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by Felicity Allen
Download Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart (Shades of Blue and Gray) fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Felicity Allen
  • ISBN:
    0826212190
  • ISBN13:
    978-0826212191
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Missouri; 2 edition (March 12, 2000)
  • Pages:
    832 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1862 kb
  • ePUB format
    1924 kb
  • DJVU format
    1111 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    379
  • Formats:
    txt doc lrf mobi


Felicity Allen's recent biography, Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart, transcends mere history

Felicity Allen's recent biography, Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart, transcends mere history. Such a sensitive and comprehensive work, therefore, may perplex the hardened historian, who is often pleased only with cold chronological facts that fit comfortably into his own predispositions. Allen's intricately documented work has the touch of a true poet who deftly and profoundly reveals not only the heart and soul of a great (and often misunderstood) American but also a way of life gone forever

Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart book. Jefferson Davis: Unconquerable Heart (Shades of Blue and Gray). 0826212190 (ISBN13: 9780826212191).

Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart book. Davis's Christian view of life runs like a thread throughout the book, binding together his devotion to God, his family, and the land. Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart brings Davis to life in a way that has never been done before. The variety of his experience, the breadth of his learning, and the consistency of his beliefs make this historical figure eminently worth knowing.

Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart brings Davis to life in a way that has never been done before. The variety of his experience, the breadth of his learning, & the consistency of his beliefs make this historical figure eminently worth knowing. When Jeff Davis died in 1889, everyone in the South knew who he was, and what he was. In Europe and the North, most people knew something about him, even if it was bad. Yet by 1977, FrankVandiver had picked up a phrase Communists were then using to obliterate their enemies and referred to him as an historical nonperson.

Preeminent Civil War historian Frank Vandiver always longed to see an interpretive biography of Jefferson Davis. Your Sketchbook Your Self.

Jefferson Davis: Unconquerable Heart Shades of Blue and Gray Jefferson Davis in a different light - as an American patriot and a human being

Jefferson Davis: Unconquerable Heart Shades of Blue and Gray Jefferson Davis in a different light - as an American patriot and a human being. In the passions that colour anything dealing with the War of Northern Aggression, it is sometimes difficult to remember that everyone involved had a life before that tragic conflict. I can't help but be grateful for the way in which Mrs. Allen brought that point home in her book. While I will still take issue with many of his wartime decisions, I can't help but be proud that our nation produced a man like Jefferson Davis.

Frank Jefferson is an Indian Menswear Brand by Ashima Group . Visit the nearest Store.

3 Shades of Blue is the final album recorded as leader by American jazz saxophonist Johnny Hodges featuring performances recorded in 1970 with vocalist Leon Thomas and composer/arranger Oliver Nelson and first released on the Flying Dutchman label

3 Shades of Blue is the final album recorded as leader by American jazz saxophonist Johnny Hodges featuring performances recorded in 1970 with vocalist Leon Thomas and composer/arranger Oliver Nelson and first released on the Flying Dutchman label. The album was rereleased in 1989 under Nelson's leadership as Black, Brown and Beautiful with additional tracks. Empty Ballroom Blues" (Duke Ellington, Cootie Williams) - 4:54.

Results from Google Books. The author begins the story "with Davis's political imprisonment at the end of the Civil War and. flashes back to his earlier life, interweaving Davis's private life as a schoolboy, a Mississippi planter, a husband, a father, and a political leader. She follows him from West Point through army service on the frontier, his election to the . House of Representatives, his regimental command in the Mexican War, his service as . secretary of war and senator, and his term as president of the Confederate States of America.

Different Shades of Blue is the eleventh studio album by blues rock guitarist Joe Bonamassa. It was released on September 22, 2014

Different Shades of Blue is the eleventh studio album by blues rock guitarist Joe Bonamassa. It was released on September 22, 2014. The album debuted at number 8 on the Billboard 200, which makes this Bonamassa's highest charting album, and his first top 10 on the chart. It was ranked No. 3 on Billboard's Year End Blues Album Chart of 2015. It has sold 96,000 copies in the United States as of February 2016.

Preeminent Civil War historian Frank Vandiver always longed to see an interpretive biography of Jefferson Davis. Finally, more than twenty years after Vandiver expressed that wish, publication of Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart makes such an interpretive biography available.

Felicity Allen begins this monumental work with Davis's political imprisonment at the end of the Civil War and masterfully flashes back to his earlier life, interweaving Davis's private life as a schoolboy, a Mississippi planter, a husband, a father, and a political leader. She follows him from West Point through army service on the frontier, his election to the U.S. House of Representatives, his regimental command in the Mexican War, his service as U.S. secretary of war and senator, and his term as president of the Confederate States of America.

