spencer Fogleman is Professor of History at Northern Illinois University.

Hopeful Journeys: German Immigration, Settlement, and Political Culture in Colonial America, 1717-1775 by Aaron Spencer Fogleman (Paperback, 1996). 2. 3 New. £1. 9 Used. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Compare similar products. He is the author of Jesus Is Female: Moravians and Radical Religion in Early America, also published by the University of Pennsylvania Press. Country of Publication.

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Hopeful Journeys : German Immigration, Settlement, and Political Culture in Colonial America, 1717-1775. Part of the Early American Studies Series). by Aaron Spencer Fogleman. In 1700, some 250,000 white and black inhabitants populated the thirteen American colonies, with the vast majority of whites either born in England or descended from English immigrants. Of all the European immigrant groups, the Germans may have been the largest.

Personal Name: Fogleman, Aaron Spencer. Publication, Distribution, et. Philadelphia Early American studies. Download book Hopeful journeys : German immigration, settlement, and political culture in colonial America, 1717-1775, Aaron Spencer Fogleman.

In 1700, some 250,000 white and black inhabitants populated the thirteen American colonies, with the vast majority of whites either born in England or descended from English immigrants. By 1776, the non-Native American population had increased tenfold, and non-English Europeans and Africans dominated new immigration. Of all the European immigrant groups, the Germans may have been the largest.Aaron Spencer Fogleman has written the first comprehensive history of this eighteenth-century German settlement of North America. Utilizing a vast body of published and archival sources, many of them never before made accessible outside of Germany, Fogleman emphasizes the importance of German immigration to colonial America, the European context of the Germans' emigration, and the importance of networks to their success in America


