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by Eri Hotta
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Americas
  • Author:
    Eri Hotta
  • ISBN:
    0307739740
  • ISBN13:
    978-0307739742
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Vintage; Reprint edition (August 12, 2014)
  • Pages:
    368 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Americas
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1913 kb
  • ePUB format
    1493 kb
  • DJVU format
    1621 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    471
  • Formats:
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Japan 1941: Countdown t. Hotta illuminates the extraordinary ideological and military predicament in which Japan found itself in the months before the attack on Pearl Harbo. rings to life the key figures of a deeply divided Japanese leadershi. crupulously details negotiations and squabble. gainst a backdrop of dauntingly complex domestic and international maneuverings.

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Magazine article America in WWII. Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy. Magazine article America in WWII. Author Eri Hotta worked primarily from Japanese sources-meeting minutes, published and unpublished memoirs, correspondence, and newspaper articles-to paint a full picture of the decision-making process that ultimately led to Japan's ruin. The roots of the 1941 crisis in Japan went back several decades.

Автор: Hotta Eri Название: Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy ISBN: 0307739740 ISBN-13(EAN) .

A groundbreaking history that considers the attack on Pearl Harbor from the Japanese perspective and is certain to revolutionize how we think of the war in the Pacific. When Japan attacked the United States in 1941, its leaders, in large part, understood they were entering a war they were almost certain to lose.

When Japan attacked the United States in 1941, its leaders, in large part, understood they were .

When Japan attacked the United States in 1941, its leaders, in large part, understood they were entering a war they were almost certain to lose.

We are delighted to be hosting Eri Hotta, author of Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy, and her husband, who is a.The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, stunned virtually everyone in the United States military.

We are delighted to be hosting Eri Hotta, author of Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy, and her husband, who is a celebrated Asian scholar and a prolific writer whom I know many of you are familiar with, Ian Buruma. Ian will engage Eri in what is certain to be a very lively conversation about Japan and its role in World War II. This will be followed by a discussion with you, our distinguished audience. The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, stunned virtually everyone in the United States military

In her book, she recounts the inner deliberations that led to the attack, which included many who wished to avoid war but continue Japan’s territorial expansion and a fractured political landscape that included two authorities, the emperor and the civilian government

Eri Hotta looks at how the attack on Pearl Harbor was viewed from Japan’s perspective. We aim at Unseen Japan to discuss things from Japan’s perspective. This book is right in line with that mission.

Eri Hotta looks at how the attack on Pearl Harbor was viewed from Japan’s perspective. Category: Books on Japan Tag: world war ii. Description. The decision to bomb Pearl Harbor proved catastrophic for Japan.

Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy

Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy.

A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of the YearA groundbreaking history that considers the attack on Pearl Harbor from the Japanese perspective and is certain to revolutionize how we think of the war in the Pacific.When Japan attacked the United States in 1941, its leaders, in large part, understood they were entering a war they were almost certain to lose. In a groundbreaking history that considers Pearl Harbor from the Japanese perspective, certain to revolutionize how we think of the war in the Pacific, Eri Hotta poses essential questions overlooked for the last seventy years: Why did these men—military men, civilian politicians, diplomats, the emperor—put their country and its citizens in harm's way? Why did they make a decision that was doomed from the start? Introducing us to the doubters, bluffers, and schemers who led their nation into this conflagration, Hotta brilliantly shows us a hidden Japan—eager to avoid war but fraught with tensions with the West, deluded by reckless militarism, tempted by the gambler’s dream of scoring the biggest win against impossible odds and nearly escaping disaster before it finally proved inevitable.


Sennnel
Everyone knows that, on December 7th, 1941, the Japanese Navy attacked the American base at Pearl Harbor. Numerous ships were sunk or damaged, scores of planes destroyed, and over 2,000 people were killed. But what led Japan to take such a drastic step to start a war that they had no hope of winning? Eri Hotta attempts to answer this question in "Japan 1941".

One could argue that World War II began when Japan invaded China in 1931. From that point forward, Japan was under scrutiny from the rest of the world, including the United States. By 1941, Japan was suffering from sanctions, including an embargo on oil and scrap metal from the United States. War with the United States was a distinct possibility.