Although Davis's family is the nexus of this biography, friends and enemies also play major roles. Among his friends intimately met in this book are such stellar figures as Andrew Jackson, John C. Calhoun, Zachary Taylor, Franklin Pierce, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Robert E. Lee.

With the use of contemporary accounts and Davis's own correspondence, Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart casts new light upon this remarkable man, thawing the icy image of Davis in many previous accounts. Felicity Allen shows a strong, yet gentle man; a stern soldier who loved horses, guns, poetry, and children; a master of the English language, with a dry wit; a man of powerful feelings who held them in such tight control that he was considered cold; and a home-loving Mississippian who was drawn into a vortex of national events and eventual catastrophe. At all times, "duty, honor, country" ruled his mind. Davis's Christian view of life runs like a thread throughout the book, binding together his devotion to God, his family, and the land.

Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart brings Davis to life in a way that has never been done before. The variety of his experience, the breadth of his learning, and the consistency of his beliefs make this historical figure eminently worth knowing.


tref
It's hard to read any biography of a man who not only headed up a newly-formed nation designed to protect slavery, but was a slaveholder himself and strongly supportive of the "peculiar institution."

But Felicity Allen does an excellent job of humanizing Jefferson Davis and allowing readers to see that while he was not a cruel master himself on his own plantation, he failed utterly to understand the travesty of slavery in general.

Allen is particularly good at demonstrating Davis' short-comings as an administrative leader during the Civil War, his endless squabbles with any number of subordinates and Confederate legislators, which took up endless hours of his valuable time and served as an instructive counterpoint to Abraham Lincoln's less prickly management style.
Not-the-Same
Felicity Allen's recent biography, Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart, transcends mere history. Such a sensitive and comprehensive work, therefore, may perplex the hardened historian, who is often pleased only with cold chronological facts that fit comfortably into his own predispositions. Allen's intricately documented work has the touch of a true poet who deftly and profoundly reveals not only the heart and soul of a great (and often misunderstood) American but also a way of life gone forever.
No scholar can fail to appreciate Allen's exhaustive research,, nor any layman fail to be amazed at her mass of fact and significant detail. But if fact is the body and bone of biography, truth is its revelation. And this is the outstanding accomplishment of Felicity Allen: she has recovered the heart and soul of an honorable and courageous American patriot who thought and fought and fell with his young nation.
Oxford Stroud
FireWater
Since becoming interested in the 19th Century, and the oasis of information concerning that time period, I'm still baffled as to why the 21st Century historian cannot understand the greatness of men like Jefferson Davis. All the modern historian can do is point out cultural problems of times past (slavery: as if the South was the only place on earth that had them). After reading the standard review from Amazon, I had to chime in on this great book. I've read William J. Cooper's Jefferson Davis as well as Jefferson Davis himself. Is it not interesting that modern day Jefferson Davis antagonists' (Just read James Mcpherson's preface in 'The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government") can only talk of slavery, as if this is the only motivating factor which drove J. Davis to become a relunctant secessionist, while ignoring our own cultural problems that are far worse and grandiose in scope. Modern day/ post-modern historians cannot grasp the larger picture of history. Their worldview does not allow for such truth gazing. F. Allen does a supurb job of showing us a Davis who was triumphant, depressed,ultimately defeated, caring for Negros, and a dedicated Episcopalian who knew who his Saviour was. Many of J. Davis' associates supported gradual emancipation (Bishop Meade of Va and Bishop Leonidas Polk) as to help assimulate the Negro into society. The Northern invasion of the South precluded any such cultural assimilation to take place. Read this book- It is partisan, but isn't every historian coming to work the task of history with his/her presuppositions? F. Allen is not ashamed of this and her logical conclusions about the man and his times is as accurate as a historian can get. Cheers for independent scholars who have not abdicated the task of passing story to fellow countrymen!
skyjettttt
What Mrs. Allen succeeds so brilliantly at is showing the human side of the man. I must admit that I was no fan of Jefferson Davis in his role as the President of the CSA. However, thanks to Mrs. Allen, I was able to see him in a much different light - as an American patriot and a human being. In the passions that colour anything dealing with the War of Northern Aggression, it is sometimes difficult to remember that everyone involved had a life before that tragic conflict. I can't help but be grateful for the way in which Mrs. Allen brought that point home in her book. While I will still take issue with many of his wartime decisions, I can't help but be proud that our nation produced a man like Jefferson Davis. Thanks for the insight and the education Mrs. Allen!
Nikohn
Romanticizing a champion of slavery?

Appalling.