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by Juan R. García
Download Mexicans in the Midwest, 1900-1932 fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Juan R. García
  • ISBN:
    0816515859
  • ISBN13:
    978-0816515851
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Arizona Press; First Edition edition (January 1, 2004)
  • Pages:
    305 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1310 kb
  • ePUB format
    1549 kb
  • DJVU format
    1319 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    237
  • Formats:
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Here is a book that persuasively challenges many prevailing assumptions about Mexican people and the communities they established in the Midwest. The author notes the commonalities and differences between Mexicans in that region and their compadres who settled elsewhere.

Here is a book that persuasively challenges many prevailing assumptions about Mexican people and the communities they established in the Midwest. He further demonstrates that although Mexicans in the Midwest maintained a strong sense of cultural identity, they were quick to adopt the consumer culture and other elements of . life that met their needs

X, 292 pages ; 24 cm. Early in this century, a few Mexican migrants began streaming northward into the Midwest, but by 1914 - in response to jobs created by the war in Europe and a booming . economy - the stream had become a flood.

X, 292 pages ; 24 cm. Barely a generation later, this so-called Immigrant Generation of Mexicans was displaced and returned to the . Southwest or to Mexico. Here is a book that persuasively challenges many prevailing assumptions about Mexican people and the communities they. Established in the Midwest.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Mexicans in the Midwest, 1900-1932 by Juan R. .Mexican immigrants to the Midwest were largely young, unattached males

Mexican immigrants to the Midwest were largely young, unattached males. Most of them saw their stay in the Midwest as temporary; thus, very few sought naturalization or citizenship. Midwestern economics and employment practices made them a highly mobile population. This mobility and the predominance of males profoundly affected the development and dynamics of Mexican communities in the Midwest.

Start by marking Mexicans in the Midwest, 1900-1932 as Want to Read . Here is a book that persuasively challenges many prevailing assumptions about Mexican people and the communities they established in the Midwest.

Start by marking Mexicans in the Midwest, 1900-1932 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. life that met their needs.

Early in this century, a few Mexican migrants began streaming northward into the Midwest, but by 1914-in response to the war in Europe and a booming . economy-the stream had become a flood

Early in this century, a few Mexican migrants began streaming northward into the Midwest, but by 1914-in response to the war in Europe and a booming . economy-the stream had become a flood.

He further demonstrates that although Mexicans in the Midwest maintained a strong sense of cultural identity, they were quick to adopt the consumer culture and other elements of . Focusing on a people, place, and time rarely covered before now, this wide-ranging work will be welcomed by scholars and students of history, sociology, and Chicano studies. General readers interested in ethnic issues and the multicultural fabric of American society will find here a window to the past as well as new perspectives for understanding the present and the future.

Gregson, Mary Eschelbach, 1997. Mexicans in the Midwest: 1900†1932. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1996. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Mexicans in the Midwest, 1900-1932. ISBN 9780816515851 (978-0-8165-1585-1) Softcover, University of Arizona Press, 2004. Find signed collectible books: 'Mexicans in the Midwest, 1900-1932'. Coauthors & Alternates.

Mexican American bibliography. This is a Mexican American bibliography. This list consists of books, and journal articles, about Mexican Americans, Chicanos, and their history and culture. The list includes works of literature whose subject matter is significantly about Mexican Americans and the Chicano/a experience. This list does not include works by Mexican American writers which do not address the topic, such as science texts by Mexican American writers.

Early in this century, a few Mexican migrants began streaming northward into the Midwest, but by 1914--in response to the war in Europe and a booming U.S. economy--the stream had become a flood. Barely a generation later, this so-called Immigrant Generation of Mexicans was displaced and returned to the U.S. Southwest or to Mexico. Drawing on both published works and archival materials, this new study considers the many factors that affected the process of immigration as well as the development of communities in the region. These include the internal forces of religion, ethnic identity, and a sense of nationalism, as well as external influences such as economic factors, discrimination, and the vagaries of U.S.-Mexico relations. Here is a book that persuasively challenges many prevailing assumptions about Mexican people and the communities they established in the Midwest. The author notes the commonalities and differences between Mexicans in that region and their compadres who settled elsewhere. He further demonstrates that although Mexicans in the Midwest maintained a strong sense of cultural identity, they were quick to adopt the consumer culture and other elements of U.S. life that met their needs. Focusing on a people, place, and time rarely covered before now, this wide-ranging work will be welcomed by scholars and students of history, sociology, and Chicano studies. General readers interested in ethnic issues and the multicultural fabric of American society will find here a window to the past as well as new perspectives for understanding the present and the future.