But what of the preparations for this war? Hotta argues, rightly so, that the Japanese were unprepared to fight a successful war against the United States. The industrial might of the United States would overwhelm Japan. Japan, in the words of Winston Churchill, would be ground into dust.

Despite the vast difference in industrial might, many Japanese felt that war was the only answer. Others believed that success could be achieved through negotiation. It was this constant bickering and interservice rivalry that ultimately doomed Japan. Hotta states that none of Japan's top leaders had sufficient will, desire, or courage to stop the momentum for war. The attack on Pearl Harbor can be viewed loosely as a tactical success for the Japanese. But the result was a strategic nightmare, for only 6 months later, the Japanese advance was stopped at Midway.

I found this book to be an informative narrative about Japan's preparations for war in 1941. The narrative encompasses all major aspects of what the diplomatic and military situation was like for Japan from the time of the invasion of China up to the attack on Pearl Harbor. Although somewhat difficult to read due to all of the names, the book nonetheless contains a wealth of information about Japan's preparations for war.
Thetalen
This is an interesting book as it shows the desire for consensus, service benefits and face saving that led the leaders of Japan to start a war their professionals expected to lose. The private and more honest opinions of military and civilian leaders weren't the ones they expressed in imperial conferences. Japan had been in a quagmire in China but continued with policies that were draining the country. Their actions in China were thoroughly detested by most of the world. Japanese leaders knew Japan couldn't match the industrial output of America yet they were willing to gamble that they could attack the US and allies in Asia, quickly grab what they wanted and then, somehow, make peace with the countries they attacked and still get to keep what they had taken. Japan struck in December 1941. Admiral Yamamoto was quoted in early 1942 as saying; "In the first six to twelve months of a war with the United States and Great Britain I will run wild and win victory upon victory. But then, if the war continues after that, I have no expectation of success." In less than 6 months the Battle of Midway (June 4th, 1942) ended the run of Japanese victories.
wanderpool
Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy is an interesting view of the march to War by the Japanese government in 1941.

This is not a military book. 'Tora! Tora! Tora! ' is the definitive view of the military's preparation for the Pearl Harbor attack. This book focuses on the actions of the Japanese Government during the year when war and peace were in play in Tokyo.

Eri Hotta is a Japanese-American historian. As such, she has a foot in both cultures and a clear understanding of the difference in viewpoints and attitudes between them. The book details these differences; it shows how the Japanese filtered the American response to their actions through their own cultural biases. At the same time, the book also shows how the U.S. Government failed to understand Japan in any way, shape or form. The history of U.S. racism made Japan feel as though it was constantly looked down on by the U.S. These feelings made the Japanese notion of 'saving face' paramount in its dealings with America. The American government, secure in its white supremacy, did not think for a moment how that attitude colored its relationship with Japan.

Another interesting facet of this book is the failure of the peace forces within Japan to speak up at critical junctures. Time and again, Eri Hotta documents key meetings where the road to war could have been derailed if those who supported peace would have forcefully spoken. Fearful of being branded as cowards or traitors, those who were convinced that Japan could not win a war with the United States sat silent. As a result the military triumphed and the path to war was chosen over the path to peace.

The final irony of this story is the rarely discussed issue of the Japanese-German alliance. The Japanese initially backed Hitler as a counterpoise to the British. England had many colonies in the Pacific and the Japanese felt that a Hitler victory in Europe could waken the English presence in the Pacific and allow the Japanese hegemony in their own region. They were under no illusion about the Nazis. They realized that Hitler was even more racist than the Americans or the English. They did not love Hitler, they merely found him useful. They were willing to jettison him by 1941- he had not successfully attacked England and had not weakened the British in the Pacific.

However, the U.S. did not take their offer to end the alliance with Hitler seriously and so, a key negotiating point was lost.

Japan 1941: Countdown to infamy, could have been called' Countdown through Irony.' It is an enlightening book. The lesson, as in so many histories is that countries who are engaged in serious issues with other countries should take the time and trouble to understand their adversaries. True cultural understanding could have saved both the Japanese and the Americans much blood and treasure. Their mutual ignorance of each other's culture ushered in the Atomic age which haunts our planet to this day.