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Download Iktomi and the boulder: A Plains Indian story fb2

by Paul Goble
Download Iktomi and the boulder: A Plains Indian story fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Paul Goble
  • ISBN:
    0440847583
  • ISBN13:
    978-0440847588
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Trumpet Club; Trumpet Club special ed edition (1992)
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1223 kb
  • ePUB format
    1480 kb
  • DJVU format
    1893 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    425
  • Formats:
    txt mobi rtf azw


Iktomi, a Plains Indian trickster, attempts to defeat a boulder with the assistance of some bats, in this story which explains why the Great Plains are covered with small stones.

Iktomi, a Plains Indian trickster, attempts to defeat a boulder with the assistance of some bats, in this story which explains why the Great Plains are covered with small stones. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Iktomi and the Boulder book. Iktomi, a Plains Indian trickster, attempts to defeat a boulder with the assistance of some bats, in this story which explains why the Great Plains are covered with small stones.

Iktomi, a Plains Indian trickster, attempts to defeat a boulder with the assistance of some bats, in this . Iktomi's story is a hilarious departure from Goble's other, more traditional tellings (the recent Her Seven Brothers, and the Caldecott Medal-winning The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses ). Comic asides abound, and the typeface cues readers as to places where improvisation is allowed. With all the somber myths and legends around, Iktomi's tale will elicit guffaws, a reward this troublemaker justly deserves. A Richard Jackson Book.

Iktomi and the Coyote: A Plains Indian Story (Venture-Health & the Human Body). Iktomi and the Buffalo Skull: A Plains Indian Story. Iktomi and the Buzzard: A Plains Indian Story. Recently Viewed and Featured. A Random And Irrelevant Coloring Book For Adults.

The Plains Indian trickster Iktomi ( Iktomi and the Boulder ; Iktomi and the Berries ) is back, starring in another hilarious tale about the consequences of greed and conceit. The silly birds fall for a typically outrageous Iktomi scheme, and are soon roasting on spits while the boy pats himself on the back. But prove premature: before Iktomi can enjoy his luscious dinner, a wily coyote tricks the trickster and gives him his just deserts.

Paul Goble (27 September 1933 – 5 January 2017) was an English writer and illustrator of children's books, especially Native American stories. Iktomi and the Boulder: A Plains Indian Story (Orchard Books, 1988). Her Seven Brothers (Aladdin, 1988). His book The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses won a Caldecott Medal in 1979. Goble was born in Haslemere, England. He grew up in Oxford where his father was a harpsichord maker, and his mother a professional musician. Death of the Iron Horse (Atheneum/Richard Jackson Books, 1987).

Paul Goble (27 September 1933 – 5 January 2017) was an English writer and illustrator of children's books, especially .

Paul Goble (27 September 1933 – 5 January 2017) was a British-American writer and illustrator of children's books, especially Native American stories. Paul Goble has received wide acclaim for his magnificent books, including "Buffalo Woman, Dream Wolf, Her Seven Brothers, " and the winner of the 1979 Caldecott Medal, "The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses.

Iktomi, a Plains Indian trickster, attempts to defeat a boulder with the assistance of some bats, in this story which explains why theGreat Plains are covered with small stones.

Nargas
Bought for my great-grandson because his father loved it read to him. I love Paul's books! The illustrations have informed my own artwork over the years.
Berkohi
I love all of the books in which Paul Goble retells Native American folktales and legends and creates the most beautiful illustrations. All are tremendously executed with great care and attention to detail, color and shadow. Sybil Blazej, Librarian, artist, children's book writer
Hellmaster
The book is a nice read aloud but goes absolutely nowhere. One really has to use all of the volumes in the series to NOT leave your story-time students with stink eye. In other news: The seller was rather late with getting it in the mail- even with express shipping.
Small Black
"Iktomi and the Boulder" is the first in a series of stories about the trickster of the Lakota retold and illustrated by Paul Goble. Iktomi (pronounced "eek-toe-me") is the hero, so to speak, of a series of humorous stories. The trickster is a universal character in North American myths and legends, known by different names in different parts of the country. The common denominator is that Iktomi is always trying to get the better of others, but usually ends up being the one who looks foolish.
In this first story Iktomi is out walking along dressed in his best clothes, so that he looks like a real chief. The problem is that as he continues on his long walk under the hot sun Iktomi starts to wish that he had not put on so many clothes. While resting in the shade of a great boulder he comes up with the idea of leaving his blanket on top of the boulder so he does not have to carry it any farther. But he tells the blanket he is doing this so that the blanket can help the boulder keep the hot sun off of him. This sounds like generosity on Iktomi's part, but as soon he notices a storm cloud is coming he wants the blanket back. The thing is, the boulder is not happy with Iktomi taking back what he has given, and he goes after our hero. Who can possibly help Iktomi against an angry boulder?
Young readers will enjoy the ways in which Iktomi proves to be too clever for his own good. In story after story Iktomi proves himself to be a mischief maker who I always up to no good and getting himself into trouble. There are older stories about Iktomi in which the Creator entrusts him with those aspects of the Creation that people seem to be mistakes, such as earthquakes, floods, disease, flies, and, of course, mosquitoes. But Goble is focusing on those that make a point about Iktomi's behavior, even if the moral is never explicitly stated.
Goble does a couple of new things with this series of books that are different from his other retelling of Native American tales. Throughout the book Iktomi's thoughts are printed in small type and the text sometimes changes to italics so that the reader can let their listeners make comments about what Iktomi is doing. Goble usually asks a question that puts Iktomi's actions in a different light or point out his, um, inconsistencies (e.g., animals are almost always laughing at Iktomi). Goble actually wants listeners to make rude remarks about Iktomi, to really get into the spirit of the story. He also points out that at some point the storyteller should lift their forefinger for silence so that they can go on with the story.
Dobpota
I love this story and consider it the best of the Iktomi series. My boys squealed with delight as the boulder chased Iktomi UP A HILL!! Being two tricksters themselves, they get a kick out of Iktomi’s behavior, while also seeing that what goes around comes around.