Cyregaehus
The traditional image of Colonial America before the American Revolution is one of a thoroughly English society. This is not a wholly incorrect assessment, as most of the cultural and intellectual power resided with the English-speaking colonists. When one pictures the other aspects of Colonial America, other groups considered are usually the Native Americans. Aaron Spencer Fogleman seeks to correct this assertion by presenting the most overlooked group of settlers in the Colonies: the German-speaking peoples. “Hopefuly Journeys: German Immigration, Settlement, and Political Culture in Colonial America, 1717-1775” is a historical work centered on examining all aspects of early German migration to the New World. Whereas the nineteenth century saw a greater influx of Germans numerically to North America, Fogelman argues that the earlier immigrants had a greater early impact on the development of the ethnic diversity of what became an American Republic.
In the introduction, Fogelman sets forth the basic structure of “Hopeful Journeys” and explains the initial immigrations of Germans to the New World prior to 1717. He sees three main waves of immigration. From 1683-1709 the German immigration was precipitated by religious persecution. (5) These German groups were of radical Christian faiths not welcomed in their respective German lands, groups such as Quakers and Mennonites. (5) The second wave of immigration began in 1709 with southeastern Germans and Swiss fleeing agricultural disaster. (5) In an attempt to attract laborers to the British colonies in America, Queen Anne sought to export these fleeing German peoples to the New World, even at the Crown’s expense. (5) This experiment ultimately failed as the English were incapable of managing the large number of people seeking refuge in America. Fogleman’s main study does not include these two earlier movements of migration, but looks at the far larger number of German-speaking people moving to North America after 1717. Eventually, from 1717 until just before the outbreak of the American Revolution, “more than 80,000 German-speaking immigrants [decided to] try their luck in the New World”. (6). “Hopefully Journey’s” focus is “to link the experience of the Germans, the only substantial non-British European immigrant group in the eighteenth century, to the larger issues of the day during this period of crisis in late colonial America.” (11)
Part one of “Hopeful Journeys” is an examination of why certain German-speaking peoples left their homes to endure the arduous voyage across the Atlantic. In his assessment, Fogleman notes that the majority of immigration came from the southeastern German lands of the Palatinate and parts of Switzerland. (18) The reasons for the immigration from this specific area of Germany are multifaceted. The devastation of the Thirty Years War was focused in this area of Germany during the seventeenth century, and by the eighteenth it had only begun to recover. In fact, the population was increasing to the point it was untenable, nearly a 70 percent increase from 1720 to 1800. (23) Fogleman uses a great many charts, primary documents and maps to assist in asserting his claims. Of note are the documents associated with Karl Fredrick, margrave of Baden-Durlach, located in the Palatinate. Through governmental records of Baden-Durlach the population increase in noted, as well as the linked issues.
The dramatic rise in population decreased the cultivatable land for peasants, exacerbating food and religious tensions. Southeastern Germany was more religiously diverse than other parts of Europe, encompassing Lutherans, Catholics and radical Christians within a small area. Combined together, the population density and religious strife, many from the southeastern German lands sought new settlements. North America was not the obvious choice however. Eastern Europe was the traditional destination for many Germans. Prussia sought new settlers for its eastern regions and newly conquered Polish lands, and Catherine the Great of Russia sought Germans to settle in the lower Volga region. (33) The voyage across the Atlantic was dangerous, but many Germans decided it had its advantages, namely greater amounts of land available than in eastern Europe, and a greater degree of both personal and religious freedoms. (34)
German immigration to America did not occur in large groups, such as with religious sects like the Puritans in New England. Rather, the Germans came in small groups, usually families or groups of families from the same village. (37) Part two of “Hopeful Journeys” examines the travels, tribulations and reasons for Germans to seek life in the “neuland”, and specifically “Pinβel-Fania”. (71) Philadelphia was the primary entry port for most migration to North America, being the largest and busiest port in the American colonies. William Penn’s colony, with its greater degree of Christian religious freedom was an initial settling point for many Germans. Most immigrants sought out areas with an already established German influence or settlement. These settlements usually were reminiscent of their hometowns back in Europe, usually drawn up along the same religious or regional lines. (80) In Pennsylvania, a distinct and clearly defined “Pennsylvania German” landscape was in existence by the 1760’s. (81) In the three original counties of Pennsylvania, Chester, Philadelphia, and Bucks, Germans constituted roughly thirty eight percent of the population by 1790, whereas those of English heritage only twenty five percent. (82)
“Hopeful Journeys” uses regional and religious sources to chart the course and variety of German immigration. The distribution of German settlement as compiled by various demographers over the years was crucial to Fogleman’s study. The sources and notes used for “Hopeful Journeys” are heavily discussed and illustrated in the work’s large appendix and notes sections. These two sections alone comprise nearly one third of the work’s volume, pages 156-235. Although the work uses charts and diagrams throughout, it is in the final section that these are explained in greater detail and added to. The notes section is critical to exploring Folgeman’s research, which is seemingly extensive both from German and English language and national sources.
Mentioned previously, the majority of early German settlement came from the southeastern region of Germany and Switzerland. This area encompassed a large diversity of religious movements, and many Germans settled near where other members of their faith were already established. Fogleman uses several case studies as examples, such as the Moravians or Schwenkenfelders. While the German settlement of North America was widely dispersed at varying points of the eighteenth century, it began centralize in Pennsylvania and eventually returned to the colony. (107) In this way “Hopeful Journeys” is as much a work on the history of German immigration to the New World as it is a history of the early settlement and growth of Pennsylvania.
In the final chapters of the work, Fogelman addresses the political roles Germans played in Pennsylvania politics. Most Germans coming to the New World sought a new existence comprising the goals of religious freedom and the availability of land. These two ideas are what prompted any political action by the new German migrants. (144) Germans wished for new lands, but also protection from Indians. This desire for protection caused initial friction with the overwhelmingly Quaker government of the colony. In later years, the German settlers found new friction with Thomas Penn in land disputes. In the summation of Fogleman, the Germans, “supported whomever they thought could help them in this pursuit of land, prosperity, and security…”. (151) This willingness to shift from faction to faction irked many English-speaking politicians, such as Benjamin Franklin, as they perceived the Germans to be incongruent and shifting. (151)
The final assessment of “Hopeful Journeys” seeks to answer the question: did the Germans become “Americanized”? The answer is a compromise, both yes and no. The Germans that moved to the American colonies helped to make the colonies a diverse, multi-ethnic community. The Germans entered into politics and public debate, but still retained their own culture and language. (152) However, this slowly developed into a uniquely American-German culture, distinct from the Old World. (152)
“Hopeful Journeys” is a brief text, but delves into a unique topic of early colonial America. In many ways, it serves two purposes; presenting the Germans as an important ethnic group to eighteenth century America and how Pennsylvania evolved to be their primary home. In a sense, it serves a small audience, and this is clear with it being recommended on the inner cover as the Pennsylvania German Society’s book of the year. Nevertheless, for one studying the early period of American colonization it adds a touch of flavor and diversity to the story. In utilizing some first had accounts as sources, Fogleman adds personal touches to his overall story, drawing the reader in deeper.
Despite its brevity, it is well written, entertaining and extensively researched. It is clear the pains Aaron Fogleman undertook to acquire sources from both the United States and Europe. In his notes and appendix, every chart and theory are explained in greater detail than in the text itself. While this format is difficult for a reader seeking greater information on a topic immediately, it allows for a more uninterrupted reading of the work. As a quick, easily comprehended work, it is a worthwhile read to a myriad of persons: to the student of overall early American history, the German-American interested in heritage, or the Pennsylvanian seeking greater understanding as to the beginnings of the area.
Jaberini
I purchased this book as I wanted to get some first hand knowledge of what the journey was like for someone coming to America. Also, I wanted to know something about why they left Germany and what Germany was like at the time they left. This would provide some information for me to include in my book. This book left me with a real understanding of why my German ancestors left Germany as well as, what it was like for them when they arrived in America. You realize how brave your ancestors were to travel all the way to America.
Biaemi
I wanted to read out German immigration to the US and this book was one of the few available on Amazon. It is shorter than it appears (about 150 pages) as the appendices and endnotes consume a lot of pages.

It is an academic book, but I found it very readable and enjoyed the author's style. Roughly half the book is devoted to describing conditions in what is today SW Germany that led to large numbers (relatively) of German immigrants to the US in the 1700s. The American experience of these immigrants is largely focused on PA. When it ventures outside of PA it is largely focused on the Moravians (presumably because they kept careful records).

I really enjoyed both the descriptions of life in German and the experiences in America. I found the introduction to the politics of German immigrants in early America, particularly interesting. It's a topic that is poorly (if at all) covered in most American history works and I learned more about it in this work than in all my previous reading (and I grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country!).

I was left wanting to know more about the German population during the Revolution and after but I can hardly hold that against a book that explicitly ends its coverage at 1775.
Contancia
This is only for those wishing to understand early German immigration through Philadelphia Pennsylvania but if that is you, then this book is a must. It is an outgrowth of a thesis the author rote and it has that stile to it.
Ylonean
I really have learned a lot and newly appreciate the hardships my ancestors would have experienced. It explains why they settled where they settled. The had no money and that explains my discouragement that I didn't see a mention of anyone of them. I expected that of course but still couldn't help but hope I might find a lead that I have not yet found as to where they came from and how they moved to their final destination. So I'll keep looking for them in other ways but I would recommend the book to help others understand what it really was like and how grateful we should be to our ancestors that they persevered. Thanks
Tuliancel
Enjoyable reading.
Nargas
Lots of good information for me to read and absorb. It will certainly help me understand the lives and trials of my ancestors.
A very enlighten and moving story. Enjoyed it immensely.