» » Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians: Material Culture and Race in Colonial Louisiana (Early American Studies)

Download Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians: Material Culture and Race in Colonial Louisiana (Early American Studies) fb2

by Sophie White
Download Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians: Material Culture and Race in Colonial Louisiana (Early American Studies) fb2
Americas
  • Author:
    Sophie White
  • ISBN:
    0812244370
  • ISBN13:
    978-0812244373
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Pennsylvania Press (December 13, 2012)
  • Pages:
    360 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1869 kb
  • ePUB format
    1228 kb
  • DJVU format
    1261 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    456
  • Formats:
    lit rtf lrf doc


Sophie White has done that with Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians.

Sophie White has done that with Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians. Her insistence on finding a way to look at colonial people allows the rest of us to see them with a new clarity that reveals how much we have missed in the contested process that made race in the Atlantic World. -Emily Clark, Tulane University. And she encases it all.

Early american studies. Exploring neglected aspects of our colonial, revolutionary, and early national history and culture, early American Studies reinterprets familiar themes and events in fresh ways. Interdisciplinary in character, and with a special emphasis on the period from about 1600 to 1850, the series is published in partnership with the McNeil Center for Early American Studies.

Sophie White traces these processes in her detailed study of material culture, Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians. White focuses on cross-cultural exchanges between French colonists and Native Americans and argues that both groups adopted clothing and goods for their usefulness and because those objects expressed their ethnic and social identity to others

DEADLY RACE - Walkthrough Gameplay Part 5 - ALL CAR (Speed Car Bumps Challenge) - Продолжительность: 11:31 PlaygamedroidPro Recommended for you.

DEADLY RACE - Walkthrough Gameplay Part 5 - ALL CAR (Speed Car Bumps Challenge) - Продолжительность: 11:31 PlaygamedroidPro Recommended for you. 11:31. Fri 1 Funny Clips Cartoon World - Продолжительность: 40:27 Mr Bean Cartoon World Recommended for you.

Home Browse Books Book details, Wild Frenchmen and .

Home Browse Books Book details, Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians: Material. Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians: Material Culture and Race in Colonial Louisiana. Sophie White is Associate Professor in the Department of American Studies at the University of Notre Dame. This woman’s material culture testifies to the transformations engineered by French and Indians as a result of colonization, conversion, and métissage (the mixing of peoples). For there were numerous other instances of French-Indian exchanges and crosscultural dressing in Louisiana. Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians is a brilliant book

Download with Google.

Download with Google. Wild Frenchmen & Frenchified Indians: Material Culture and Race in Colonial Louisiana.

History; Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society; Journal of Jesuit Studies; Journal of Southern History; The Historian; Le Journal; Revue d’histoire moderne et contemporaine; Textile History; The William and Mary Quarterly; The Winterthur Portfolio.

In Wild Frenchmen and Frenchied Indians, Sophie White.

Fourteen years earlier when Indian-born Marie Rouensa-canie died in. Kaskaskia her substantial estate included French-style clothing, buildings, and. household furniture. Saguingouara’s and Rouensa-canie’s adoptions of French. In Wild Frenchmen and Frenchied Indians, Sophie White. unpacks with great precision why natives in French Illinois Country adopted. particular cultural practices and when xed racial classications developed.

Series: Early American Studies. Based on a sweeping range of archival, visual, and material evidence, Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians examines perceptions of Indians in French colonial Louisiana and demonstrates that material culture-especially dress-was central to the elaboration of discourses about race. At the heart of France's seventeenth-century plans for colonizing New France was a formal on.

Based on a sweeping range of archival, visual, and material evidence, Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians examines perceptions of Indians in French colonial Louisiana and demonstrates that material culture—especially dress—was central to the elaboration of discourses about race.At the heart of France's seventeenth-century plans for colonizing New France was a formal policy—Frenchification. Intended to turn Indians into Catholic subjects of the king, it also carried with it the belief that Indians could become French through religion, language, and culture. This fluid and mutable conception of identity carried a risk: while Indians had the potential to become French, the French could themselves be transformed into Indians. French officials had effectively admitted defeat of their policy by the time Louisiana became a province of New France in 1682. But it was here, in Upper Louisiana, that proponents of French-Indian intermarriage finally claimed some success with Frenchification. For supporters, proof of the policy's success lay in the appearance and material possessions of Indian wives and daughters of Frenchmen.Through a sophisticated interdisciplinary approach to the material sources, Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians offers a distinctive and original reading of the contours and chronology of racialization in early America. While focused on Louisiana, the methodological model offered in this innovative book shows that dress can take center stage in the investigation of colonial societies—for the process of colonization was built on encounters mediated by appearance.


Anazan
Sophie White shows the new dimension on history that can be obtained from material culture. She takes a few wills, property inventories, and contracts, together with a broad understanding of how people express themselves through their possessions, adds the perspective of material culture -- the norms of the culture and a broad knowledge of how the two cultures differed in expression -- and constructs an understanding of the individuals within their context on the border of French immigrants and creoles with native American inhabitants. An excellent study, well illustrated and explained for amateurs like me.
GYBYXOH
Fantastic look at sartorial manifestations of cultural changes.
Meztihn
Très bien
Humin
This study of the clothing and other material possessions of the Illinois territory's inhabitants provided many interesting insights into the interaction of French and Indian cultures in colonial Louisiana. The writing style was a bit repetitious, but the information was well worth the read. The examples in the photos and illustrations filled out the descriptions well. As a side note, I was delighted to see the voyageurs (and others) wearing 18th-century versions of the hoody.
Celace
This is a fine, rich book, based on years of research in primary sources—notarial records, parish registers, and administrative correspondence. Professor White’s work is emphatically history from the bottom up. She burrows deep into the lives and the minds of the wide array of folks who populated French Louisiana—habitants and habitantes, French marines, merchants, voyageurs, Indians, métis and métisses, and black slaves. And Louisiana means all of Louisiana, for she is steeped in sources from both the lower colony (New Orleans) and the upper (the Illinois Country). Professor White is little concerned with passing political events, histoire événementielle, in French Louisiana, for she has other fish to fry.
Professor White’s interests in race, métissage, and slavery are in no way exceptional, but when combined with her deep knowledge of material culture (especially clothing) they lead to unique and penetrating insights about French colonial society in Louisiana. “Indians could conceivably “improve” their state through conversion and Frenchification to become ‘French,’ . . . just as ‘civilized’ Frenchmen might ‘degenerate’ into wild men by becoming Indian. Dress channeled each of these potential instances of metamorphosis.” Or again, French “colonists deployed clothing to uphold the fiction of French moral and social order in the colony, allowing them to exert control over the hinterlands. . . .” One need not necessarily agree with all of Professor White’s conclusions to remark that each of her paragraphs has been thoroughly thought out and carefully written.
Professor White’s wide reading in both primary and secondary sources leads to many interesting and significant apeçus. She notes, for example, that eighteenth-century folks, even those from the upper classes, were more concerned with clean apparel than with bodily cleanliness. This observation is affirmed by the extraordinary quantity of linen shirts listed in Louisiana succession documents. Professor White’s original approach to French colonial history shines through in many such observations, which make this book essential reading for all enthusiasts of French Louisiana.
Buriwield
Excellent.