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by Joseph Morgan Hodge
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Africa
  • Author:
    Joseph Morgan Hodge
  • ISBN:
    0821417185
  • ISBN13:
    978-0821417188
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ohio University Press; 1 edition (March 20, 2007)
  • Pages:
    408 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Africa
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1104 kb
  • ePUB format
    1602 kb
  • DJVU format
    1486 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    418
  • Formats:
    docx rtf mobi lrf


While the book is scholarly and sometimes repetative, it covers an important part of history relating to British colonialism.

In stock on May 29, 2018. Joseph Morgan Hodge is an assistant professor of history at West Virginia University in Morgantown. Series: Ecology & History. While the book is scholarly and sometimes repetative, it covers an important part of history relating to British colonialism.

Journal of British Studies. Recommend this journal. Journal of British Studies.

The most striking feature of British colonialism in the twentieth century was the confidence it. .Chapter 7 Triumph of the Expert: Development, Environment, and the Second Colonial Occupation, 1945–60.

The most striking feature of British colonialism in the twentieth century was the confidence it expressed in the use of science and expertise, especially when .Book Description: The most striking feature of British colonialism in the twentieth century was the confidence it expressed in the use of science and expertise, especially when joined with the new bureaucratic capacities of the state, to develop natural and human resources of the empire.

Triumph of the Expert book. Triumph of the Expert is a history of British colonial doctrine and its contribution to the emergence of The most striking feature of British colonialism in the twentieth century was the confidence it expressed in the use of science and expertise, especially when joined with the new bureaucratic capacities of the state, to develop natural and human resources of the empire

by Joseph Morgan Hodge. Courtesy of OSPA His book "follows the origins, course and legacies of the strategic engagement.

by Joseph Morgan Hodge. Joseph Hodge, now teaching at West Virginia University, was trained as a historian before he turned to Development Studies and that background, coupled with a growing frustration with Development Studies discourse, led him to seek the roots of later theory and practice in the writings and experience of the professionals and scientists, and especially the agriculturalists, deployed in increasing numbers by the Colonial.

Request PDF On Sep 1, 2008, Gail Hook and others published Triumph of the Expert: Agrarian Doctrines of.

Request PDF On Sep 1, 2008, Gail Hook and others published Triumph of the Expert: Agrarian Doctrines of Development and the Legacies of British Colonialism Joseph Morgan Hodge. Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 2007.

By Joseph Moran Hodge. Series in Ecology and History

By Joseph Moran Hodge. Series in Ecology and History. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2007. Pp. xiv, 302; 23 illustrations.

In Triumph of the Expert historian Joseph Morgan Hodge examines the growing influence of technical experts and advisors in determining British colonial development policies in the . The book is divided into 6 chapters.

In Triumph of the Expert historian Joseph Morgan Hodge examines the growing influence of technical experts and advisors in determining British colonial development policies in the years between 1895 and 1960. Hodge traces in painstaking detail the intricacies of colonial policy making as imperial authorities grappled with the questions of science, agriculture, development, and colonial rule in primarily sub-Saharan Africa.

Triumph of the Expert is a history of British colonial doctrine and its contribution to the emergence of rural development and environmental policies in the late colonial and postcolonial. ISBN13:9780821417188.

The most striking feature of British colonialism in the twentieth century was the confidence it expressed in the use of science and expertise, especially when joined with the new bureaucratic capacities of the state, to develop natural and human resources of the empire.Triumph of the Expert is a history of British colonial doctrine and its contribution to the emergence of rural development and environmental policies in the late colonial and postcolonial period. Joseph Morgan Hodge examines the way that development as a framework of ideas and institutional practices emerged out of the strategic engagement between science and the state at the climax of the British Empire. Hodge looks intently at the structural constraints, bureaucratic fissures, and contradictory imperatives that beset and ultimately overwhelmed the late colonial development mission in sub-Saharan Africa, south and southeast Asia, and the Caribbean.Triumph of the Expert seeks to understand the quandaries that led up to the important transformation in British imperial thought and practice and the intellectual and administrative legacies it left behind.

Ffan
Dr. Hodge in this book makes a strong case for decolonization. He is not only an excellent writer but he is also an excellent professor. He is one of the scholars to watch out for in the field of New Imperial History.

Joseph Hodge has carefully documented how British policy in the colonies aimed at developing the resources of the colonies with the hope of stimulating "agricultural production of much-needed raw materials and foodstuffs in the colonies, while at the same time raising purchasing power and demand for manufactured goods from Britain." Throughout the many years of empire, Hodge argues, the British invested heavily on agricultural science and health science. A lot of resources were committed to scientific research in these areas. This doctrine of scientific development/ colonialism was originally championed by Joseph Chamberlain the colonial secretary and it lived on in his successors such as Leopold Amery who was colonial secretary in 1924. Amery argued that Britain had a moral responsibility to develop the colonial regions by way of expanding agricultural production and opening new markets for British industry and trade. The "twin keys" to colonial development for him meant improved communication and scientific research. Research in human science was important because the colonies were not habitable for the British. There were diseases in the colonies such as malaria which made African colonies the "Whiteman's grave." Research in this area was necessary in order to attract a larger percentage of British people to settle in the colonies. The "experts" played an important role in the empire. By experts, Hodge means a whole cadre of technical support staff such as "agronomists, anthropologists, doctors, ecologists, economists, nutritional experts, soil scientists, public health officials, teachers, and many others." Despite the work of all the experts and the billions of British Pounds that were committed to the development of resources in the African colonies, Britain was still not able to achieve its goal of developing the resources of the African colonies to the point of expanding its domestic economy. Agricultural production did not significantly improve and the colonies in Africa did not attract a large population of the British settling in them. At the same time, Britain was digging itself deeper into debt. After the Second World War, Britain had to make a choice between continuing to invest heavily in the colonies without any hopes of improving her economic situation or cutting their losses and leaving the colonies. As Hodge argues, by the mid-1950s, it had become transparently clear to the British that their development mission in Africa was limited. Frank Samuel, the manager of the United Africa Company who was responsible for the failed East Africa Groundnut scheme by the early 1950's concluded that upon reviewing the facts, he can only reach the conclusion that "there has been a great deal of wishful thinking on the part of the many writers and speakers who have, since the war, created an impression that Tropical Africa is an El Dorado of wealth sorely neglected in the past and capable of being developed rapidly on a grand scale. I take a far more sober view of that position." Hodge's argument is that the failure of scientific colonialism in Africa coupled with the later lack of co-operation of the local elites led to the end of empire in Africa.

I agree with Hodge. My argument is that if Britain's scientific investments in Africa had been as successful as they had anticipated, the empire would have lasted much longer because Britain would have had the financial resources necessary to underwrite their war cost and would not have been dependent on the United States for loans after the Suez Canal crisis.
fire dancer
I was born in Kenya in 1950, and my father was the rugged Scottish agriculturalist who was asked by Jomo Kenyatta to quickly design and implement a plan for resettlement of the white lands with African farmers in what was then known as the Million Acre Scheme. While the book is scholarly and sometimes repetative, it covers an important part of history relating to British colonialism. I bought the book for my father, Alexander Storrar, so that he could read it and remember the great work of those days, and at 88 years old, he thoroughly enjoyed it.
Alister
This is one of the rarest of environmental and scientific histories of the British Empire because of its balance and rigorous archival research. The author is a very good writer, and as one of the other reviewers noted, it can be read by non-scholars with an interest in the subject.