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by Douglas Brinkley
Download Witness to America: An Illustrated Documentary History of the United States from the Revolution to Today fb2
Africa
  • Author:
    Douglas Brinkley
  • ISBN:
    0062716115
  • ISBN13:
    978-0062716118
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harper; 1st edition (October 20, 1999)
  • Pages:
    624 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Africa
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1797 kb
  • ePUB format
    1818 kb
  • DJVU format
    1698 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    882
  • Formats:
    rtf mbr mobi docx


The United States has to move very fast to even stand still.

The United States has to move very fast to even stand still.

Douglas Brinkley (born December 14, 1960) is an American author, Katherine Tsanoff Brown Chair in Humanities and professor of history at Rice University

Douglas Brinkley (born December 14, 1960) is an American author, Katherine Tsanoff Brown Chair in Humanities and professor of history at Rice University. He is a public spokesperson on conservation issues. He joined the faculty of Rice University as a professor of history in 2007. Brinkley was born in Atlanta, Georgia in 1960, but raised in Perrysburg, Ohio. His parents were high school teachers.

Ambrose, Stephen E; Brinkley, Douglas. Rev. and enl. ed. 1949. Contains primary source material.

Witness to America book .

book by Stephen E. Ambrose. Excerpts from publications by figures from the military, commerce, sports, and politics chronicle the history of the United States.

Brinkley's first book was Jean Monnet: The Path to European Unity (1992)

Brinkley's first book was Jean Monnet: The Path to European Unity (1992). The publication of Dean Acheson: The Cold War Years (1992) brought Brinkley popular acclaim. Brinkley and Johnny Depp were nominated for a Grammy for their co-authoring of the liner notes to the documentary: Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson.

Home Douglas Brinkley WITNESS TO AMERICA : An Illustrated .

Home Douglas Brinkley WITNESS TO AMERICA : An Illustrated Documentary History of the. Witness to America reads as if it were today’s news about unforgettable chapters of our history, told by those who lived it and those who observed it. -Steven Spielberg.

Douglas Brinkley takes us on the incredible journey of the United States - a nation formed from a vast countryside on whose fringes a few small colonies made a bold cast at freedom.

The guests talk about their book, Witness to America: An Illustrated Documentary History of the United States from the Revolution to Today, published by Harper Resource.

Witness to America: An Illustrated Documentary History. Excerpts from A Bibliography of the Writings of Bernard DeVoto by Julius P. Barclay, from Four Portraits and One Subject: Bernard DeVoto.

“Witness to America reads as if it were today’s news about unforgettable chapters of our history, told by those who lived it and those who observed it.” —Steven Spielberg

“The selection of first person narratives is superb, the connective passages are clear and convincing, and the overall effect is to transport the reader on a fascinating journey through American life.” — Doris Kearns Goodwin, Pulitzer Prize winning author of Team of Rivals

Called “a feast of a book” by Arthur Schlesinger Jr., Witness to America is a classic collection of primary source accounts covering the history of the United States, from George Washington to Barack Obama and everything in between. Originally compiled in 1938 by Henry Steele Commager and Allan Nevins and revised with Stephen Ambrose, Witness to America has been brought up to date by bestselling historian Douglas Brinkley (The Wilderness Warrior, The Great Deluge).


Nikohn
Witness to America is a very unique book in that it is an assortment of individual snapshots to various points in our history and gives entertaining and brief essays on each snapshot. This is definatly a book you could read for a few minutes of borrowed time and then put back down, if you had to. I originally checked this book out at the local library because as a fan of Stephen Ambrose's books I found it interesting. After renewing it twice because I hated to part with it, I knew I had to buy a copy for my bookshelf. This is a great book and I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.
Sinredeemer
A gift to my son. He really enjoyed the book.
Ieregr
This book is great for history and social studies teachers. The book is broken into small snipets of history that are the perfect length for one lesson. In a time when textbooks give only partial views on history slanted towards the views of the editors and publishers of the textbook, this is a refeshing use of primary source material. Ambrose and Brinkley let historic figures speak for themselves.
Wanenai
Not a specific themed book. Don't know what the thesis is. A lot of big name authors just trying to sell one more book.
Modigas
You have to understand what this book is before you can decide whether it will be of use to you. It is not a comprehensive history of the United States as told by Stephen Ambrose and Douglass Brinkley. Rather, it is a collection of 170 articles or vignettes on different, mostly well-known, events in American History. These articles are writings contemporaneous with the events described.

There are also many illustrations and photographs and a really interesting audio CD with a number of selections dramatically recreated and some of them audio with the actual participants.

Stephen Ambrose and Douglass Brinkley have based their text on previous edition done by Henry Steele Commager and Allan Nevins. Because these are selections and usually only one perspective is given of each event (editors always have to balance sweep and perspective with limited space), the viewpoints presented may differ with your own. However, I find the value of contemporary perspective quite valuable - especially in teaching my children. I can balance any bias I see with other books and by delving more deeply into the event described. But these articles make a great jumping off point.

There is a bibliography providing the sources of each article, but there is not an index. Because of the nature of this book, the table of contents and the bibliography are probably enough.
lucky kitten
Some great anecdotes and some not so much. It is pretty cool to have eyewitness accounts pace through history. The point seems to be more of a history "feel" than thorough coverage. Which puts this book in coffee table territory . . . without the pictures. But at a good price there are stories worth the whole book - I liked Samuel Morse, Sam "Golden Rule" Jones, Carl Rowan and Edward Murrow best. There are also overall good choices for race issues.

Beware - George F. Kennan's "Strategy of Containment" is most deadly boring. The editor gets lazy in the end and throws us 2 Reagan, 1 GW Bush and 1 Obama speech to pretty much cover the 80s, 90's and 00's.
Malojurus
First, you need to appreciate that this is indeed a "coffee table" book, and is not, never was intended, to be a piece of serious scholarship. It's for browsing, and with that purpose in mind, "Witness to America" offers enough disparate accounts to make it interesting. The book consists of first person narratives at various junctures in U.S. history, broadly organized by the major societal transitions that this nation experienced (e.g., "The Last West" "The Rise of the City, "The Progressive Era," "The Individual Rights Movement"). These strike me as pretty standard categorizations, what you would typically find in most school texts, so ignore the reader comments that allude to some special "agenda" of the editors -- liberal or otherwise. Besides, the editors keep their prefacatory comments to each reading exceedingly brief, and allow the "witnesses" to speak for themselves.
"Witness" does cover broad territory, with many accounts that represent both influential and minor participants in America's development. That's a plus, as it is always enlightening to see how both the big players as well as the everyday citizens interpret events around them. On the other hand, these are all American observers, and you wonder how much more the book might have accomplished had it included "witnesses" from the outside looking in. For example, we get to read General Washington's farewell address to his troops. Wouldn't it have been fascinating to see some of General Cornwallis' observations on the defeat of England and his take on this new nation "born of rebellion?" Similarly, we read Secretary of State Cordell Hull's recollections of the day Pearl Harbor was attacked, and sense his scorn for what seem in his mind to be those "naughty little Japanese ambassadors." Again, what about a view of America from somebody like Admiral Yamamoto?
Okay, maybe I'm being a bit picky here. Including these "outside views" would make a 600+ page book even longer. But then again, so much of U.S. history is cast as how we look at ourselves. The added diversity of other views would have been fascinating in a work like this. So look at "Witness" as the work it was intended to be -- a reference for browsing. Even the editors explain at the beginning of their citation list that they have declined to annotate it because they are serving the interest of general readers, not scholars. Three and one-half stars.